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November 13, 1969 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-13

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Thursday, November 13, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page (Nine

Thursday, November 1 3, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

2nd in Fall Film Series
Students for Educational Innovation
AND
Clonlara School
PRESENT
"CHILDREN AS PEOPLE"
a film about Fayerweather Street School
Cambridge, Massachusetts
o Summerhill-inspired, open curriculum
school for elementary-acie children
WITH
a discussion following headed by
MADISON JUDSON, founder
of Fayerweather St. School
THURSDAY, NOV. 13, 1969
Education School (Corner Monroe & East University)

Music, culture convention hosts
African, Near East exhibitions

By ROBERT JERRO
"Ethnomusicology" may be a
strange concept for you, but for
a group of linguists, anthropol-
ogists, sociologists, psychologists
and musicologists it means a
life's dedication to the study of
the relationship of music and
cultures throughout the world.
This group of scholars will be
assembling for the fourteenth
annual convention of the So-
ciety for Ethnomusicology here
Friday through Sunday. The
convention will be held with the
cooperation of the music school
and the Extension Service.
The convention, hosted by the
Society's treasurer, music Prof.
William Malm, promises to be
exotic, educational, and enter-
taming.
The convention begins on Fri-
day morning with a presenta-
tion of papers on the various
black, Indian, and Anglo-Amer-
ican musical cultures of North
and South America. This will be

followed by discussionso
and a demonstration of
rican Mbira, or thumb p
a Rhodesian expert.
The afternoon will
papers by German a.
Guinean scholars on th
and comparison of the
styles of various South
Islands. It will conclud
demonstration of the P1
kulingtan gongs, using
from the University's c
In the evening, Aalm
ranged for an informal
tation of films and tap
society members migh
brought with them. Th
of the material will
known until it is show:
will be more or less a
show."
The day will conclude
grand demonstration o
Sociability of Ethnom
gists at Receptions"
Sheraton Motor Inn.
The Near East will bet

Schorling Aud.

8:00 P.M

$1.00

THE BLACK STUDENTS UNION PRESENTS
The 1st annual Black Artist's Festival

I

BLACK

ISO..

Even the
Establishment

featuring
VAL WARD--Actress-"Medium Cool"
DON L. LEE-Poet-Author--"Don't Cry, Scream"
JAMES JOHNSON-Dramatist-"Cage of Faith"
ASANTI--Dancers and Drummers
JON LOCKARD--Nationally known Black artist
OSCAR GRAVES-Nationally known Black sculptor
In the UNION BALLROOM 10 AXM.-7:30 P.M.
" an open discussion with the artists
"RACISM AND THE ARTS"
" exhibits by Black painters, sculptors, photographers,
and craftsmen
* music, drama, poetry, art workshops

on dance centration on Saturday morn-
the Af- ing, when papers on aspects of
iano, by Persian music and relationship
of music and the structure of
feature town life in northern Afghanis-
nd New tan will be presented.
he study After this, the Arabic "UD,"
musical the instrument most character-
Pacific istic of the Near East, will be
e with a explained and played.
hilippine In the afternoon, a panel dis-
g gongs cussion on music education and
ollection. ethnomusicology will try to
has ar- throw light on one of the big-
presen- gest problems for the society.
es which Malm says the problem is "how
ht have to present the vast and deep
e nature knowledge of music cultures
not be possessed by the society's mem-
sr, s it bers in a simple enough way to
surPrise those willing to teach it to the
less knowledgeable."
e with a After this, an examination of
n The differene African musical styles
nusicolo- and a study of the role of the
at the drum in those styles will con-
the con- clude the afternoon's presenta-
Stions.
What Malm considers to be
the distinctive part of the pro-
gram will occur in the evening
in Hill Aud.: a concert of Mich-
igan f o I k music, featuring a
hammer dulcimer player. This
promises ,.to be novel not only
for the convention but also for
Michigan residents themselves.
This will be followed by an
equally unique demonstration by
the University Javanese Game-
lan Orchestra accompanied by a
genuine guest Javanese dancer,
Hardja Susilo.
On Sunday, t h e convention
will conclude with a discussion
by American and African sch-
olars from diverse fields on the
"Role of Music in Socio-Cul-
tural change." T h e discussion
will focus on underdeveloped
,S countries where operas and
ground beating may occur side
by side as legitimate means of
. musical expression.
All programs with the excep-
tion of Saturday night's willbe
'r held on the 4th floor of t h e
r Rackham Bldg. Registration will
.< cost $5 and will take place Fri-
day morning in the Rackham
Building lobby. Anyone may
register and attend.
RENT
ECONO-CAR
STEM , 1 low price for a
- I fell 9A..hnir norinri

