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November 02, 1969 - Image 2

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, November 2, 1969

Pa go Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, November 2, 1969

music

NATIONAL 8ENERAL CORPORATION_
NOW FOX EASTERN THEATE$ 00
SHOWING FOH VILLAGE
375 No. MAPLE RD. -769-1300

TIMES
MON.-FRI.

Homecoming: A

test of man

By DANIEL ZWERL)LING
I sira Nero. Richie Havens
a rising rock group called
S ater gave talented and
valiante iforts last night to put
on a good show, despite the best
i uris of the Athletic Events
Bldg to destroy their perform-
: ICU5,
When Ihe acoustics of an
auditorium are so garbled that
they bmr the music instead of
anplifying it. one can only feel
>orry for the performers-- per-
foriners who have spent per-
imps a lifetime cultivating their

styles. channeling their emo-
tions into a voice and an instru-
ment and a song, now all utter-
ly ripped apart by electronics.
Laura Nyro emerged the most
unscathed, and the crowd loved
her most. Her songs float and
fade like disturbed mists, some-
times wispy and so delicate they
barely linger over quiet piano
chords, and then suddenly into
freewheeling exuberance.
New York Tendaberry-Laura
Nyro's latest hit- sings confused
praises of a city which breeds
the neurotic emotionalism of

sensitive souls like Laura Nyro
herself. He's a Runner focuses
on the fright which drives oth-
ers to run from their emotions.
Most of Nyro's songs were quiet,
persive, pausing-most like on
her most recent album. Only
near the end of her short set
did Nyro swing into the strid-
ing cycle of songs like Wedding
Bell Blues, and And When I Die
which characterize her second
and most successful album, Eli's
Confession,
Nyro's voice and poetics could
overcome the acoustics enough
to bring her a long ovation
(which failed to bring her back
after only eight songs). But
Richie Havens with his more
powerful, aggressive voice (too
loud for the mikes) did not fare
so well. Havens is always Richie
Havens - gravel-voiced, loud,
compelling, sometimes excit-
ing but never subtle. He lacks
the nuances which keep a per-
former from becoming tedious.
Every song sounds the same.
Coming on last at 11:30, after
the crowd had already put up
with more annoyance than it
wanted, Havens also spoke a
little too much in between songs
about loneliness, and the grow-
ing brotherhood of man - nice
philosophical gestures, but peo-
ple would rather hear him sing.
But the fatalities of the eve-
ning were neither Nyro nor
Havens. For Nyro is often a
brilliant singer and everyone
who loves her will continue to
buy her records: and Havens
enjoys enough stature through-
out the country to continue
successfully also (he had just
arrived from a concert Friday
night at New York's Philhar-
monic Hall).
Sing requiem instead for the
two groups who filled the first
half of the concert, Napawa's
Pottery Shop - an acid rock
group from New York - and
Sweetwater, a' highly talented,
original group from Los An-
geles.
Napawa is basically just ano-
ther acid band ,except it seems
to put its songs together w i t h
more concern and originality
than the typical fraternity dance
group, using effects like an elec-
tric flute on wah-wah attach-
ment. And it does a fine imi-
tation of the Platters (which
got bigger applause than it s

straight efforts). But any of its
talent died in the amplifiers.
Napawa's singing may have
some good harmonies -- may
have, because no one could hear
more than some static strands.
Voices sounded everywhere in
the auditorium like someone was
screaming through a comb into
a microphone which has waxed
paper for its fibers.
Sweetwater features jazz cello,
organ an( electric piano, drums,
excellent jazz flute, and a girl
who plays guitar and sings in
a beautiful clear voice.
Approaching rock with soph-
istication, they blend r o n d o

and machine
forms, medieval madrigal style their crosslegged seats on the
and middle eastern motifs into floor and return to their proper
a sometimes exciting frame- positions-many of them in the
work - crowds trickled from farthest reaches of that domed
the netherlands of the balcon- monstrosity, which by mid-con-
ies onto the floor to watch and cert are lost in a far away cig-
hear them better. But their arette smoke mist.
voice work, which could h a v e But the crowd, after all, had
been outstanding, buzzed apart paid up to $5 a ticket to see
in the vicious kazoo of the amps. and hear good music. At the
A girl sitting in the fifth row next concert like this, perhaps
claimed she couldn't hear a the people should suggest that
word. unless they can hear the music
People got angry -- with the they're paying for, thousands
lousy acoustics, with the inter- will not only sit on the floor,
minable waits between numbers, but close down the damn build-
with the officious insistence of ing until the University builds a
concert officials that they leave proper auditorium where we
can enjoy fine music. Don't
force performers like Laura Ny-
ro to sing in spaces built for
basketball pets, and into speak-
ers which amplify just as
poorly.
3020 Washtenow, Ph. 434-1782
Between Yosilanti & Ann Arbor
NOW SHOWING
At 22, he gained a throne
and saved a
kingdom.
"Alfred the Great"
The dissenter king
F, . ii I etr()x'(~t

