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November 13, 1969 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-13

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, November 13, 1969

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, November 13, 1969

OHIO STATE NEXT

OUR TWO NEW UNIVERSITY SHOP SUITS
BRING A FRESH SPIRIT TO
NATURAL- SHOULDER TAILORING
We've added two new models to our University Shop
suit collections -- a six-button double-breasted and
a two-button single-breasted suit. On both styles the
arm holes are smaller and higher, the, sleeves nar-
rower. The jackets are tapered in closer, and we gave
both suits a deep cener vent, wider lapels and larger
pocket flaps. The trouser legs, too, are new-cut
straighter up and down. Both styles are ready now
in a large selection of stripes, plaids and plain colors,
in a full size range, $95 to $130.
THE UNIVERSITY SHOP
SAKS FIFTH AVENUE
332 South State Street, Ann Arbor
Yale s Princeton University of Michigan New York White Plains Springfield Garden City
Washington" Atlanta - Ft. Lauderdale. Chicago " Skokie" Detroit" Troy - Palo Alto -

Bell follows the 'Roses'

By BETSY MAIION
A rose by any other name may
smell just as sweet, but it is
doubtful whether or not it would
have the same attraction as the
fabled flower or the Post-season
game named after it.
The thought of possibly play-
ing in the Rose Bowl has lured
talented high school players to
Big Ten schools almost sinec the
game's inception. One such
young man who followed the
roses is Ashley Bell, Purdue's
record-breaking sophomore.
While on a recruiting visit to
the Lafayette campus, Bell saw
the films of the 1967 Rose Bowl
g a m e in which Purdue edged
Southern California 14-13.. "I
definitely thought of the Rose
Bowl when making my decis-
ion," he admitted.
THE FACT that Bell ever got
near the Purdue campus was
the result of an accident. While

Sell
a
in Daily.
Classifieds

winning 12 varsity letters in
basketball, baseball and, of
course, football at a New Jer-
sey prep school he "never heard
that much about the Big Ten."
He followed collegiate football
in the South and hoped to play
down there.
Then a Purdue scout arrived
on the scene hoping to convince
one of Bell's teammates that he
should attend Purdue. The
t eammate received an appoint-
ment to W e s t Point so, not
wanting to return home empty-
handed, the scout talked to Bell.
A trip to West Lafayette, con-
bined with talks with the Pur-
due coaching staff and films of
the Rose Bowl victory convinced
Bell that the Boilermaker out-
fit was for him.
While he never really had any
football idols in h i g h school,
Bell liked to watch Penn State's
great end-Ted Kwalick. He does
notabelieve in mimicking other
ends. "Sure, you can try to imi-
tate them," he said. "But in the
end you have to do things the
way they come out best for you."
THINGS HAVE been coming
out near perfect for one Ashley
Bell. In his first Big Ten game
against Texas Christian he
hauled in two touchdown pass-
es. "I didn't know what to ex-
pect from the game," he said af-
terward. "I really surprised my-
self."
Bell continued to surprise
himself by catching passes
game after game. When he re-
corded Purdue's first t a 11 y
against Michigan State Satur-
day, it was his ninth touchdown
pass of the season. With this
reception he broke Purdue's all
time seasonal total w it h two
games still remaining. "I hadn't
thought about the record until a
few weeks ago," Bell admitted.
"I was really excited about
breaking it though."
Bell readily admits that when
he is in the game he "likes to
catch the b a 11." His favorite
play and the one w h i c h has
been the most successful this
year is to catch a Mike Phipps
pass across the middle.
BELL CONSIDERS himself
as more than just a pass catch-
er. "You can't just run with the