.1

i

Grooves

0 0

-Daily-Jim Sener
Ta~lntpays tup
A Hollywood television appearance as well as the chance to win up to $5,000 encouraged participants
in the All-American College Show yesterday. The auditions were hosted by Arthur Godfrey and were
held in the Union Ballroom.
BLACK COLLEGES CANNOT COMPETE:
Major universities recruit blacK
faculty fSotherncoles

When it come
to the hip plac
to bank
Ann Arbor Bank.
for whatever
rings you
chimes, baby

In TRUEBLOOD AUDITORIUM
4 P.M.-6 P.M. and 8 P.M.-10 P.M.

two shows

0 Black poetry, drama, African drums
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 15
Tickets will be sold only for the performance in Trueblood
Donation: $1.50 (Children $1.00)
TICKETS SOLD AT:
Ann Arbor Art Centre, Inc.
215 S. Fourth
2bl-8028
TRUEBLOOD AUDITORIUM
Frieze Buildinq

ANN ARBOR BANK
4 CAMPUS OFFICES
"Fast LUnY ty reet NarMaynrd~~
*Sou'th Unverstyat East U've,rs y
" Media? Cnter Forstat Ann!
" Pt~mnuth Road at Huo ar kway
And 9 More 01ticee Servitig'
il ]3ANN AIFIOR!IJE.XI'EH
VI'IITM0HE LAKE
MEMBER: FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION " FEDERAL RESERVE SYSI

ATLANTA, Ga. P -Predomi-
nantly black colleges in the South
are feeling significant effects of
raids on their staffs by major col-
leges and universities intensifying
their search for black faculty
members.
"We're going to have to offer
them anywhere from $18,000 to
$22,000 annually to keep them and,
that's more than we can afford,"
says Dr. Edward J. Brantley, vice
president of Clark College in At-
lanta.
The recruiting is not being done
only by white institutions. A num-
ber of college presidents said big
name black universities are re-
cruiting in smaller black schools,
too.
"Money is undoubtedly the sin-
gle biggest attraction to our black
teachers who leave to join white
institutions," said Dr. Luther Fos-
ter, president of Tuskegee Insti-
tute.
Howard University in Washing-
ton, D.C., says it has lost half a

SUBSCRIBE TO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

lul -11£.7IIuUI 1UI lUU
free pick-up in
Washtenaw County
761-8845
438 W. Huron
Ann Arbor

dozen key professors to the lure of1
higher salaries.
While most of the black collegei
presidents contacted felt money,
was the biggest attraction, Dr.'
Vincent Harding, who heads the
Martin Luther King, Jr., Memor-
ial Center in Atlanta, says most
are leaving for the chance to do
serious research in black studies.-
Many of the large, predominant-,
ly white institutions are seeking
directors and instructors for their
black studies programs. Particular-
ly affected is Howard University's
41-year-old Department of Afri-
can Studies.
Most of the college presidents
also felt that the recruiting of
their black staff was significant,
but not critical. Harding feels oth-
erise.
"I think it is critical now, more
than college presidents realize,"s
Harding said.
"In many cases, the black!
schools are going to have to get
more money than they ever had1
before or move into a fuller ex-
perience on black studies than
they ever have," he said.
"We find that in the Institute'
of Black World-that part of the
King Memorial Center concernedI
wtih serious research in black stu-
dies-we've had no difficulty at-
tracting black scholars," said Har-
ding.
A survey of top officials of the'
six predominantly black colleges
which make up the Atlanta Uni-
versity Center disclosed they haveI
had some difficulty but nothing
critical in their black faculty loss.'
Hugh Gloster, president of

