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November 04, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

University of Michigan School of Music
Presents
1969-1970
FESTIVAL OF
CONTEMPORARY MUS IC
(last concert in the series)

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Tuesday, November 4, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

LSD study finds

no chromosome damage

Wednesday, November 5-8:00 P.M.
RACKHAM LECTURE HALL
SEYMOUR SHIFRIN, guest composer
WEBERN-"Drei Gesonge, Opus 23"
Michele Derr, soprano
Ellwood Derr, piano
SH IFRIN--"String Quartet No. 5"
Stanley Ouartet
BERRY-"Des Visages de France"
Michigan Chamber Ensemble
Lynda WestonrRosemary Russell, soloists
Theo Alcantara, conductor
SHIFRIN-"Chamber Symphony"
Michigan Chamber Ensemble
Theo Alcantara, conductor
NO ADMISSION CHARGE
Space provided by Pi Kappa Lambda

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CHICAGO ("P)-In contrast to pre-
vious studies, three researchers reported
yesterday that the use of LSD does not
cause significant changes in the users"
chromosomes.
The research had been spurred by
widespread concern among doctors
about possible effects of the drug on
chromosomes, the carriers of genes. If
such damage had occurred, the chil-
dren of LSD users might have been
born with physical or mental defects.
LSD is the popular abbreviation for
lysergic acid diethylamide, an hal-

lucinogenic drug which has had wide-
spread illicit use.
The researchers said the results of
their studies "would seem to sustain
the conclusion that at this time there
is no definitive evidence that LSD
damages chromosomes of human white
blood cells." "However," they added,
"further research in this complex field
is obviously needed."
The research was conducted by three
Maryland doctors with a grant from
the National Institute of Mental
Health. The findings appeared in the
Nov. 3 issue of the Journal of the
American Medical Association.

Criticizing the earlier investigations
of the matter, the researchers said one
major shortcoming uniformly char-
acterizing previous studies was the ab-
sence of adequate control measures.
"Most important, the chromosomal
aberration rate prior to the alleged
taking of LSD was not assessed," they
said. "With the goal of providing a
more definite answer, we undertook a
larger prospective study," they added.
For the study the investigators used
32 patients already scheduled to re-
ceive LSD as part of the psychiatric

treatment. at the Spring Grove State
Hospital, Baltimore.
The patients were hospitalized for
alcoholism or neurotic problems and
had never taken LSD previously. All
volunteered to be subjects in a study
of the potential of LSD in psychiatric
treatment.
The subjects ranged in age from 20
to 56 years oldl, and included five fe-
males and 27 males. Both high-dose
and low-dose groups were studied.
Their statistical analysis, the re-
searchers said, "revealed no significant
difference in the chromosomal aber-

ration rates before and after taking
LSD for either the high or low dose
groups whether analyzed separately or
as one group."
"Our findings are in contrast to the
four studies which have reported more
chromosomal aberrations in LSD
takers than in normal controls," the
researchers wrote.
They said other research failed to
take into account chromosomal ab-
erration before the use of LSD, infec-
tions in the users, the use of other
drugs with LSD, impurities present in
homemade LSD, and other factors.

PRESENTS
Under the High Patronage of
Her Majesty, Elizabeth II,
THE
ROYALj
CHORAL SOCIETY
accorn panied by the j
ROYAL CHORAL SOCIETY
PLAYERS
conducted by
WYN MORRIS
TONIGHT AT 8:30
IN HILL AUDITORIUM
PROGRAM:
HANDEL................... ........ Coronation Anthem
HODDINOCT ..... .. Ervri (composed for the Investiture of
Charles, Prince of Wales 1969) First Time in America
BEETHOVEN ...............................Mass in C Major
Tickets: $7.00, $6.50, $6.00, $5.00, $3.50, $2.50
THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY '
Burton Tower, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
Hours: 9:00 to 4:30 Mon. thru Fri.; Sat. 9:00 to 12:00
(Also l % hours before performance at Rgckham Auditorium)

