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November 05, 1969 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-05

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Page Eight'

THE MICHIGAN! DRILY

Wednesday, November 5, 1969

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FLEMJNG TESTIFIES:

No decision in LSA sit-in

trial;

Angry taxpayers kill
income tax proposal

move to disqualify Elden denied

By LINDSAY CHANEY
No decision was reached
11:30 p.m. yesterday in the
of eight University students1
tried on charges of contentio
their participation in the
25-26 sit-in in the LSA Bldg
Earlier yesterday, Univ
President Robben Fleming tes
that on the evening of the
he told the students they w
violation of a University
which prohibits unauthorized
sons from occupying a Univ
building after closing hour.
Fleming said he told the
dents that he would seek a
injunction if they refused to
the LSA Bldg.
University B u i l d i n g Se

Manager Theron Klager testified ;Elden. Presently there is dispute
as of that he never asked any students as to what the term means.
s to leave the building or stand W
trials asd ote aioscol la When the trial convened, the
tinalaside so the janitor~s could clean1 defense team filed a motion to
being the area. He also stated that he I disqualify Judge Elden from pre-
Sept. could not identify any of the eight siding at the trial, based on an
. ;t.defendants as having been in the affidavit which claimed that Eld-
. building on the evening of Sept. 25. en had a police radio with him on
ersity The head janitor of the LSA Sept 25.
tified Bldg., Arthur Rentz, testified
sit-in that h saw six of the eight de- The defense also claimed that
ere in fendants in the building on the Elden showed further undue in1-

rule
I per-,
ersity
stu-
court,
leave
rvices'

night of the sit-in. He said no stu-
dents threatened him or were vio-
lent, and he had denied students
the use of custodial equipment
when they asked to use it to help
clean the building.
A motion, introduced by defense
lawyers to define contention early
in the trail was disregarded by

erest i the L &A sit-in ay stay-
ing at the police station.
When there is a motion to dis-
qualify a judge, another court
administrator must hear the
motion. Elden appointed Judge
Peter Thomassen to hear the dis-
missal motion.
The defense then filed a mo-

tion to disqualify Thomassen from
hearing the dismissal motion on
the grounds that Thomassen is a
professional associate of Elden
and should therefore not hear thet
motion.
Elden then appointed himself
the court administrator who would
hear the dismissal motion against
Thomassen.
Elden denied the dismissal.
charge against Thomassen.
The group moved to Thomas-'
sen's courtroom where the dis-
missal charge against Elden wasE
to be heard.
Thomassen denied the motion to
dismiss Elden. He based his deci-
sion on the fact that Elden was
due at a required meeting of all
Michigan District Court judges in
Detroit the next morning, and was
therefore reasonably interested in
knowing whether he would be
needed for arraignment proceed-,
ings that night.
After the motion to dismiss
Elden was denied, the group con-:
sisting of the lawyers, defendants,
spectators and Elden moved back
to Elden's courtroom where the'
sit-in trial began.
The eight students are: Chris-
tine Carron, LSA '73; Susan Ne-
vile, Ed '71; Alethea Bothwell,'
LSA '70; Daniel Weinstein: James
Berger, LSA '69; Susan Ditkoff,
Ed '71; Kathleen Kolman, RC '71;
and Ronald Greiner, LSA '70.

(Continued from Page1 }
precinct of the First Ward -
failed to pass the tax by only
one vote.
The students and the blacks
-who usually can be counted on
to vote heavily Democratic-did
not turn out for this election.
"Students didn't come out as
strongly for the income tax as
they did for Harris," Cress says.
The student vote is credited with
election of Harris last April.
It is believed that the stu-
dent vote was not mobilized on
a large scale because some
Democrats were afraid students
would vote against the income
tax. And, in fact, the tax would
have hiked the taxes paid by
some married students in low
cost University housing who pay
no property tax, but who would
have paid a greater income tax.
"The black vote was not as
great as it was in April," said
Albert Wheeler, former state
president of the NAACP. "The
vote would have been greater if
we (the NAACP) had been able
to put out an election bulletin
as we usually do," he continued.
Wheeler also feels that a sig-
nificant number of the black
community would have had to
pay little or no additional tax,
and would have been favorable
to the proposal. But, he said,
"the Democrats made a very low
pitched approach and the voter
education wasn't as good as it
has been in the past."
Some think the final major

