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November 11, 1969 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-11

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Tuesday, November 11, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Tuesday, Movember 11, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Against
Th e WalI
The Olympics .. .
.. Washington 1969
By BILL DINNER
Although Olympics are usually held every four years, the
international committee, in an emergency meeting, voted un-
animously last night to hold the 1969 games in the nation's
capital this weekend.
Au unprecedented number of participants are expected,
though the official figures were not released. Reliable estimates
run as high as a million. Approximately 300,000 referees will be
on hand, courtesy of the United States Government.
The Wolverines main competitors for the number one spot
appear to be Harvard, Columbia, Berkeley-UCLA, and Madison,
and pre-season polls pick Michigan as the dark horse contender.
The Crimson, with their general strike of last year, and
their building takeovers the past two years may be resting on
their laurels. Meanwhile the Berkeley-UCLA tribe have demon-
strated their power over the fight for Communist Party member
Angela Davis. On the otherhand, Washington feels that the best
show may be from those raggled Badgers.
Although the Wolverines have shown some power in the
recent bookstore controversy, their full potential is simply not
known.
Recent surveys have noted that the fight could be rough,
and all Michigan competitors are urged to arrive early with
protective helmets in order to have a opportunity to test their
strength in practice.
Presently there are eight official events. Of course more
may be added at the discretion of the referees, since Uncle Sam
always knows best.
For the benefit of newcomers the planned events are sum-
med up below.
THE BRICK THROW: Any size brick will be acceptable,
however the judges will give special consideration to participants
who use cinder blocks. Windows on local buildings are worth
one point apiece, while government property will earn 3 per
pane. Hitting the refs, mistakenly or not, is foul play, but is
guaranteed to gain endearment from the crowd.
MACE-OR-NOT SHUFFLE: This long valued sport is quite
similar to the ancient 200 yard shuttle run and attempts to
measure speed, while placing special emphasis on agility and
reflexes. The game begins by one of the refs throwing a canister
and a player deftly throws it back. The canister landing closest
to the refs receives the highest prize. Abeited attempts will be
punished with expulsion from the crowd.
THE STEEPLE CHASE: Will probably be restricted to
people who participated in the brick throw, or mace-or-not
shuffle, but an over reaction by the refs could open it up to
everyone. One point will be awarded for every barricade suc-
cessfully cleared while being chased by a ref. However, if after
finishing the chase, a contestant is stopped by a ref he goes
directly to jail and does not collect 200 dollars.
THE POLE VAULT: Open to all contestants who have upset
the refs, main object is to vault through second story window
in attempt to escape. One additional point for every floor, minus
10 for landing in army helicopter.
BREATH HOLDING AND HANKERCHIEF PULLING: con-
test begins if attempt to score on mace-or-not shuffle fails,
points will be awarded for the fewest tears and rashes. Space
suits are not allowed, and any contestant who collapses will be
disqualified.
GATE CRASHING: For those courageous soles, three points
will be presented on certification of every embassy gate broken
in attempt to seek asylum. Fifteen points for successful break-
through of the White House fense, along with 16 counts of con-
tempt of court and four years in jail. Minus five points for the
Smithsonian, but 100,000 dollars from the black market for every
Rembrandt.
DUELING: Six points for every defeated ref, 27 points for a
tape recording of refs yelling "long live Mao," and 41 points for
a hammer and sickle etched in blood.
ROOM STUFFING: Although no official points will be
awarded, honorable mention will go to all people who fit more
than 29 kids into less than a ten by eight flop house, in addition
two gold stars if no one gets to sleep.
Good luck to all, and to all a good fight.