the 1t
news today
by TFhe Associated Press and College Press Service
ARAB GUERRILLAS reached a settlement of their differ-
ences with the Lebanese government.
In a communique issued after seven hours of negotiations in
Cairo, Yasir Arafat, leader of the Palestine Liberation Organization,
and Gen. Emile Bustani, Lebanon's army commander, cited their
brotherly ties and common destiny as the main reasons for the agree-
ment designed to guarantee both Palestinian interests and the sov-
ereignty of Lebanon.
BLACK PROTESTERS snarled traffic in downtown Memphis,
Tenn. while students boycotted the schools.
For the fourth straight week, about 65,000 students and 650
teachers stayed away from classes to enforce demands that the
Memphis school board include more black representation in school
affairs and to aid a predominately black strike against a local hos-
pital.
In addition, about 4000 marchers staged two traffic-snarling
marches through the downtown streets of Memphis, and still man-
aged to avoid a major confrontation with the police. The street
mai'chers have been continuing on an almost daily basis for the dura-
tion of the month-long protest period.
Leaders of the newly-formed Negro-coalition said a fifth Mon-
day school boycott would be staged next week, when the Rev. Ralph
David Absrnathy, head of the Southern Christian Leadership Con-
ference will lead the march.
R*
PRESIDENT NIXON'S first budget is expected to exceed
$200 billion.
Despite a general order to government agencies calling for
stringent cost-cutting, high administration officials speculated that
outlays in fiscal 1971 would be about 10 billion higher than the target
originally set by the administration.
Defense costs received the chief blame for the increase in ex-
penditures, and officials conceded that unless there were major
changes in the war effort, the $5.9 billion surplus which Nixon had
promised will not be met.

Nixon strength

to

OFF-YEAR ELECTIONS

face

test

From Wire Service Reports
Both the political strength of the White House and big-
city political trends will be tested today in several important
off-year elections. Gubernatorial elections are slated for New
Jersey and Virginia, while New York, Cleveland, and Detroit
will select mayors.
The only congressional race involves the seat in New
Jersey's 8th district, where the incumbent resigned to become
a state court judge.
Both gubernatorial races are considered significant be-
cause President Nixon has traveled to each of the states to
campaign personally for the two Republicans.
In Virginia, Nixon backed Linwood Holton, a Republican
with the backing of civil rights and labor leaders, in his bid
to end the Democrats' 83-year
hold on the statehouse. Wil-
liam Battle, his Democratic 00 1 O er
opponent, was rated a slight C o ipose
favorite, however.

Nixons choice in New Jersey
was William T. Cahill, a six-term
congressman who is r u nn i n g
t : against former Democratic Gov.
Robert B. Meyner. The contest has
been rated a toss-up.
g ' 4<Most significant among the
.<b'mayoral races is the election in
New York, where incumbent May-
or John V. Lindsay is now con-
sidered a 5-2 favorite to defeat
'' his Democratic and Republican!
opponents.
Lindsay began as the underdog
M°:after he lost the GOP primary to!
State Senator John Marchi from
Associated Press Staten Island. Lindsay mounted a
comeback featuring the Vietnam
New York mayoral favorite John Lindsay War as an issue while champion-3
. ing the city's minorities.

Radical Film Series
presents
with HENRY FONDA and WALTER MATTHAU
" "The picture is'so stylishly produced, so well acted
and so loaded with suspense that millions of movie-
goers will probably believe it all could happen this
way."-Life
* "By a scrupulous plausibility of circumstance and
technical detail and a cunning manipulation of sus-
pense, one is inched to the edge of one's seat and
left there in a state of bizarre emotional dishevel-
ment at once suffering and yet enjoying the threat
of one's own imminent extinction."-New Yorker
WED., NOV. .h-1-9:30-12 P.M.
ADMISSION 75c
CANTERBURY HOUSE-330 Maynard

FORMER ATrTY. GEN. RAMSEY CLARK urged Congress to COUIRT IN JUNCTION:
repeal punitive draft laws. J_

Testifying before a Senate Judiciary subcommittee, Clark said
that the punitive use of draft rules to silence protest was an arbi-j
trary use of power that was clearly unconstitutional.
The delinquency rules should be entirely put out of business,t
Clark warned in calling for a complete overhaul of the Military Se-
lective Service Act. Such laws, he said, make the law not respectable.
,=,

MIT bans expected
anti-war disruptions

3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
NOW SHOWING
At 22, he gained a throne
and saved a
kngdom. {
"Alfred the Great"
The dissenter king
'Alfreo~ad te r rea

The Michigan Daily, edited afd man- CAMBRIDGE, Mass ( ) - At- tion indicated they hoped for at
aged by stuaents at the Oniversity ofr rneys for the Massachusetts In- least 1,000 at a n o o n rally at
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Secondjtony
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich- stitute of Technology obtained a MIT's Kresge Plaza before mov-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, court order yesterday banning ing to the International Studies
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues- members of the November Action Center
day through Sunday morning UnIver- mme fteNvme cinCne,
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by Coalition from violence, damage, T h e coalition, an antiwar
carrier. $10 by mail. thefts or illegal demonstrations group wants to shut down De-
Summer Session published Tuesday on the campus beginning today. Tense Department and allied re-
through Saturday morning. Subscrip- T h e temporary restrainer, is- search and development work at
tior rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by sued by Middlesex Superior Court MIT
mail. Judge Thomas J. Spring, does notM
forbid peaceful demonstrations .by! The court order bans the group
______ - _ the group. from using or threatening force
--- __----- __--IThe MIT attorneys introduced or violence against MIT, damag-
as evidence newspaper articles in- ing or defacing records or prop-
dicating the coalition planned to erty, stealing records or property,
'1C yc I es se Iinvade MIT's Center for Inter- congregating within MIT build-
national Studies and the admin- ings or facilities "in such a man-
i n ClaQ S ifeds istration building today to run ner as to disrupt or interfere with
outsome of the faculty and ad- normal functions," blocking en-
ministration should they refuse to trance or exit from any building
--- -- - leave. or inciting anyone to any of the,
Organizers of the demonstra- prohibited acts.
OPENING WEDNESDAY.. .

