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November 05, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-05

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MATINEE 1:30-Adults $1.50
TONIGHT 8 P.M.--Adults $1.75
ACADEMY AWARD WINNER!
BEST ACTRESS! BARBRA STREISAND
o COlUMBIA PICTURES and RASTAR PRODUCTIONS
-e present THE WILLIAM WYLER-RAY STARK
" prpduction
S I OI
STECHNICOLOR0 * PANAVIS0N
OPENS TONIGHT !
Shakespeare's
8:00 P.M.-Trueblood Theatre, Frieze Building I
Box Office open until 8:00 P.M. 764-5587
OPENINGS FOR
CHILD CARE WORKERS
-HAWTHORN CENTER
Work-Experience Opportunity with Emotionally
Disturbed Children
Hawthorn Center offers mature students a unique
opportunity to work directly with disturbed children
in a creative, well-supervised, in-patient treatment
setting - a particularly rewarding experience for
potential professional workers in Education Psy-
chology, Social Work, Medicine and related Behav-
ioral Sciences.
Hours: 32 or 40 per week. Must be able to work
days and weekends.
Potential openings on evenings and midnight shift.
Age Requirement: Minimum-20 years.
Education: Minimum-Two credit years completed
and good academic standing in third year.
Salary: With Bachelor's degree-$7078 per year
Without Bachelor's degree--$6410 per year

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NEWS PIIONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Wednesday, November 5, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

, [e AssocuatedPress and Colle Press Ser ice

Senators

ask

war probe;

SENATE AND HOUSE CONFEREES agreed on a $:0.7
billion military procurement authorization bill.
Proposed amendments to curb aid to Laos and Thailand, chem-
ical and biological warfare contracts and independent research were
either rejected orswatered down by representatives of the two
Sbranches of Congress.
The conferees approved a $28 million additional authorization
for the "Freedom Fighter," a new simplified fighter aircraft for use
in Southeast Asia as well as partial allotments for a variety of smaller
weapons systems.
The compromnise measure, which is scheduled for final action in
both houses this week, authorizes funds for almost every project the
Pentagon requested.
PRESIDENT NIXON elevated Bryce liarlow and Daniel
Moynihan to the rank of presidential counselors in a reorganiza-
tion of White House staff.
Harlow will advise Nixon on a broad range of national affairs
in addition to his present job of guiding the President on con-
gressional relations.
Moynihan, now head of th2 White House Urban Affairs Coun-
cil staff, will counsel Nixon on domestic policy while continuing to
give advice on urban problems. A new executive secretary for the
Urban Affairs Council will be named soon.
Included in the staff revamping was the appointment of John
Ehrlictman to the newly created post of Assistant to the President

N .

Vietnam blasts

Nixon

U.S. allies
back Nixon
peace plan
LONDON Gi--Two of Amer-
ica's European allies yesterday
backed President Nixon's plan
for peace in Vietnam but the
North Vietnamese and Viet
Cong delegations at the Paris
peace talks charged Nixon
with prolonging a "war of
agression."
Most European newspapers that
commented on Monday's presi-
dential address expressed disap-

or the Domestic Affairs, equivalent in rank to Henry Kissinger's paintment Some predicted the
position as Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs. speech would add force to anti-
* w ar demonstrations in the United
THE UNITED STATES urged defeat of a plan to give Nation- States later t hi smonth. Soviet
alist China's U.N. seat to Red China. news media dismissed the speech

Call or Write:

Director of Nursing
Hawthorn Center
Northville, Michigan
Telephone: Area Code 313-
Fl 9-3000 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Rep. J. Irving Whalley (D-Pa), a member of the U.S. dele-
gation, said the United States opposes a resolution offered by Al-
bania to unseat the nationalist Chinese because it would expel a gov-
ernment which has been a member of the United Nations since its
founding.
Speaking to the U.N. General Assembly, Whalley questioned
whether Communist China's entry into the international body would'
serve the cause of peace. He attacked Peking's "attitude of isolationj
and disrespect for the United Nations."
TIHE PENTAGON abolished the job of an Air Force efficiency
expert who disclosed costs on overruns to a congressional com-,
mittee.
The Air Force announced that A. Ernest Fitzgerald's post as'
deputy for management systems in the office of the assistant secre-;
tary of the air force was being eliminated along with 850 other;
positions.]
Fitzgerald testified on cost overruns on the C5A super transport
plane to the Senate-House Economic Committee when the committee
was investigating defense procurement practices last year.1
The Air Force denied there was any connection between the job
elimination and Fitzgerald's testimony.
NATIONAL GENERAL CORPO RAT ON Te Michigan Daily, edited and man-
FOX EASTERN THEATRE5 Sc aged by students at the University of
I Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor. Mich-
375 No. MAPLE PD.-'769.1300 1 an, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
7 ,T nh nn y R11k t:, i.. .,. .., . m ...