factor in the defeat of the in-
come tax was Harris' failure to
establish clear priorities for the
spending of the additional rev-
enue thatthe proposal would
have raised.
"The proposal lost because the
mayor and the council didn't'
establish priorities on how they
were going to spend the money,"
said Jack Garris, chairman of
the concerned Citizens of Ann'
Arbor.
"We believe the citizens of
Ann Arbor are asking the Demo-
cratic administration to review
and carefully shape their spend-
ing priorities," agreeds Brian
Connelly, chairman of the Ci-ty
Republican Party.
The fiscal future of Ann Ar-
bor is very uncertain. Harris
said yesterday that he does not
know what method of securing
additional revenues he will pur-
sue.
He is considering holding an-
other election on the income
tax, seeking a special millage
inc ease, or cutting back on city
s m'vices.
The chie opponents of the in-
come tax. the Chamber of Coin-
merce. the Board of Realtors
and the Republican P rty all
have said they are in favoR' of
the concept of an income tax,
but they do not feel it is cur-
rent'y needed.
A City income tax seems
Qefinite'y in the future for Ain
Abor; its passage is only a mat-
te' of time.

GRADUATE SCHOOL IN ENGLISH?
Are you undecided or confused about which is
the best Graduate School for you? I f so, come to
the
SYMPOSIUM ON GRADUATE STUDIES
IN ENGLISH
This W EDNESDAY, NOV. 5th, 7:30 P.M.-1 025 Ange1l
Six Profe scrs to give advice and answer questions
OPENS TONIGHT!
Shakespeare's
8:00 P.M.-Trueblood Theatre, Frieze Building
Box Office open until 8:00 P.M. 764-5587
SUBS(RIBE TO T HE MXHf6AN DAILY

Gribbs, Lindsay, Stokes win

(Continued from Page 1 }
then that Lindsay did not stand
a chance against Procaccino, who
wvon the Democratic nomination
by defeating four other candi-
dates, including former Mayor
Robert F. Wagner.
Since 70 per cent of New York's
voters are registered Democrats
most knowledgeable observers pro-
jected Procaccino as an easy
winner.
After Lindsay lost the Republi-
can primary, his campaign work-
ers conducted voter attitude sur-
veys which indicated he had no
chance of winning in the conser-
vative Italian and Greek com-
m unities, but was certain to carry
the black commznunities, which
represented 30 per cent of the
vote.
A Lindsay victory, the surveys'
indicated, would require him to
win 50 per cent of the Jewish
vote, something which he did four
years ago but now seemed un-
likely.
During his administration, Jew-
ish communities have repeatedly
accused Lindsay of catering only
to the poor and black neighbor-
hoods, at the expense of the mid-
dle class citizens,
The middle class has also ac-
cused Lindsay of being responsible
for a breakdown in law and order
and an accompanying increase in
crime.
In his campaign, Lindsay sought
to curb this image by appearing
frequently in middle and upper
middle class neighborhoods and
taking action to increase t h e
number of police, particularly at
peak crime hours.
In the end, the Mayor won tha

endorsements of many liberal Re-
publicans, led by Sen. Jacob K.
Javits of New York, and liberal
Democrats from Pearl Bailey to
Arthur Goldberg, former associate
justice of the Supreme Court, and
a popular figure in New York
City's Jewish neighborhoods.

issue out of the city's growing,
crime rate and failure of Stokes to
increase manpower in the police
department until he added 209
men within the last month. The'
police themselves have been crit-
ical of Stokes' police policies.
Stokes has defended his ad-

Politicians for and against him ministration and pointed gener-
have agreed on the following rea- ally to programs he has started.

sons for Lindasy's revival:
-the splitting of the anti-Lind-
say vote by Procaccino and
Marchi;
-months of relative calm in
the city after sieges of racial ten-
sion and labor troubles;
- Procaccino's inability to pro-
ject himself as a moderate Demo-
crat with the stature of a Mayor.
Election officials in Cleveland,
estimated that 240,000 of the'
city's 316,000 registered voters
turned out yesterday.
In 1967, Stokes was elected by;
a margin of only 1,679 votes out
of 257,000.
The race between Stokes and
Perk was rated a tossup by poli-
tical observers and both Cleveland
newspapers.
Perk made a major campaign
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He also complained that Perk re-
fused to debate him, questioned
Perk's work as county auditor
and at one point accused Repub-
licans of stealing from his cam-
paign files.
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