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October 28, 1969 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-28

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, October 28, 1969

I

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, October 28, 1969

FORMER OFFICIAL:

Educators to vote

Desegregation

policy
A former top Justice Depart-
ment official warned a group of
nearly 85 law students yesterday
to examine all aspects of the de-
partment before agreeing to work
for the Nixon Administration.
"In t h i s particular period of
time, it is incumbent on you to be
quite aggressive to find out what
employment in the, department
would entail," said former Assis-
tant U.S. General Stephen Poll-
ack, referring to Nixon's relaxa-'
tion of desegragation guidelines
in Southern schools.
Pollack, who headed t h e de-,
Partment's civil rights division
under President Johnson, told the
students they should understand
completely the politics involved in
enforcing desegregation and other
civil rights legislation for the gov-
ernment.
"This decision, this hesitation
by the Nixon administration, rep-
resents a retreat in Mississippi,"
he said. "It shows a willingness,
which I think regrettable, to suc-
cumb to public opposition to de-
segregation of Southern schools"
Pollack said of the lawyers who
work for the civil rights division,
'They are part of the administra-
tion and must sometimes take or-
ders on policy decisions affected
by political matters."
Pollack emphasized that al-
though the Nixon administration
is "vacillating" on the desegre-
gation question, it has not denied
government's obligation to en-
force the Supreme Court desegre-
gation rulings.
The a p p a r e n t desegregation
slowdown represents, said Pollack,
"a difference of degree rather
than a change of objective" from
the Johnson administration.
Pollack spoke yesterday at the
request of a group of students who
had originally requested Attorney
General John Mitchell to send a
representative to explaintthis pol-
icy change.
"We sent a letter signed by 274
Law School students to the Jus-
tice Department expressing con-
cern over recent policy changes in
this area," said Daryl Anderson,
U. of M. Ski Club
Western Trip To Aspen
Meetinq: Oct. 28th
Union Ballroom
7:30
or
Contact:
Dave-663-3202
Daryl-761 -0838

blasted
the student who drafted the let-!
ter. Anderson said the Justice De-r
partment declined to send a rep-t
resentative to participate in the
forum.-
The lecture was scheduled tot
coincide with the appearance on,
campus today of two job inter-t
viewers for the Justice Depart-c
ment. Although both were invit-
ed to participate in the forum,
they declined.G
"I'm not in the Civil Rights Di-r
vision." said recruiter Irving Jaf-:
fe, "and I don't want to talk on
something I don't know about."
I can't defend, or not defend
Mr Mitchell, or why he acted the
way he did," said Jaffe. He said
only one of five students he in-
terviewed yesterday morning ex-
pressed dissatisfaction with t h e
Justice Department's recent pol-
icy changes.
Students in the Law School had
discussed Saturday the possibility
of a demonstration against the
Justice Department following Pol-
lack's lecture, but no protest ma-
terialized yesterday. A few of the
85 students at the lecture wore
black mourning armbands, a n d
passed out leaflets before the lee-
ture saying "Justice is dead."
Dr. Rensis Likert, director of
the Institute for Social Research
has been invited to address t h e
15th International Management
Congress scheduled Nov. 4-8 in
Tokyo.
He will discuss "Improving Hu-
man Performance: I;etur Theory,
More Accurate Accounting" t h e
afternoon of Nov. 5 in Tokyos
Hotel New Ottani.

on student
(Continued from Page 1)
the practice teaching programi
there. M a n y officials connected
with state programs of educationi
feel that this is a growing and1
spreading movement.
Shduld the ban on student
teaching become widespread, it
will cause difficulties for educa-1
tion majors attempting to obtain
teacher certification. Current law
requires teachers to have at least+
one semester (equivalent to five'
credit hours) of practice teach-;
ing.
"If the trend becomes wide-
spread, and we keep hearing that
it is growing, then presumably the
State Board of Education would
need to take a look at teacher
certification requirements," said
Edward Pfau, Director of the
Teacher Education and Certifica-
tion Department of the state Of-
fice of Education.

teaching
"Official conversations between
the Michigan Education Associa-
tion and deans and directors of
education across the state haveI
been taking place for some time
now," Pfau said.
Pfau says that one alternative
program to practice teaching is
the "probationary year" require-
ment. After completing the aca-
demic requirements for a degree,
each teacher would be temporarily
certified and be allowed to take a
job in education with the under-
standing that his first y e a r of
work was probationary.
This plan does not allow, how-
ever, for the education graduate
who wishes to teach outside thef
state. That person would s t i11
have to complete t h e one-year
probationary period or would lose
his temporary certification.
"This may well become a state
issue," said Pfau.

