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November 07, 1969 - Image 9

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Friday, November 7, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine
F

AT INDIANA IN 1970:
Suspended

blacks

Tigers' McLain, Birds' Cuellar
tie in Cy Young balloting

may

return

BLOOMINGTON, Ind.( TPFive
of the 10 black Indiana University
football players who quit the squad
yesterday will be given another
chance-but not this year.
Coach John Pont, who has a
flat rule for dismissal of a player
after two unexcused absences from
practice, talked to the 10 boys
again yesterday at the request of
an unnamed black faculty mem-
ber.
The five seniors are through,
Pont said, but he told the five

underclassmen in the group that nine blacks from its squad last
if they decided to come back for spring.
1970 spring practice or next fall, Iowa's Negro contingent drop-
he would accept them. ped from 16 to 7 in a demand forj
Pont said he considered the changing a list of conditions they
boys' complaints to be personal considered objectionable.
and not racial. All of Indiana's All of Indiana's 14 black players
14 black players boycotted prac- skipped practice Tuesday.
tice Tuesday. Four returned Wednesday, in-
The Hoosier Rose Bowl con- cluding tight end John Andrews,
tenders will gauge the effect of I1an outstanding pass catcher, and
their player losses in a home game Steve Porter, a strong defensive
tomorrow with Iowa, which lost halfback.
The departed include Larry
Highbaugh, Big Ten sprint cham-
pion who scored Indiana's only
_ aE touchdown in a 16-0 victory at

NEW YORK VP)--Dave McNally,1
an also ran in the Americanj
League Cy Young Award voting,
said yesterday he thought his
teammate Mike Cuellar should
have won its outright instead of
tying with Detroit's Denny Mc-
Lain, who was "somewhat sur-
prised" at the result.
McNally was asked his opinion
in Baltimore after Cuellar and
McLain each had received 10 votes:
in the balloting by the 24-man
committee of the Ba eball Writers

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
ERIC SIEGEL
McLain, sharing the laurels, was

voting was for the outstanding
pitcher in the majors.
In past years the only seasons
in which the winner was not with
a championship club were 1967
when Mike McCormick of San
Francisco t o o k the National
League award, 1964 when Dean
Chance of the then Los Angeles
Angels, and 1962 when it was Don
Drysdale of the Los Angeles
Dodgers, who lost a playoff to
San Francisco.

i

AM

BUTTOM
OF THE FIFTH
Jim Forrester
Michigan Ruby .. .
.-..Number One in the nation
ITS BEEN a long time since Michigan has been Number One
nationally in any sport. Last winter the Wolverines came
close in gymnastics but blew their chance for the nationals by
losing to Iowa, a team they had crunched during the season and
would clobber in the conference championship, by losing the
Big Ten preliminary meet that would decide representation in
the Championships in Seattle.
But now the University has a Number One team. It did not
rise from t he money crazed athletic department. Tens of thou-
sands of dollas did not go into building this national power.
There are no athletes on scholarship and no mad recruiting
scrambles to get them. Loot did not pour forth to obtain the
greatest living coaches (though they may have one anyway) and
equipment is sparse and compared to varsity sports it is non-
existent.
The Michigan Rugby Football Club is Number One in the
nation.
ThEY PAY MOST of their own expenses, including travel.
The athletic department is a bit stingy with funds for club sports
but this has failed to deter the ruggers. This year they sent
themselves to Toronto and are shelling out for a round trip bus
ride to Champaign tomorrow. Last Christmas, at their own ex-
pense again, the team toured the British Isles.
The athletic department spent over two million dollars last.
year and couldn't even get to Pasadena.
This season the Rugby Club's "A" team has gone 6-1, losing
only to the green meanies from East Lansing. In that one the
Spartans had the wind but more important Michigan lost two
players in the first five minutes, one knocked cold and the other
with a broken nose. You must, remember, too, that there are no
substitutions in rugby.
But the key victories this year have been against the Uni-
versity of Toronto and the Chicago Lions. The Canadians fell,
15-6, in one of the Club's great victories. Toronto had not lost
in North American competition for three years and had but 20
points scored on them all last season.
The Lions were the representative team in the Mid-West,
playing foreign teams touring the area. Earlier in the year they
toured England winning foir games, impressive for a touring
team.
The game against Chicago was a tough and bloody affair
with the Wolverines pulling out an 8-3 triumph. Two Michigan
men had their probosci clobbered but remained in the game.
Chicago was not so lucky as one of their men went down with a
broken collarbone, forcing the Lions to finish the game short-
handed.
The top spot claim, though, might be disputed by some
California newspapers as they put UCLA on top. Strangely
enough 17 other California clubs appear in this top 20. In the
18th slot is Wisconsin, dumped earlier in the season by Michi-
gan's "B" team. So much for that "POLL
CL IM PRESIDIENTl HARVEY SCILLER, though, feels
Number One cannot be decided as few of the top clubs play each
other. He looks at, besides Michigan, UCLO, the Old Blue Club
of New York and the Kansas City Blues, as the nation's top
teams.
"We're shooting at a national championship tournament,''
said Schiller, but also admitted that playing top flight competi-
tion throughout the season would be a 'better barometer.
"But the travel expenses are too much," continued Schiller.
"Our players already buy their own uniforms and pay dues be-
sides. We sell buttons, bumper stickers and T-shirts to pay bills
but none of this is enough to make long trips."
The real success of the club, though, is not its record but its
spirit. The ruggers play a game, not a business. Missing a prac-
tice is not the end of the world and training regulations are a
man's own business.
However, most of the ruggers train in the same manner.
They drink beer ater practices and after the games. The hone
team throws a party for the visitors and make a point of show-
ing them a good time.
And, win or lose, everybody shakes hands after the game.
Come to think of it, maybe the athletic department ought
to send the Rugby Club to California instead of the football
team. After all, they are Number One.
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Michigan State last veek, and the