Iowa holds key to

rose

hopes

The race for the roses is down
to two. r
And chances are that Saturday
will produce an unofficial winner.
Michigan's solid, but tedious
57-0 victory over Illinois and Pur- "'. RA D
due's 41-13 de-spartanizing of
Michigan State made the Wolver-
ines and the Boilermakers the on- by robin Wr IC
ly eligible contestants left.
Michigan moves on this week to
meet on-again, off-again Iowa
Hawkeyes, who lost miserably to what happens the last week of Comparing Iowa with Michi-
Minnesota 35-8, but came back competition. The worst that can gan's contender for the Rose Bowl
last week to knock the Indiana happen is that the Wolverines will invitation. Schembechler s a i d,{
Hoosiers out of the race, 28-17.-j lose their last game to Ohio State "Iowa has the best offense we've
Purdue, whose only loss of the and therefore tie for second place met since Purdue.
season has been at the hands of with the Boilermakers. In evaluating the possible out-
the Wolverines, must take on The traditional rule-that the come, the Michigan coach remark-
IWMichigan beats Iowa and team who hasn't gone in the long- ed, "Although Iowa's had some bad
OhioSatepullsetough wit est time gets the bid-favors Mich- games, they have the ability to
oin as expected, it wont matter igan, who hasn't gone since 1965. really come on strong. Against
Purdue went in 1967. Michigan State and Indiana par-
So, as Coach Bo Schembechler ticularly, they have played well

monotonous game at Illinois Sat-
urday with an interception that
,went for a 40 yard touchdown,
agreed with his coach.
"Iowa ha' fine personnel.
They' e capab.i of l ying a real-
ly. good gamle, It'll be a tough

i
i
i
i
I

match.
"Although they have an incon-
sistent record, we know we're not
the type of team that can afford
to overlook anyone," he added.
Elliott acknowledged that with
only two games left and the Rose
Bowl in view, the team is also
looking ahead to Ohio State.
"We're not convinced they're
unbeatable. They may not be the
sTper human team people have
imade them out to be," he added,
W-, Ten stwidiiigs
Conference All
Games Games

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
BILL DINNER

appropriately understated, "This is and won.
really a key week, what happens .'Michigan has been playing a
Saturday will determine our fate." better defensive game lately, al-I
The Wolverine mentor con- though they haven't confronted. an
tinued, "We're really going to have offense like Iowa's. It's hard to;
to be up for this one. We'll have to evaluate our potential on the basis
be at full strength. of the last three weeks comipeti-
"This'll be a tough game. They tion," he added.
have a good offense, and they're ; BtId elwev enal
.o d "But I do feel we've been able
playing a stronger defensive gamea to eliminate many of our incon-

Ohio State
Purdue
MICIIGAN
Iicdiana
Iowa
Minnesota
N'western
Wisconsin
Mich. State
Illinois

'%V L
5 0
4 1
4 1
3 2
2 3
2 3
2 3
2 3
1 4
0 5

T W
0' 7
0 7
0 6
0 4
0 4
0 2
0 2
0 2
0 3
0 0

IT
0 0
1 0
2 0
4 0
4 0
5 1
6 0
6 0
5 0
8 0

-Associated Press
( a foulghly barrels through the Illini
Professional Standings

no.'

Aatianal collegiate standings

IVY LEAGUE3
Conference All games
WL T WL T

Kentucky 1 4 0
Mississippi state 0 3 0
SOUTHWEST

sistencies. And we'll really be up
for this game because we know
there's so much at stake. We'll
> U have our hands full out there," hek
5 o concluded.
Defensive back Bruce Elliott,
0 0 1 who brightened an otherwise

Saturday's games
MICIIIGAN at Iowa
Illinois at Wisconsin
Indiana at Northwestern
Minnesota at Michigan State
Purdue at Ohio State

N 111L
Fast Division
W 3 ''Pt. GF GA

Dartmouth
Princeton
Yale
Cornell
Harvard
Penn
Brown
Columbia

t

ATLANTIC
South Carolina
Clemson
No. Carolina State
North Carolina
Duke
Maryland
Wake Forest
Virginia

5 0 0
4 1 0
3 2 0
2 3 0
1 4 0
0 5 0
4 0 0
3 1 1
2 10
2 3 1
2 3 0
2 4 0
1 1 0

7
5
5
3
3
3
1
0

0
2
4
4
4
6
7

0'
o i
0
o
olI
0':