(

SATURDAY-SUNDAY-1:00-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:30
Not tW it matters.,t mst o it is tM
20th CENTURYFOX PRESENTS
KATHRINE R-66
BUTCH CASSIDY AND
THE SUNDANCE K(D
PANAVISIONCOLOR BY DELUXE

I

t ...

I

TODAY AT DIAL
1:30 & 8 P.M. 5-6290
ACADEMY AWARD WINNER!
BEST ACTRESS!
BARBRA STREISAND
COLUMBIA PICTURESam RASTAR PRODUCTIONS vresent
BARBRA OMAR
STh1'EISAND SHARIF

"The Musical Blockbust-
er of the Movie Season,
Any Movie Season!"
Judith Crist, NBC-TV
"' " { x Today at 130
~ Adults $1.50
Tonight at 8:00
i.: ' Adults $2.00

-W -- m
-LDav-Sara Krulwich

IPOl LS 5110W SHIFTS:
ri edict close races
tin ITuesday elctin

Here it cuh-hums! Here it cuh-hums!
LUTHERALLISON
BLUES BAND
TONIGHT
"Luther Allison laid every low (obyiously) with his in
the alley guitar."
-Rolling Stone, Oct. 4, 1969, on Chicago
Blues Festival in Grant Park
$2.50 for the night. Last set $1.50. Doors open at 8

Cumted from Page 1)
cit s 7-2 Democratic enrollment.
He also seemed in line for much
caf the.vwhite middle-class and blue
ooliar vote with his "law and or-
dcr- theme.
But Pro(-Icino plunged in the,
polls during October, after a ser-:
ics of television and radio debates,
in -which the political experts
think he hurt hinslf with angry
utbursts Marchi, too, shed his
usual -calm at least once on the
camera. Gi ly Lindsay remained
A major element in the can-
paigi In recent days has been the
st raw poll conducted by the New
York Daily News. I has shown
Lindsay far ahead of Procaccino
and Maci and added a lift to
the mayors campaign. Procaccino
vet to court to force the news-
paper to disclose how it operated
the poll
The News has endorsed Marchi,i
while the New York Times, the
Nev York Post, the Long Island
Press, and the Staten Island Ad-
vance are supporting Lindsay ed-
itoria'ly..
Lindsays attempt at building a
coalitihn of supporters has been
highly successful He has won the:
endorsement of such prominent
Democrats as former Supreme
CowlI Jut ice Arthur D. Goldberg,
A host of local Democrats desert-
ed Procaccino to support the may-
01'
hen lar u.4 NcA s 1oll, completed
last Wednesday, gave Lindsay 47
per cent of the straws, Procaccino
29 per cent and Marchi 20 per
cent. Only 4 per ent were listed:
as undecided,
One Lindsay action that was
seen as helping him w it h the
Jewih vote -- and plrobably a
brmad sweep of voters - was his
strong antiwar stand on the Oct.
I5 Moratorium Day. Lindsay de-
clared it a day of mourning and
a eda a series of anti-war
rallie.1
In Cleveland, Mayor Carl B.
Stokur, a Democrat and the first
black mar .t of a major U.S. city
lacesa touh opponentt, Reoub-
lican Ralp J. Perk, who is white,
in hi a tempt for re-election.
I ate polls indicate many white
Democrats may rote for Perk and
that Mayor Stokes is being hurt
by a p (lic departnent feud.
S1okes. however. has the support
ot both daily newspapers and the
regular temocratic Party organ-
In New Jersey, voters will de-
cide one of the m o s t bitterly