t!.

starting linebacker Ice Adams.
Pont clarified the foggy situa-
tion a little yesterday. He saidl
he met with the black contingent#
Wednesday at the home of one of
the mar'ied players for about 20!
minutes.
"They made no threats. which
is a credit to all of them," Pont
said. "It was about lack of play-
ing time."
After Indiana suffered success-
hive defeats by California and
Colorado, Pont announced every-
body's starting position was up for
grabs and starting lineups would
be named on the basis of each
week's practice performances.
Negro players who lost starting
positions included linebacker Don
Silas and defensive end Clarence
Price. Highbaugh, however, had
worked himself into a starting de-
fensive halfback position at the
expense of Benny Norman, an-
other Negro.

Association of America, two from rstmerican eaguer to re- JACK LANG, secretary - treas-
each league city. Minnesota's Jim peat. Sandy Koufax of the Los urer of the association, said there
ech leeity.t Miesota'sadJi Angeles Dodgers won it three are no tie-breaking provisions in
Perry received three votes and times. McLain had a 24-9 won- the rules. Consequently each will
McNally got one. lost record for the Tigers and a receive an award. The voting was
1 2.80 earned run average. His nine done by secret ballot between the
gotten the award," said McNally shutouts led the league end of the season and the start of
"He was great. What else could Perry was Minnesota's big win- ! the playoffs with only regular
he have done? He was super after ner with a 20-6 record and a 2.78 season performance to be con-
the All-Star game (13-2) and he earned run average. McNally was sidered.
pitched well before that but we 20-7 with the Orioles and had a The closest thing to a tie pre-
didn't get him any runs. 3.21 earned run mark. viously was in the 1968 vote for
This was only the third year in National League rookie in which
"I'm not taking anything away which separate Cy Young Awards Johnny Bench of Cincinnati got
from McLain but Mike's ERA were made for each major league. ! 1012 and Jerry Koosman of the
(earned run average) was much Originally from 1956 to 1966, the Mets 9%.
better (2.38 to 2.80) and he was

-Associated Press
Nof this way,
Atlanta's Jimmy Davis shields his face from the ball in the Hawks'
NBA game against the Chicago Bulls last night in Chicago. The
IHawks won, 124-122, on two free throws by Lou Hudson.

as consistent as Denny. The voters
have always gone with the pen-
nant winner in the past. Mike
didn't get it for the same reason
Weaver wasn't named nranager of
the year; the Baltimore press
didn't push him enough."
Cuellar, who is pitching winter
ball in Puerto Rico, was not
available for comment immedi-
ately.
McLain was reached in Califor-
nia between engagements on a
nationwide organ-playing tour.
"I FEEL VERY lucky and some-
what surprised," said the Tigers'
ace, who won 31 games in 1968
and followed with a 24-9 season
in 1969.
"Last year wasn't too much of
a problem. This year, I thought
sure they'd go with the pennant
winner, I'm certainly very much
honored."
McLain is a member of a musi-
cal group of four who play in
music stores or wherever booked.
They were due to be in both Sac- I
ramento and San Diego.
Cuellar, a left-hander with a
darting crewball pitch, came to
the Orioles from Houston in a
trade last winter. He helped pitch
Baltimore to the pennant with a
23-11 record and a 2.38 earned
run average.

