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October 24, 1969 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-24

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pace Tcn

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, October 24, 1969

I

Free school tries again ai

'U'

PARIS PE4SCE TALKS:
Lodge remains silent

MEN:
try a new hairstyle designed to
your personality
flascnaaRarbers

MIKE'S STEAKS
Formerly Steak 'rn' Shake-
1313 S.U.

By UICHARD KAGAN
Interested in Yoga, witch-
craft, blues harp and maybe
even frisbee throwing? These
and other esoteric topics are
among the courses offered by
this year's Free University.
The Wayne State Free Uni-
versity is not new to Ann Ar-
bor. In the :41st few years, sev-
eral attempts a. its formation
have been made, but due to in-
adequai te or'.nxani tiion and a
lack of intorcct, it. has faded
out after a brief period of
o1)erat ion.
Hlowever. in ;mite of its abor
tive history. the Free Univer-
sity is still needed here, Mark
Tillotson, co-ordinator of the
university. says. The Free U'i-
versity is able to initiate new
and relevant courses, he ex-
plains. which the University
would probably not have for
severai \_air.

Tillotson's 0onc'eot is to cre-
ate a place for social -inter-ac-
tion and personal intellectual
development without the re-
strictions of an authoritarian,
reward-punishmeit education.
A Free University course is
formed when two or mory xet-
ple with a common interest ard
some motivation decide to hold
a class. Topics and direction for
each class are deteimined by
the class-members themselves
with the assistance of an in-
structor.
Enthusiasm is the only cre-
denial required to be a -arope
leader. A college drop-out, could
conduct a class on community
power structure or a policeman
could teach a course in law and
order.
The goal of the Free Univer-
sity, says Tillotson, is to pro-
vide an "open-ended experi-
ence," so there is no syllabus

or time limit. A class may go
on for years, as a course on the
John Kennedy assasination did
at a Free University in Cali-
fornia.
Any type of class is con-
ceivable. At Wayne State
where 20 free university class-
es are in-operation, a Metho-
dist minister holds a class
called "Come let us play God."
Other classes include s u c h
topics as "Woman as nig-
ger," mysticism, "Who gov-
erns the university," comput-
er operation, and a study of
ESP.
The hardest problem Tillot-
son envisions is obtaining
funding from the University
or some other organization in
order to print up a catalogue
and organize publicity.
He believes there will be no
problem in gutting student
support, and will hold his first

organizational meeting today
at 4:00 p.m. in Room 3524 of
the SAB.
However in the past, the
Free University could not sur-
vive on this campus because
of a lack of organized sup-
port. In 1966 interest in a free
universiy led several profes-
sors to hold additional classes
for interested students.
Also in the summer of 1968
thre' hundred students form-
,d th Ann Arbor Free School
which offered classes on
campus, utopian communities,
guerrilla theatre, and tactics
for social change.
But the Free School declined
during the ensuing academic
semester. Its lack of structure
even led the people in the
course on utopian communi-
ties to break contact with the
Fro School and try to start
their own utopian society.

'Continued from Page 1)
Speaking to newsmen after the
meeting, Lodge said that no par-
ticular statement made by t h e
other side provoked his action.
"It was a whole long series that's
been going back for weeks and
months and today was more of
the same," he said.
"There is obviouf ly not much
sense sitting there trying to re-
spond when they are saying the
same old intransigent and vitu-
perative things," said Lodge. "I
hope our action today may call
attention generally to the com-
pletely negative attitude which
has consistently characterized the
other side, and that there may be
progress in the future."
Meanwhile new fighting raged
on old battlefields in the central
highlands and around Tay Ninh
City, U.S. Command spokesmen
said Wednesday.
There was no pattern in the
string of fights to indicate a new
offensive, but both areas -
scenes of some of the war's major
battles - had been relatively quiet
during the past four months.
U.S. and government t r o o p s
killed 75 North Vietnamese a n d

Viet Cong while suffering one
killed and four wounded, the Arborland-Maple Villoae
spokesmen said. OPEN 3 NIGHTS Double Charbroiled
North Vietnamese army troops, Mon.-Thurs.-Fri.-9-8 a r and
who lost 12 men in a Sunday Tues.-Wed.-Sat,-9-6 Hamburger and
clash, set an ambush around a Bowl of Homemade
U.S. armored personnel carrier ON CAMPUS
that had been damaged and 8:30-5:30 Soup - $1.10
abandoned in the Sunday fight.
CENTRAL STUDENT JUDICIARY
Announces Open Petitioning
Grads and Undergrads
for
SEVEN SEATS
Sign up for interviews at SGC offices, ist floor, SAB
Petitions due Monday, November 3, 5:00 P.M.

3

STATE SENATE PROPOSAL:
Discipline asken 0 t

X X ..... .. ......