Sex, Students, and the New Morality
Brief reviews of some important books will be followed by informal
discussions of the views and issues presented. While the books
announced will be the basis for the presentations, other current .
literature will also be considered. Open to all interested persons.
TIRSDAY EVENINGS AT 1 P.M.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Huron, Pine Room (Basement)
TOMORROW
NOVEMBER 6-"Living with Sex -The Students'
Dilemma" (Hettinger)
Reviewer-LEONARD SCOTT, Counseling Director
Office of Religious Affairs
COMING
NOVEMBER 13-"Abortion" (Lader
Reviewer-ROBERT HAUERT, Program Director
Office of Religious AffairsE
NOVEMBER 20-"Toward a Christian Understand-
ing of the Homosexual" (Jones)-"Careful study
can erase centuries of ignorance, prejudice, con-
demnation, and persecution which have charac-
terized the Christian community's past handling
of homosexuality" (Pastoral Psychology)
Reviewer--LLOYD W. PUTNAM, Acting Director
Office of Religious Affairs
Sponsored by the Office of Religious Affairs
2282 SAB-764-7442

as an attempt to lull the Ameri-
can public
Support for the President came
from Britain and West Germany.
In London, an official state-
ment declared: "The Byitish gov-
ernment welcomes the United
States' determination to perserve
in the search for an honorable
solution to the Vietnam conflict.
"President Nixon's plan for a'
complete withdrawal of all U.S.a
ground combat forces from Viet-
nam is a major contribution We
hope that there will be a con-
structive response from the other
side and that progress will now be:
made in Paris toward a negotiated
settlement."
West German Chancellor Willyr
Brandt supported Nixon's aim of
seaking a solution through grad-
ual troop withdrawals and said he
hoped the speech would find a
positive answer in Hanoi.
The German government, he
said, "welcomes every initiative
to end the suffering of the Viet-r
namese people through negotia-
tions."
The North Vietnamese delega-'
tion in Paris denounced the speech
as "a defiance not only of the
Vietnamese people but of the
'American people and all the peace-
loving people in the world."
A statement from the delegationI
demanded that the United States,
withdraw its troop rapidly, totally
and unconditionally and contend-:
ed Nixon's address revealed the
"warlike and perfidious nature
of his administration."
A separ'ate statement from the.
Viet Coag delegation said the'
speech contained nothing new and
sought to prolong and intensify!
"the American war of aggression."
President Nguyen Van Thieu of
South Vietnam warmly supported
Nixon's speech as "one of the
most important and greatest ad-
dresses of a president of the Unit-G
ed States."

Fuibright hit
Nixon speech
WASHINGTON t4 - Sens.
J. W. Fulbright (D-Ark.) and
M i k e Mansfield (D-Mont.)
called yesterday for early
S 4 hearings by the Foreign Rela-
tions Committee on Presi-
dent Nixon's policies as Dem-
* ocratic doves and some Re-
publicans criticized his unwil-
lingness to announce n e w
troop withdrawals.
"He now has fully and truth-
fully taken on himself the John-
son war, and I think it is a fun-
damental error," Fulbright t o 1 d
, reporters.
The Foreign Relations Commit-
tee,rwhich Fulbright heads, had
"t -:. 54..deferred plans for broad Vietnam
hearings last week pending Nix-
on's speech. Fulbright said the
committee meets today "to dis-
cuss whether it would be wise to
have the hearings. My own view
-Associated Press is that it would be. My guess is
F b gh cr ci N ix n that they will approve."
F'ulbrry it criticreSes xon speechMansfield, saying he had hoped
- -- --- -----_------- -----Nixon would offer the nation
T , y ~r 'more definite word on getting out
D AEFY C U T: of Vietnam in Monday night's
speech, told reporters hearings
might change present policies.
rotste rs irtarc It Oil, denmnot at all sure the Presi-
!r 7 l. U TC O ,dent's mind is so closed he would-
n't be open to constructive sug-
gestions," the Senate Democratic
leader said.
AlIT research labs . While most Republicans in the
;Houseand Senate hailed the
CAMBRIDGE, Mass () -- De- ministration building and, on a speech, Sen. M a r k O. Hatfield
fying a court order, anti-war voice vote, decided not to seize (R-Ore.), a longtime war critic,
demonstrators invaded the admin- Johnson's office. They then de- said "I had hoped that .t h e r e
istration building at Massachu- cided instead to march on the In- would have been a greater imple-
setts Institute of Technology yes- strumentation Laboratory. mentation of his plans for troop
terday, then marched to other fa- No attempt was made to invade withdrawal so that he could have
cilities on campus. the Center for International Stu- broadened his base of support."
They demanded an end to both dies. It was ordered closed earlier But the top Democrat in the
the war in Vietnam and MIT's by the administration. House, Speaker John W. McCor-
involvement in defense-related re- Because of the risk of violencemack of Massachusetts, termed
search. and the nature of the threats that Nixon's speech "logically stated
There were no arrests. Campus have been made against some of and in our best interests."
police were the only law enforce- the people whose offices are in Leaders of three anti-war groups
ment officers in evidence, the building, we felt the wisest called t h e speech a disappoint-
About 1,000 of the demonstra- course was to close it," said Prof. ment and said it will increase the
tors went to the Instrumentation Paul E. Gray, associate provost. size of protests planned for mid-
Laboratories, which are just out- . November, "We are convinced
side t h e MIT campus property, In at least two occasions during that the President has misjudged
but they made no attempt to en- the afternoon the demonstrators the mood of this country, just as
ter the buildings. were read copies of the court order, he has misjudged the realities of
Chanting and waving a 10-foot which the administration obtained Vietnam," said Sam Brown, one of
NLF banner, the demonstrators Monday an d which barred the the coordinators of the Vietnam
demanded through a loudspeaker protesters from disrupting insti- Moratorium Committee.
that work be halted on the Posei- tute routine.__

