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November 07, 1969 - Image 10

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Page Teri

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, November 7, 1969

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, November 7, 1969

__...

NO CHANGE PREDICTED

.":s:5: :;:z i r; ;::::::..:r : : : :::'.: ;...*.: Approval request forms for student
sponsored events are available in
DAILY OFFICIAL Rooms 1001 and 1546 of the Student
Activities Building.

Expert views

U. S.

China

policy

By GARY SOLOMON indications of the mood of the
The administration's highest- Peking government.
ranking China official predicted "In looking for signals from
yesterday that "prospects for the Chinese, you have to be con-
significant change in U.S.-Chi- tent with rather meager fare,"
nese relationships are not great he said.
at this time." In China's apparent attempt
State Department official Paul to seek reconciliation with the
Kreisberg, speaking before an Soviets, Kreisberg 'saw a soften-
almost full Rackham Aud. last ing in China's previous reluct-
night on "The Nixon adminis- ance to depart from basic prin-
tration's Perceptions of China," ciples. From the Sino-Soviet
said, however, that his views border dispute there is perhaps
were not to be considered of- a new policy emerging-that of
ficial. "put forth principle, maintain
"It is inconceivable in the long it, but deal with pratical prob-
run that the U.S. can continue lems," he said.
to ignore a country as large and What needs to be determined,
with as much potential as the he noted, is if this change in
People's Republic of China," policy applies to U.S. relations
Kreisberg said. as well as Sino-Soviet relations.
"Our position on Chinese rep- Kreisberg was questioned by a
resentation in the United Na- panel consisting of three mem-
tions will be the same this year bers of the political science de-
as in the past," he added, how- partment. Moderating the panel
ever. was political science Prof. Allen
Kreisberg discussed the dif- S. Whiting, a former member of
ficulty in receiving significant the State Department.
MIT demonstrators
hit militar research
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (Iw--About 250 protesters blocked a corridor
outside the office of President Howard W. Johnson of the Mas-
sachusetts Institute of Technology for three hours yesterday in an
antiwar demonstration.
The blockade of the corridor was made despite a court injunction
barring obstruction of any university facility.
Provost Jerome B. Weisner was shouted down when he asked
demonstrators to clear the path to Johnson's locked and empty office
in the MIT administration building.
There was no damage in the corridor although the demonstrators'
littered it with papers and tacked up wall posters reading "building
condemned."
The demonstrators demand an end to all classified research in
off-campus labs, and also an end to studies of communism and other'
projects at the Center for International Studies.
The demonstrators took over the corridor after marching across
the street from a rally which filled 1,250-seat Kresge Auditorium with
MIT students and faculty. Not all of those present supported the
demands.
Prof. Paul E. Gray, associate provost, estimated that "not more
than 20 per cent" of the protesters were MIT students.
The demonstration was led by the November Action Coalition
(NAC) a group of Greater Boston protest organizations.
Gray said MIT students taking part in the demonstrations could
be liable to disciplinary action or arrest and those non-students taking
part could be liable to arrest for trespass.
Protesters crying "Get the pig press" scuffled with news photo-
graphers in the main lobby. Coats were thrown over cameras and
some newsmen's lights were dashed to the floor.
During yesterday's sit-in outside eight empty administration of-
fices a smaller group showed films of student unrest and Viet Cong
soldiers.
The rest of the four-wing building, which has an estimated five
miles of corridors, was not disturbed.
FUN WORKING IN EUROPE

BULLETIN
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7
Day Calendar
Physics - Astronomy. Astronomy Col-
loquium: George Brandie, "An Ex-
cess of Surface Density of Extra Gal-
actic Radio Sources at 8 GHz"; 296 P
& A Bldg., 4:00 p.m.
Botany Seminar: Dr. David Fair-
brothers, Rutgers, "Chemosystenatics
and Proteins as Taxonomic Charact-
ers"; Botanical Gardens, 4:10 p.m.
General Notices
A representative from the Ohio State
Law school will be on campus today!
to talk with interested students. Info:
764-0312.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL
The approval of the following stu-
dent sponsored events becomes effec-
tive after the publication of this notice.3
All publicity for these events must
be withheld until the approval has
become effective.

Chinese Students Club, movie.No-
vember 7, 1969, 7:30 - 9:30, Natural
Science Aud.
UM Scottish Country Dance Society.
Wednesday, 8:00-10:30 - WAB - In-
struction given - Beginners welcome.
South and Southeast Asia Club
BrownhBag, November 7, 12:00 noon,
Lane Hall Commons Room, Speaker:
Mrs. K. Aga-Oglu, History of Art and
Curator, Division of Orientalia, Mu-
seum of Anthropology, "Chinese Ppr-
celains Discovered in Archeological
sites in the Philippines" - a slide
talk.
Placement Service
Register for the following interviews
to be held at Summer Placement Ser-
vice, 212 SAB on the following dates:
November 12, Wednesday: Camp Mat-
apone, girls camp in Maine. From 10-
3. Openings for waterfront, a nd s-
ports, arts, nature, and campcraft, pre-
fer over 20 age.
IBilrch trails,
November 13, Thursday, Camp Birch
Trails, Wisconsin, for girls. From 10-
5. Openings in arts and crafts, g y m-
nastics, tripping, water ballet, a n d
tennis.
Join The Daily

"AVAILABLE AT DRUG STORES EVERYWHERE"
WITH,
r SOCIA8LES'
MOUTHWASH TABLET!