ball all the time," he explained.
"You have to be able to block."
He feels that it is particularly
important for tight ends to
block well when the line is in
tight formation. Blocking does
not always come easily for re-
ceivers but they "should work
at it."
Like most college standouts,
Bell's ultimate ambition is to
play professional ball. After that
he would like to use his Busi-
ness Economics background to
go into business with his father
or else in public relations.
Before settling into a career,
however, he would like to make
that Pasadena junket with his
Purdue teammates, preferably
this January, however, there are
several roadblocks, n o t a b l y
Michigan's Wolverines and the
Boilermakers' remaining games
with Indiana and Ohio State.
Because Purdue has the Big
Ten's best quarterback inhMike
Phipps and Ohio State has a
weak pass defense it seems pos-
sible that B e 11 will be doing
more receiving t h a n usual in
that game. He agreed but added,
"You still can't win if you don't
run well. We'll have to do both."
"I really think that we can
beat Ohio State," he concluded.
"If we do it won't be an indi-
vidual thing. It will have to be
a team effort." With the team
of Phipps and Bell going against
them the Buckeyes had better
beware.

-Daily-Randy Edmonds
B~ell prepares to block a Wolverine

BACK REWRITES BOOK:

--- d- -r srC ---- - - - -
I You don't have to carry a poster any more. Wear what you feel.U

Owens
By MARC LEVENTIIAL
At the University of Okla-
homa in Normnan they are look-
ing upon their fate much the
same as the disheartened de-
votes of Mudville, in ancient
lore.
Their mighty Casey did not
just strike out, but his inability
to carry the whole team, as any
all-American boy should be able
to do, amounts to the same dis-
illusionment.
Steve Owens, the contem-
porary hero, runs tailback for
the University of Oklahoma,
and just about its whole offense,
as well.
It wasn't exactly bases loaded
in the bottom of the ninth, with
two out, but with the loss this
past Saturday to Missouri, Ok-
lahoma has virtually no hope of
capturing the Big Eight title,
and consequently bowl hopes
have diminished. Stop Steve
Owens and you stop Oklahoma.

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heroics fail for Sooners

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Of course, in the Missouri game
he gained 109 yards in 29 car-
ries and one touchdown, which
is no disgrace.
In fact, Oklahoma got off to
a 10-0 lead, but that's all they
got as they lost 44-10. Missouri's
tailback, Joe Moore, outduelled
Owen, picking up 110 yards in
23 carries.
THE PREVIOUS week Owens
had noted that "it's sort of un-
believable. I haven't let this
pressure bother me too much,
though. I don't think about
how many times I carry, or how
many touchdowns I need or
how many yards I need." But
it's obvious that when you are
a "hero" and constitute the
whole team you'd better start
thinking "how many."
"But I'll say this--I'd carry
the ball 100 times if I had to, if
that's what it took to win,"
Owens added.
And that he has. No one in
college football has ever carried
the ball as often as Owens. His
carecer total now stands at 885,
surpassing the old record of 773
rushes set in the early 1950's by
Alan Ameeche of Wisconsin.
Records are becoming blase
for this 6'2", 213 pound senior
from Miami, Oklahoma. Owens
is closing in on all-time records
for rushing and scoring. He
needs 55 yards to surpass the
NCAA career rushing mark of
3.388 yards set by West Texas
State's Mercury Morris last
year, having already shattered
Gale Sayers Big Eight rushing
record.
JUST ONE touchdown will
give him the NCAA career mark
in that category, having already
tied, with 51. Glenn Davis of