Homecoming

69

vn, L/'

presents
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29
UNICEF CHARITY DRIVE
Fishbowl

All Day

_ __
I I

FIND YOUR
OWN THING
on the
DAILY
IBUSINESS
STAFF
see Barb or Phyllis
at 420 Maynard

ti ,
. . - }
,:.
,-
- -
' 4
,
:

i
i
i
bl
I i

All Day
12:00-5:00
8:30 P.M.
12:00-5:00
3:30 P.M.
7:15 P.M.
7:45 P.M.
9:00 P.M.
8:00 A.M.
9:00-12:00
9:15 A.M.
10:00 A.M.
11:00 A.M.
1 :30 P.M.
4:30-6:30
8:30 P.M.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30
UNICEF CHARITY DRIVE
Fishbowl
ALUMNI REGISTRATION
Alumni Association Office, Michigan Union
BLOOD, SWEAT AND TEARS IN CONCERT
University Events Building
Tickets still available
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31
ALUMNI REGISTRATION
Alumni Association Office, Michigan Union
PARADE
PEP RALLY PROCESSION
Markley Hall to Baseball Field
PEP RALLY AT BASEBALL FIELD
DANCE
Featuring Napanaw's Pottery Shop, Floating Opera and Love's Alchemy
IM Building
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1
JUDGING OF HOMECOMING DISPLAYS
ALUMNI REGISTRATION
Alumni Association Office, Michigan Union
TUG-OF-WAR
Island Park
MUD BOWL
Sigma Alpha Epsilon House
DIAG DASH (Four-Legged Blindfolded Race)
Diag
HOMECOMING FOOTBALL GAME
Michigan vs. Wisconsin
ALUMNI RECEPTION Honoring "Fritz" Crisler
Alumni Assembly Hall, Michigan Union
LAURA NYRO, RICHIE HAVENS and SWEETWATER in Concert
University Events Building: Tickets Available

Will

__, ._ ._._.__.. _ _.____________________ __ ______ . E ___ I

hl

Read and1SC eDaily Classifieds

CENTRAL STUDENT JUDICIARY
Announces Open Petitioning
Grads and Undergrads
for
SEVEN SEATS
Sign up for interviews at SGC offices, 1 st floor, SAB
Petitions due Monday, N ovember 3, 5:;00 P.M.

Enjoy Yourself

- Join the Daily Staff Today!

I

_._. -_____________~

''

i

C0

E

TO

ASHI

GTO

ov 14-

ov.15

.00

To help

create

the largest EXPRESSION FOR PEACE in history-

March Against Death-Nov. 14
Delegations from every state, representing American war dead, walking in a single
file solemn procession from Arlington Cemetery past the White House to the
Capitol-
The Michigan delegation marches sometime between 4 and 8 P.M. on Friday, Nov. 14
To participate in the MARCH AGAINST DEATH
you must register with:
ANN ARBOR MARCH AGAINST DEATH COMMITTEE
ANNE FRIEDRICHS-665-0486
INTERFAITH COUNCIL FOR PEACE-663-1870
MRS. FRED LEE-662-1324
TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION-
FRED GREEN-769-7038

Mass March-Nov. 15
March begins from the Capitol area at 11:00 A.M.
Lead by Rev. William Sloane Coffin Jr.
Mrs. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Dr. Benjamin Spock
Proceeds past the White House to the Ellipse
RALLY & FOLK ROCK CONCERT-1-5 P.M.
Music by Peter, Paul and Mary and Bob Dylan
For ticket information
(ALL 662-4431 and ask for "MARCH ON WASHINGTON"
For large group sales
Call AL VELLUCC--761-0200
or PETER KOEPKE-665-3264

Or register when you buy a NEW MOBE-769-2570 for further information

BUS TICKET-$23.00 (round trip)
Michigan Union-9-4, Monday-Friday, thru Oct. 31
BUS LEAVES ANN ARBOR-Nov. 13-8-10 P.M.
BUS LEAVES WASHINGTON-Nov. 15-8-10 P.M.
(so that marchers can also participate in Mass March)
Free overnight accommodations for the March Against

BUS TICKET-$23.00 (round trip)
Michigan Union-9-4 Monday-Saturday thru Nov.
Michigan Union-Thurs., Nov. 13-8-10 P.M.
BUSES LEAVE FRIDAY, NOV. 14-6 to 8 P.M.
BUSES LEAVE WASHINGTON, NOV. 15-10:00 P.M.
BUSES ARRIVE ANN ARBOR, NOV. 16-8-10 A.M.

1

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