His election would be considered
by many observers to be a reversal
of the conservative, law-and-order
trend which had swept the nation
earlier in the year.
Democratic candidate Mario
Procaccino, who had emphasized
a law-and-order theme and was
originally favored, is now rated
considerably behind Lindsay, the
Liberal Party candidate.
In Cleveland, Democratic in-
cumbent Carl B. Stokes faces a
strong challenge from Republican
Ralph J. Perk. Stokes, who was
the first black mayor of a major
U.S. city, has charged there have
been racial undertones to his white
opponent's campaign.
Detroit's non-partisan race pits
Wayne County Auditor Richard
Austin against Wayne County
Sheriff Roman Gribbs. Gribbs, a
white, has said he thinks race is
not an issue in the campaign. But
Austin, a black, claims the contest
would have been rated much more
in his favor if he were white.
Austin was given a slight edge
in the final polls, but 18 per cent
of the voters remained uncommit-
ted.
In the New Jersey congressional
race, Republican Eugene Boyle, a
restauranteur, is running against
Democrat Robert A. Roe, the
state's conservation commissioner.

One of the University's most
prominent and best loved alumni,
J. Fred Lawton, 81, of Berkeley,
Mich., died of a heart attack out-
side the stadium last Saturday im-
mediately following the Michigan-
Wisconsin football game.
Lawton, who was co-composer
of the Michigan fight song, "Var-
sity," had been honored during
the half-time ceremonies for his
contributions to the University. He
conducted the Michigan Marching
Band in playing his famous song
shortly before his death.
Prof. William D. Revelli, Uni-
versity director of bands, said,
"We have lost a very dear and
wonderful friend-a man who was
truly devoted in his spirit to the
University of Michigan."
Mr. Lawton, who was born on
Jan. 26. 1888, in Ridgetown, Ont.,
received a bachelor of arts degree
from the literary college. He
went on to serve as a member of
the Detroit Juvenile Court staff,
and later spent 50 years working
for the Mutual Life Insurance Co.
University Regents conferred
upon him the Regents' Citation
of Honor on May 12, 1961 for his
composition of the lyrics to Var-
sity and his other services to the
University.
In addition to the composition
of "Varsity," Lawton was known
for his poetry, particularly a book
published in 1959, "Roses that
Bloomed in the Snow, and Select-
ed Poems." The title of the book
refers to a poem he wrote about
the Michigan-Ohio State game in
1950 which sent Michigan to the
Rose Bowl. For his work he was
named poet-laureate of Berkeley.
Memorial contributions may be
made to the University of Michi-
gan J. Fred Lawton Memorial
fund through the Michigan Alumni
Association, or to the Association
Ior Mentally Retarded Children.

r
r----

HOMECOMING '69 Proudly Presents
THE WINNERS IN THE FLOAT CON

PETITION

ALUMNI AWARD: T
Fraternity-Sorority
Competition
1st-Sigma Alpha Mu-Sigma
Delta Tau
"and they shall beat their
swords into plowshares"
2nd-lambda Chi Alpha-Delta
nL. . . :i .

heta Delta Chi and Sigma Kappa
"AMAZING MOTIONS"
Residence Hall
Competition
1st-Gomberg House-Stockwell
"An Amazing Delivery"
2nd-Fletcher Hall-Bush House
"Daized by Maize"

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS present
by William Shakespeare
Our Thirty-fifth Shakespearean Production
TICKETS at Trueblood Box Office, Frieze Building.
Mon.-Tues., 12:30-5:00 P.M.; Wed.-Sat., 12:30-
8:00 P.M. Phone, 764-5387. SEATS: Wed. & Thurs.,
$1.50 & $2, Fri. & Sat., $2 & $2.50.

"'The LIBERTINE'
COMES ACROSS
INCREDIBLY
WITH WRY
HUMOR
AND TASTE,"
'Cathierna3 Spaa7k
is Curious Green.
with enirj...,and
decides to become
a one-woman
.Knsey sex survey."
-te a ss wa3r.

StartS

tomorrow
no one under
18 will
be admitted
' # ".a2kes
Hugh Heffner'e
Playboy Penttouse
look tike a
nursery scootl"

trim rrv t, x rx u

pU"tUse ID1L...LP

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