A timely survey-
CONSCIENCE
IN AMERICA

That's a record that hasn't been
touched in more than 20 years,
Davis having run for the Army
from 1944 to 1946. All of this is
within Owens' grasp with three
games remaining.
Owens is fourth in the coun-
try in rushing offense, having
played seven games and rushed
for 990 yards in 238 plays. He is
only 24 yards behind Moore of
Missouri, of all people. He is
currently averaging 34 carries a
game for 141 yards and 4.2
yards per carry.
This brings us to an interest-
ing topic, the Heisman Trophy,
awarded to the outstanding col-
lege football player in the game.
He and Mike Phipps, Purdue's
outstanding quarterback, are
the leading candidates.
Owens is not on the most suc-
cessful team, which could hurt
his chances, but his big claim
is his three year record, which
not only could match anybody's,
but tops most. As a sophomore
he gained 808 yards, 1536 as a
junior, and 990 yards thus far
this season.
WITH SUCH proficiency in
one art it is needless to say that
football is Owens' only hobby.
He is a business major at Okla-
homa, and that talent surely
will not be wasted when his un-
avoidable future of pro football
necessitates counting all that
money.
Owens appears to be headed
much in the same mold as Jim
Taylor, during his great play-
ing days with the Green Bay
Packers. The Sooner tailback
possesses agility and durability,
but not sprinter speed. He can
run inside and outside, and for
Oklahoma, often has to. Like
Taylor, his endurance could
probably enable Owens to look
forward to nine or ten years in
the pros.
But the Missouri game still
clouds the mind of the sceptic.
He chooses to ignore the Steve
Owens that was picked Back of
the Week by the AP for his No-
vember 1 game against Iowa
A CORRECTION
The Daily Sports staff sin-
cerely regrets the atrocious error
made in yesterday's Gridde Pick-
ings story.
The guest selector was not
Howard Hughes, but Iowa's
junior Senator Harold Hughes.
Senator Hughes, is one of the
Senate's leading doves, and dur-
ing the 1968 Democratic Con-
vention, he nominated Eugene
McCarthy for the presidency.

State. He ran for 248 yards and
four touchdowns, completed his
only pass, and caught a pass for
15 more yards. Owens eclipsed
Oklahoma's all-time game rec-
orI of 218 yards set by Jim
Grisham jn 1963. Owens carried
53 times in that game, also a
school record.
IN THE MODE of the Mud-
ville fan, one might still ask
what has he done for us lately.
Owens has answered by scoring'
four touchdowns in a single
game three times this season.
In his last sixteen Saturdays
of football he has gained over
100 yards. But to keep his streak
going, it should be noted, Okla-
homa gave him the ball on six
consecutive plays in the waning
moments against Colorado to
pick up his norm, and much the
same happened against Mis-
souri. But this is vicariously ad-
mitting the impossibility of a
single man carrying a football
team to victory.
Steve Owens has had to run
against Texas, Colorado, Kan-
sas State, and Missouri this sea-
son, all of whom have a com-
bined record of 24-6. Unlike
mighty Casey, it was not Steve
Owens that let the team down,
it was the team that let the in-
dividual down.
Stanford president
blacklists BYU
STANFORD, Calif. ()P) - Stan-
ford University President Kenneth
S. Pitzer yesterday barred a n y
new commitments to athletic
competition with Brigham Young
University or any other Institu-
tions sponsored by the Morman
Church.
The ruling will not affect the two
basketball games scheduled with
Brigham Young in December 1970.
Acting on recommendations of
the Stanford human relations
commission, headed by law pro-
fessor Byron Sher, Pitzer said:
"Top officials of the Church
of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day
Saints, which sponsors Brigham
Young University have told Stan-
ford University officers that the
church currently has policies stat-
ing that no Negro African lineage
may have the right of priesthood.
"So long as this policy remains
in effect, it is my opinion that
is constitutes discrimination on
the basis of race within the mean-
ing of the guidelines established
by the human relations commis-
sIon."

Mail to:
Century Expanded, 301 East 22 Street, New York, New York 10010
I have enclosed $ plus 35 handling charge per shirt,
No COD's, no cash please. Immediate delivery.
Name____
Address _ __
_-City._ - State Zip
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Cll ege --____________MR M o n = 1Qa ____ _i_

A Documentary History
of Conscientious Objection
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Edited by
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Especially pertinent for to-
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are not essays or tracts;
they are the real responses
of men who undertook
conscientious objection in
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Cloth, $6.50; Paper, $2.75
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{

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Friday, Nov. 14-7:30 p.m.
2 "INIVIDUAL VC S C LFCTIVF EwTLI I'

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