fought and apparently closest
gubernatorial elections in the
state's history.
The race matches Democrat
Robert B. Meyner, a 61 year old
former governor, against William
T. Cahill, 57, a Republican con-
gressman for 11 years.
Both Democrats and Republi-
cans have said their polls indi-
cate the race is too close to call,I
but neither side has ruled out the
possibility of a 1 a t e trend that
could sweep either major candi-
date into office by a margin of
comfortable if not landslide pro-
portions.
The governor's race h a s at-I
tracted most. of the attention in
New Jersey, which is considered
a barometer of national trends
and which has voted for the win-
ner in presidential elections all
but twice in this century. Presi-
dent Nixon attracted the largest
crowds of the campaign when he;
campaigned with Cahill last weekI
Meyner and Cahill, both law-
yers, have attacked each other at
length in the campaign over al-
leged conflicts of interests.
The major issues have been tax-
es, crime, education and the Viet-
nam war a n d Nixon's spending
priorities.
The chief political question
mark in the campaign has been
the support of Democratic leader
John V. Kenny and the Hudson
County organization which he di-
rects.-
Hudson has been counted on in
the past to provide large plural-
ities for the Democratic candi-
date. But Kenny, at 76 an aging
but powerful figure who has
played important roles in nation-
al campaigns, has a long-standing
feud with Meyner. The Hudson
Democratic organization turned
o u t in force to welcome Cahill
during the campaign, leading to
charges of "boss control" by
Meyner.
(OMPUTA-DATE
'Finds People for
People"
CALL 662-4401

-Daily--Sara Krulwich

DAILY OFFICIAL;
BULLETIN
SU'NDAY, NOVEMBERF~
Day Calendar
International Center Film Series: For-
gotten Americans and Cattle Ranh:r
International Center, 7:30 pm.
Degree Recital: Susan Farquhar, viola:
School of Music Recital Hall, 8:00 p m.
MONDAY, NOVMlIBER 3
Geography Seminar: Prof. Wilfred
Bach, Dept. Environ. Health, Univ. of;
Cincinnati, "Recent Solar Radiation
and Atmospheric Turbidity Research";
4050 LSA, 11:00 am.
Physics and Astronomy {High Energy
Colloquium): M. Longo, "np C h a r g e
Exchange Polarivation from 1 to 6
(eV c"; E. Parker, "np and ninucleus
Total Cross Sections'; P & A Collo-
quium Room, 4:00 p.m.
Placement Service
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 SAB
Placent Interviews held at General
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynart St.. Ann Arbor,
IMlichigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

Division: inquire about the following
companies to see if you have the
.qualifications sought, make appts. be-
fore 4 p.m. day preceding the visit.
A resume is required by the interview-
er, we have forms for you, call early.
763-1360. or come to 3200 S.A.B.
WEEK 01" NOVEMBER 10-14
UpCohn Company.
Gateway Transportation Co.
sraCl AlivatCenter, Inc.
The Travelers
U.S. Department of Commerce
Detroit Bank and Trust
Center for Naval Analyses
CNA Insurance
Kraft Foods
United Fruit Company
Employers Commercial Union
Insurance Group
Wickes Corporation
EDUCATION DIVISION
The following schools will interview

prospective teachers in our office dur-
ing the week of November 10, Addi-
tinal information concerning dates and
fields will be included in our Place-
ment Bulletins and postd on bulletin
boards on campus.
Clawson, Mich.
Wyoming, Mich.
Trenton, Mich.
Adrian, Mich.
Cleveland, Ohio
Birmingham, Mich.
Detroit, Mich.
Inkster, Mich, (Cherry Hill Sch. Dist.)
Utica, Mich.
Farmington, Mich.
Dearborn Hts., Mich. (Sch. Dist. No.
8)
Riverview, Mich.
Garden City, Mich.
To make appointments for inter-
views with these schools contact Mrs.
Krieger, 764-7459.

-- I

UNION-LEAGUE

The University of Michigan

CONTROVERS

'69

6'tter1

Mid Stiuan
is accepting petitions
for the position of
PRODUCER
2531 SAB---663-5408

)oie~

PRESENTS

- a, - __-
-
.

THEY'RE ON THE WAY!

N

The University of Michigan Men's Glee (lub
and
The Ohio State University Men's Glee Club

William F.

Buckley. Jr.
Editor of the National Review, and the author of six books, including The
Unmaking of a Mayor and Up From Liberalism, he promises to be one of
the most talented and entertaining speakers to visit the University in years.
Buckley will face a panel of three distinguished members of the University
community, Prof. Beverly Pooley (Law), Prof. Frithjof Burgman (Philosophy),
and Prof. Steven Tonsor (History), each of whom hold quite different views
from Buckley. His speech will center on civil disorders, campus unrest, and
the democratic process.

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