Arkansas
Texas
TCU
Texas T'
SMU
Texas A
Baylor
nice
Utah
Arizona
Brigham
Wy oming
Arizona
Texas El
Colorado
New 3e

4 0 0
3 2 0
ech 3 2 0
2 3
& ,2 3 0t
0 4 0
\WESTERN ATHLETIC
4 0 0
State 3 1 0
Young 142 0
1 2 0
I Paso 2 4 0
State U. 0 3 o
xico 0 5
MID-AMERICA

5
6
7
6

i
o'
o'
0!
0

New ork
Ii 't r .iL
SAlontri'al
Bo0sto1
(Chlicago
T1oronlto

S
C,
4

41
:3
3
s

1
.a

18
17
17
17
11
10

EdPEik s

0,
0
Ii
o
1
0
0
U

45
37
50
47
33
35

o Not everybody will be in the District (of Columbia) Saturday.
o There is sure to be enough action to spread across this great democracy
! of ours. And some of it, indubitably, will take place on the gridirons
o where armed men will confront each other, and those with god on
o their side are just gonna have'ta win.
0 Pick the righteous ones and you will have won a Cottage Inn
pizza disc, just like Richard Armstrong of Mary Markley Hotel can
eat this week. Coach Bo Schembechler sets a fine example below:

West Division
St. Lois 5 4 4 14 4
Minnesota 5 6 1 11
Oakland 4 7 2 102
Ph1ladelplia 2 3 6 102
Pittsburg;h 2 7 3 7 2
Los Angeles, 3 7 0 6 2
testerday's Results
Montreal at Los Angeles, inc.
Boston 8, Oakland 3
* * 4 -
N B A
: IV L Pct.
New York 14 1 .933
haltimtore 8 6 .571

37
29
32
37
28
45
35
45
49
32
37
32

47
35
27
22

Milwaukee 7 6
Philadelphia 5 6
Detroit 5 6
Cincinnati 5 8
Boston 3 7
Western Division
Atlanta 9 3
San Francisco 6 4
Chicago 6 5
Los Angeles 5 5
Phoenix. 5 6
Seattle 3 8
San Diego 1 9

.538
.455
.455
.385
.300
.750
.600
.545
.500
.455
.273
.100

6
7
8
8' 5
2
2j/2
3
31r
7

Yesterday's Results
San Diego vs. San Francisco at Salt
Lake City, inc.
Chicago vs. Atlanta at Auburn, Ala.,
inc..

lll
Missouri
Nebraska
Colorado
Kansas St.
Oklahoma
Oklahoma State
Iowa State
Kansas

G EIGHT
4 1
4 1I
3 2
3 2
2?
2 2
1 4
0 5

0
0
0
u
0
0
0

Memphis
North Te
Tulsa
Cincinnat
Louisville
Wichita S
Southern
UCLA
Stanford
Oregon
California
Oregon S
Washingtc
NVashingtc
Tennessee
LSU
Florida
Auburn
Georgia
Mississipp
Vanderbilt
Alabama

MISSOURI VALLEY
State 3 0 0
xas State 3 0
i 2 3 0
0 2 0
tate 0 2 0
PACIFIC EIGHT
California 4 0 0
4 1 1
2 1 0
tate 2 3 0
on 0 5 0
on State 0 5 0
SOUTHEASTERN
3 1 0
2 1 1
3 2 0
2 220
i 2 2 0
t 220
2 30

Tloledo
i Bowling Green
0 Miami (Ohio)
O Ohio
W Mich'igan
0 en Sategg ,
0MAJOR IND
0 Penn State
0 Boston U
0 W. Virginia
0 Notre Dame
0' Florida State
0 Air Forces
0 VXilanova
1 HIoustoni
0 Colgate
Buffalo
1 West Texas State
IRutgers
1 Syracuse
1 New Mexico State
0 Army
o M iami(Florida)
0 Northern Illinois
0 Pittsburgh
Georgia 'Tech
0 so. Mississippi
0 Dayton
1 Boston College
0 Virginia Tech
1 'Tulane
0 Utah State
0 Marshall
0' Navy

5 0 0
'I 1 1 1
2 3 0
1 .4 0
0 41 0

0
)
i
l
1
I
0
t)
l
0
p
Or
0
Y'
a
0

;
!
U

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.