By The Associated Press
A move to force Michigan State
University to expell and prosecute
150 black students for a disruptive
incident Tuesday failed to gain
immediate support in the Senate
yesterday.
The motion, introduced by Sen.
John Bowman (D-Wyandotte re-
suited from an attempted seizure
of a dormitory cafeteria Tuesday
night.
So far MSU authorities have not
indicated whether any disciplinary
action will be taken.
Protesting the alleged harrass-
ment of a black student the night
before, some members of the Black
Liberation Front (BLF) entered
Holden Hall's cafeteria Tuesday
night. They reportedly carried at
least one billy club and told stu-
dents there to leave.
The dormitory administrators
then closed the cafeteria and told
students to eat at Wilson Hall.
On Monday night Sam Riddle,
a member of the BLF, tried to
enter the cafeteria through the
back door. Tom Haring, a student
cafeteria employe, told him no one
is allowed to enter through that
door. What happened after that is
not clear, but a fist fight began.
Haring has filed assault and bat-
tery charges against Riddle.
Bowman called the students "a
bunch of hoodlums trying to 'iet
their cause . . . into the limelighi''
and said MSU officials "can no
longer say it's just a little tan-
Bowman's resolution said the
students "walked into the cafe-
teria . . . and in a manner remins-

cent of the storm troopers of NAZI
Germany demanded that all wlielos
leave the dining room."
He urged that officials take "im-
mediate and strong action against
the perpetrators of this outra e
and that criminal action be in-
stituted against them and if they
are found to be students at the
university that they be expelled."
Sun. Coleman Young 'D-De-
rroit) told Bowman "The whole
. resolution is racist."
.Ie cited language in the resolu-
tioin, as first printed, that called
the students "black hooligans" ;nd
black bums."
Bowman denied writing the res-

olution with those terms, saying
someone in the legislative service
bureau had come up with the lan-
guage. Bowman struck the words
"hooligans" and "bums."
Sen. Gary Byker (R-Hudson-
ville) moved that the Senate take
up the resolution immediately, by-
passing the scrutiny generally ac-
corded resolutions in the Senate
Business Committee.
Senate business chairman Rob-
ert Vanderlaan (R-Grand Rapids)
opposed the motion as did Sen-
ators Gilbert Bursley (R-Ann Ar-
bor), and Basil Brown (D-High-
land Park).

GOOMmlD
andS

FOOD
ER VICE

WOW!
A three-piece Treasure Chest
chicken dinner, plus trench tries,
fur only /9! Lorger take-home
orders also. Try a box soon!!
u-s
lLiNG SPEEOY Q ERlVCE
West of Arborland

Dr. Furstenberg

E x-dean o
1-Ied school
dies at 79
Dr, Albert C. Furstenberg, Dean
emeritus of the University's Medi-
'al School died yesterday at St.
Josep~h's Mercy hio.pital. Dr. Fur-
4enberg had been a patient since
April when ne sulffred a streke.
it' was 79.
D r. Furstenb'x'g 'av a s uerhtus
(me of Gie i t. known phvsicians
ni Michigan. As D an of the inv,-:-
cal school he supervised sweeping
:hanges at 'e Me' cal Center.
Dr. Fursteneg was dean of tUe
.rhool from 19:3c ,itil 1959 ad
vas the fouth e in appointed
o the post in t ii'chool's 117-
ear history.
'In i770other profession ate
.aandards as high or as well en-
orced mo i tI tn and v;;trhow
and nowhe(re else has t here~ been
is rapid proeress in t'e last txen-
y years,' he once sd about ned-
11cine.
,Medicine is a h 'ier wav of life
han any other." Di'. Furster ber
old his student ,, 'if a p r'son s
villing to devote his life to i " He
.:as an ear, nose, and throat spec-
aist, but was interested In ail
'nedicine.
P~rivate fi1nieral sei'vices art, be-
ingr arranged:c.
1 M dical train
A 15-week course in emergeiicy
diieQcal training is being offered
o policiem n, firemen. and ambu-
ance d:is'!,a in Washtenaw Coun-
y aid surr0undini a'eas by Ann
Arbor chapter of the American
Colig, of Surgeons.
The classes. which are free to
.articipants. will be held at Uni-
ersity Hospital on Thursday eve-
ings. -he course will run until
Jan. 29.
'he course was offered for the
iirst time last year. Dr. William
C. Grabb, associate professor of
surgery at the U-M Medical
,School. is course coordinator.
COMPUTA-DATE
"Finds People for
People"
CALL 662-4401
iA

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GIEEK AHT
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FEATURES THESE DINNERS: .
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Bar-B-Q Beef Fried Chicken
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Fried Oysters
All Dinners Include Fries, Slaw, and Bread

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668U-9 )J

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Dancing Friday, Saturday, and Sunday
Friday and Saturday Starting 9 P.M.
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City Parking Lot in rear of Restaurant
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Fri., Sat.-1 1 a.m. to 3 a.m.

314 Detroit St.

665-2266

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LUNCHES, DINNERS, SNACKS
512 E. WILLIAM ST.
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GO TO BLAISE'S
If it is good food Y'want, that is.
Himself Is Featuring
A BOUNTIFUL BRUNCH
All Y'can eat, of course
for $2.50
From 9:30 A.M. 'til 1:30 P.M.
HURON at FOURTH
Res: Phone 769-2455, 769-3074
MIKE and JOE
CA
Invite
You and Your Date to Casa Nova
for
PIZZA, ITALIAN

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Located in Scenic Northern Ann Arbor Area (Dixborit
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NSTA LL A TION

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