This Weekend in Sports
T O D A Y
FOOTBALL-Daily Libels at student counseling office. Ferry
Field, 4:30
SATURDAY
FOOTBALL--Michigan vs. Illinois at Champaign
RUGBY-Michigan vs. Illinois at Champaign

WIN STREAK ENDED):
Wings clippe Jy Blues, 5-2

fy The Associated Press
DETROIT - The St. Louis
Blues continued to thrive on
their newfound power play last
night, scoring three times while
Detroit was shorthanded, to whip
the Red Wings 5-2 in a National
Hockey League game last night.
Rid Berenson scored his sixth
and seventh goals of the season,
one on a powver play, to lead the
Blues as they snapped Detroit's
four-game winning streak before
12.557 fans at Olympia Stadium.
St. Louis was ranked 11th in
the 12-team NHL in power play
goals last season, but the Blues

added Phil Goyette from N e w
York during the summer and the
slick 36-year-old center is paying
off.
GoyAte scored the game's first
goal on a power play, and assisted
on Berenson's first goal.
Goyette scored the game's first
goal on a power play, and as-
sisted on Berenson's first goal to
break a 1-1 tie and put the BluesE
ahead for keeps,
St. Louis now has scored 16
power play goals in j u s t 12,
games and leads the league.
The Blues also lead the Wes-

tern Division in the standings.
Goyette's goal and Beranson's
pair, 1 minute, 9 seconds apart,
gave St. Louis a 3-1 lead half-
Nvay into the first period.
Lar'y Keenans backhander on
another power play midway in the
second period made it 4-1 before
Garry Unger scored Detroit's se-
cond power play g o a 1 of the
night.
However, St. Louis' Ab M c -
Donald netted his seventh goal
of tha season less than a min-
ute later.
Philadelphians flogged
PHILADELPHIA-Mickey Red-
mond rolled in a 12-foot, third
period goal as he was knocked tc
the ice to lead the Montmreal Cana-
diens to a 4-1 victory over the
Philadelphia Flyers last night ir
a National Hockey League game.
Montreal's win combined with
Detroit's loss to St. Louis put the
Canadiens in a three-way tie in
the NHL's East Division with the
Red Wings and Boston.

Professional Standings

t
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N B A
NV L Pct. GBI
New York 1 1 >.923-
Philadelphia 5 4 .556 5
Milwaukee 6 5 .545 5
13,+aItimore 6 5 .545 5
Roston 3 5 .375 61
Detro0it :1 5 .375 6E
-('0ncinhlati 4 8 .333 71
WIestecrn11Division
Atlanta 8 3 .727 -
Los Angeles 5 3 .6253 i
SanI Fraincisco 5' 3 .625 V
Chic'ago , 5.50.$0 21
Phoenixa3 6 .333 4
ttle7222 5
San Diego 1 6 .111 6
1.ast Night's Results
Atlanta 124, Chicago 122
San Francisco 130, Cincinnati 109
Today's Games
Seattle-at Baltimore
San Francisco at Boston
Philadelphia at Detroit
Phoenix at Los Angeles
New 'Rork at San Diego
* * * *
N H L
East Division
11 L '1'Pt. GSG(
Boston 6 6 2 3 15 37
{ Detroit 7 3 1 15 342
Montreal 5 2 5 i5 44
New York 6 it 2 14 33
'l'oronto -4 5 2 It0323
C (hicago 3 6 1 7 20

.

W'est lvision
St. 1,oufi 5 3 4
Oakland 1 5 1
Philadelphia ' 3 5
Minnesota 4 6 1
Pittsb mr-,i '_' 6 3
Los Angeles 3 6
Last Night's Itesu
St. Laois 5, Detroit 2
Mont real 4, Philadelphia I
Today's Games
New York at Oakland

i
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