Pal Kreisberg

#/11/el
ALL U

JOIN THE SPORT OF THE SPACE AGE
PARACHUTING SERVICE
TECUMSEH, MICHIGAN
Michigan's Most Active
Sport Parachuting Center
Saturday, Sunday, Holidays
-For Information Call-
MON.-FRI.-291 -3634
WEEKENDS-423-7720
ENJOY SKYDIVING AT ITS BEST
Classes Start i 11:00 Sat. & Sun.

T

G

FRIDAY, NOV. 7
4-5 P.M.

'5
3'

Music, Food, Drinks

HILLEL HOUSE
1429 H ill St.

i "

WOW!
A three-piece Treasure Chest
chicken dinrer, plus french tries,
for only 79! Larger take-horme
orders also. Try a box soon !
IM i ST E Ru &
/MILING SPEEDY ERVtCE
West of Arborland

GOOD,

FOOD

Is

WAITING
-.~
*0

FURl

YOU

LUNCHES, DINNE
512 E. WILLI
(Across from Tow
FAST, FREE DE
5 P.M.-2 A
NO 3-3379 or N

Get out and vote
against the few who under the
assumption of saving the students of the University of
Michigan 1% on core books will take over $175,000 out
of their pockets. Vote November 10 and 11.
Vote NO on the bookstore referendum.

RS, SNACKS
AM ST.
wer Plaza)
LIvERY
4.M.
10 3-5902
P/Z ZE RI IA-

GUARANTEED JOBS ABROAD! Get paid, travel, meet people,
SUMMER and YEAR ROUND. 20 countries, 9 paying job cate-
gories offered. For FREE cultural program literature including
details and applications, write: ISIS, Admissions, 133 rue Hotel
des Monnaies, Brussels 6, Belgium. A Non-Profit Student Mem-
bership Organization.

GREEK ART
IN THE KITCHEN OF THANO'S LAMPLIGHTER
BRINGS CONTINENTAL EXCELLENCE TO YOUR
EVERY DINING EXPERIENCE AT
THANO'S LAMPLIGHTERO
c 2421 East Liberty-Seven Days a Week
Old ileidelber
1 1_1:N MrinC -rR_71: 91

.1

I'

DeLong's Pit Barbecue
FEATURES THESE DINNERS:

{

Folletts, Overbecks, Slaters, Ulrichs, Wafirs -

Bar-B-Q Ribs
Bar-B-Q Chicken
Bar-B-Q Beef
Bar-B-Q Pork

Shrimp
Scallops
Fried Chicken
Fried Fish

"As a journey of a thousand miles starts with one step decisively made, so the un-
limited vista of a journey into the future starts with the single awareness within the
individual that his actions today will cast shadows on tomorrow''
THE CEiNTICORE BOOKSHOP AND THE MACMILLAN COMPANY
INVITE BELIEVERS, UNBELIEVERS, AND THE UNDECIDED

Fried Oysters
All Dinners Include Fries, Slaw, and Bread

L.I EL 1 ,5 1. vIUai.3T

Qu"-,J-/-) D

CARRY OUT

FREE DELIVERY

Specializing in German and American Food
BANQUET FACILITIES
Dancing Friday, Saturday, and Sunday
Friday and Saturday Starting 9 P.M.
Serving Complete Dinners 11 a.m.-2 a.m.
City Parking Lot in rear of Restaurant
Closed Mondays

OPEN: Mon., Wed., Thurs., Sun.-] 1 a.m. to 2 a.m.
Fri., Sat.-] 1 a.m. to 3 a.m.

314 Detroit St.

665-2266

Il

TO A RECEPTION

FOR

SYBIL

LEEK

THE WORLDS MOST FAMOUS WITCH
TO HONOR THE PUBLICATION OF HER NEW
BOOK OF FORTUNE TELLING
Miss Leek will cast her spell at the Centicore on Saturday, autographing her new
paperback, and holding forth on Tarot, Cartomancy, the I Ching, Scrying, Crystal
Gazing, and other ancient variations of the Prophetic Arts

Located in Scenic Northern Ann Arbor Area (Dixbort j
tt
a a

MIKE and JOE
Invite
You and Your Dale to Casa Nova
for
PIZZA, ITALIAN

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