MICHIGAN at Iowa
Purdue at OHIO STATE
MINNESOTA at Michigan St.
Indiana at NORTHWESTERN
Illinois at WISCONSIN
PITTSBURGH at Army
YALE at Princeton
Miami (Fla.) at ALABAMA
Auburn at GEORGIA
TENNESSEE at Mississippi
CLEMSON at North Carolina
IIOUSTON at North Carolina
State
Duke at VIRGINIA TECH
Oklahoma St. at COLORADO
MISSOURI at Iowa State
NEBRASKA at Kansas State

17.
18.
19
S20.

'TEXAS A&M at Rice
UTAH at Arizona
Air Force at STANFORD
COAST GUARD at Lebanon
Valley

I

Today's Games
Seattle at Chicago
Detroit at Los Angeles
G l, New York at San Francisco
- Philadelphia at Atlanta
5' :Milwaukee at Boston

The 1st Annual BLACK ARTISTS' FESTIVAL
featuring
VAL WARD--DON L. LEE-JAMES JOHNSON-
JON LOCKARD-DOROTHY ASHBY-OSCAR GRAVES

I

0

o,
a,
a,
a
a
0
0
0'

g I
i JOIN U
FOR
8 Days- Nights
OF
Fun, Frolic, and Foolery
IN
SANJUAN
$269.00
DEC. 28-JAN. 4
Includes:
* Round Trip Jet
Air Fore
* Seven Nights
Accommodations at
Luxurious Holiday
Inn
* Gala New Year's
Eve Party
Call
Ruth Ellis-483-7803
Ronna Babcock-483-7803
Kim Mobley---483-2992

Black poetry, drama, African drums
Panel discussion-"RACISM & THE ARTS"
Music, drama, poetry, art workshops
Exhibits by Black painters, sculptors,
photogrophers, and croftsmen
Tickets on sale at Ann Arbor Art Centre, Inc.
215 S Fourth
662-8028
Donation: $1.50 (Children $1.00)
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 15

F

p.

V

I

RADICAL CAUCUS
MEETING
Tuesday 8:00
3529 S.A.B.

Stand up for what
you know is right. Stand up and
be counted.Don't let anyone make up your mind for you.
You know the issues. Be sure you vote and vote for what
you're sure is right. Make your vote count. Vote NO! on
the bookstore referendum November 10 and 11.

Grads and Undergrads
VOTING STATIONS OPEN 9-5
ENGINEERING ARCH
UGLI
FISHBOWL
DIAG
UNION
Also at the Following Schools:
EAST ENGINEERING BLDG.-N and S Main Entrances, 9-5
NURSING SCHOOL-Main Lobby, 9-5
MEDICAL SCHOOL-Student Lounge, 12-3
MUSIC SCHOOL-Main Entrance, 11-3:30
EDUCATION SCHOOL-Main Lobby, 9-4
BUSINESS SCHOOL-Main Lobby, 9-3:30
LAW QUAD-100 Hutchins Hall, 9-3

I

Subscribe To
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 764-0558
NEW MOBE Presents
Artists Against the War
TONIGHT AT 8 P.M.
}t{BUYi OUSE

FoIletts, Overbecks, Slaters, Ulrichs, Wahrs

I

LEGISLATIVE CONTROL
and
UNIVERSITY AUTONOMY
A Forum Starring:
3 State Representatives
Larry Lindemer (Board of Regents)
VOICE YOUR OPINION ON:
_ Y t _ - - .- - TU- -

POETS

FOLK SINGERS

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