MON-FRI.-7:10-9:20
SAT.-SUN.-5;10-7:15-9:30
B CH7CASSIDY AND
THE SUNDANCE KID

1.vichigan '48104i. Puulishedda ly ues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by,
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

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PANAYiStON COLOR BY DELUXE
M Sgessted Fa MAtUM Audiences ""

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DIAL 8-6414
ENDING TONIGHT
Shows at 1-3-5-7-9
"Sex is like the
Empire State Bldg...."
Lillth Milimore.
the President's Mother
{First Mother)

don missile guidance system.
After a short time, the demon-
strators returned to the plaza out-
side the Student Center to listen
to more speeches.
Most of MIT's 6,000 students ig-
nored the demonstrations. Classes
were conducted normally.
The protest, led by a g r o u p
which calls itself the November
Action Coalition, began about
noon with a mass rally at MIT's
Kresge Plaza.+
Then, shouting "Ho, Ho, Ho
Chi Minh, the NLF is bound- to+
win," the protesters marched
through a light rain to the ad-
ministration building.+
They surged through the build-
ing's first-floor corridors for about
10 minutes, t h e n the majority
spilled back outside a n d treked
four blocks to MIT's Center for+
International Studies. Others jam-
med a corridor on the second floort

Yale susp ends 50 students
following off£ice occupation

NEW HAVEN, Conn. (P) --- A
five-hour occupation of a Yale
University personnel office ended
Monday night with the suspension
of about 50 Yale students and the
release of three personnel offi-
cials who had been held captive.
Some 100 students had marched
into the office about 2 p.m. after
a meeting called by Students for
a Democratic Society.
They demanded the rehiring of
Mrs. Colia Williams, a Negro pro-
bationary employe in a college
dining hall who was recently fired.
University officials scheduled a
meeting with the students for 3

tions. Campus police barred others
from entering the building while
the students held the office until
nearly 7 p.m., refusing to let three
officials leave.
Those barred from leaving were
Jack Embersits, Yale's business
manager; Albert Dobie, an official
in charge of the dining halls, and
William Carney, an assistant em-
ployment supervisor.
The university's dining hall per-
sonnel supervisor, Henry Kremski,
was allowed to leave at about 5
p.m.
H .lf an hour later, Yale Provost

HELD OVER
by
popular demand

I

* THURSDAY *
"BUL LITT" and "BONNIE and CLYDE"

outside the office of MIT Presi- pm. yesterday to go over Mrs. Charles H. Taylor Jr. told the stu-
dent Howard W. Johnson. Williams' case. SDS meanwhile denys they would be suspended if
Later, the demonstrators ral- planned other meetings of its own they stayed in the building an-
lied again in a rotunda in the ad- to consider renewed demonstra- I other 20 minutes.

I

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ir. __- ._

; _ = r

3rd BIG WEEK

!

University of Mi

i
Ichigan School of Music '
Presents
969-1970!I
IVAL OF

The funniest movie in
years. Fantastic! The
Marx Brothers at their
craziest, updated by
a hybrid of Lenny Bruce
and Eldridge Cleaver."
-S.F. Magazine
"A 700 of weird charac-

1 I
FEST

III CONTEMPORARY MUSIC
(last concert in the series)
Wednesday, November 5-8:00 P.M.
RACKHAM LECTURE HALL
SEYMOUR SHIFRIN, guest composer
WEBERN-"Drei Gesange, Opus 23"
Michele Derr, soprano
Ellwood Derr, piano

=PUTN EY

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