ANN ARBOR ART ASSOCIATION
annual
ONE-DAY CRAFT SALE
Friday, November 14-10 A.M.-9 P.M.
Parker Room, YM-YWCA
350 South Fifth Avenue, Ann Arbor
Ceramics, enamels, glass, jeawelry .
mosaics, photography, prints,
scnlptnre, textiles
-> o<-y>o<-y>o<-= > o<-y>o<--yo<->o<-=>o<-=>o<-=>( <=-y>o

Morehouse College, King's alma
mater, said white applicants for
faculty outnumber blacks 10 to 1.
"The number of black teachers
available is considerably smaller
than it was prior to 1960. Since
then, predominantly white insti-
tutions have been recruiting Mack
faculty members much more vig-
orously," said Gloster.
Some predominantly white in-
stitutions, he added, seek black
faculty members "to provide racial
window dressing for their schools
and to comply with federal re-
quirements of nondiscriminatory
employment."
And, Gloster said, not only are
white schools recruiting black in-
structors, but government and bus-
iness are too. "They're offering
salaries higher than we're able to
afford."
Morehouse has lost one faculty
member in political science to a
college in Connecticut and ano-
ther, an English professor, to an
Indiana college.
"As president of Morehouse, I
have been approached by several
white colleges about joining these
institutions as president, vice pre-
sident or academic dean," Gloster
said.
He thinks the black colleges in
Atlanta have not had as much dif-
ficulty in losing black faculty as
other colleges "because of our re-
putation and location in Atlanta."
Gloster said the recruiting of
black faculty to teach Afro-Amer-
ican studies and to counsel black
students does not sufficiently in-
volve the professor in the academ-
ic life of the predominantly white
college.
This, he said, "is a sideline de-
velopment which has come about
as a result of protests of black
students and their demand for
such programs."
Tuskegee Institute has lost a
few faculty members--their drain
has been in the field of science,
Tuskegee's specialty.
The president of Tuskegee ech-
oed Brantley's concern about be-
ing able to pay high enough salar
ies to keep their best professors.
"In an effort to maintain our
position, we've had to pay higher
salaries than we're able to pay,"
Foster said. "Even so, they're low-
er than they ought to be."
Fisk University, in Nashville,
Tenn., says it has had no faculty
losses to white institutions but
g e t s weekly inquiries about its
black professors.

7i

7

Yes, hearing is believing at the Quarry when you're
listening to the Panasonic Barrington Stereo Radio.
Now you can have full rich stereo at a price that
sounds as good.
The Panasonic Barrington; elegantly handcrafted
wood cabinetry complete with output jacks for tape-
recording and input jacks for a Panasonic turntable
at only $39.95 or a tape deck at only $49.95.
featuring...
" AM/FM and FM Stereo radio.
* Illuminated or "Black-Out" dial face
" Separate 62" speaker system
" 12 watt PMP
" Separate bass; treble controls
" Tuned RF stage for F
A FET tuner
And it might be the perfect gift idea at only

Dynimic social Chornes In Jdapnil, India, aid US.
Trhrough the BAHA I Faith
THURS., Nov. 13, 7 & 9 p.m. UGLI Multipurpose Room Mark's
SPONSOR: Baha'i Student Group in cooperation with the O.R.A.

------------------- I

it's

HA PPENING

THE ED. SCHOOL

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