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October 24, 1969 - Image 9

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Friday, October 24, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine'

Friday, October 24, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

_________________B~ilCusumano_____

GIRLS

at

last!

'l
f
',,

Love letters
from the fans r
Dissent is a noble thing. It's an All-American virtue, or soe
some would have us believe. Thus it happens that we sometimes gete
letters at The Daily disagreeing with the wonderful words that wec
print.
We welcome these letters, despite the fact that they are nevert
complimentary. They are classified as hate mail and we get a bigc
laugh out of them. Who knows, maybe we're just masochists. Actually,C
I'm more inclined to think that the chuckles come because the lettersp
usually display more ignorance than they accuse us of showing.
Two such epistles of joy were printed in yesterday's paper, al-
though one person felt we would never have the nerve to do so.-
Well, we not only were nice enough to print the derogatory letters
but I'm going to lower myself and reply to them.t
In essence, The Daily sports staff in general and Andy Barbas
and myself in particular were accused of being biased reporters, im-t
mature and writing a false account of Saturday's Michigan Statet
game. Mr. Thomas Garrett commented that, "There were numerous
paragraphs loaded with complicated explanations of how the Wol-
verines handed the game to MSU through errors. This becomes ludi-c
crous when one considers that there was another team on the field
that was obviously forcing those errors."8
Score one point for Mr. Garrett in being correct about the para-r
graphs describing the game as being lost because of errors; he is
right there. But subtract two for his assumption that State forced1
those errors. Obviously Mr. Garrett did not see the contest.t
The first big mistake made by Michigan was Glenn Doughty'sc
fumble of a pitch-out in the first quarter. There was not a potentialr
MSU tackler within seven yards. Doughty had time to fumble the ball,1
retrieve it, and even evade one tackler before being dropped. Maybes
Mr. Garrett thinks that the green State uniform was enough to scare
Doughty; I personally doubt it.
The second big mistake was Don Moorhead's fumble of a centerI
snap. Once again there was no tackle made before the error. Ex-
plain that, if you will, Mr. Garrett.
The third error was Doughty downing a kick in his own
end zone for a safety. I will have to maintain once more that State
could have had nothing to do with the miscue, unless, of course,
someone las'soed Doughty from the stands. Maybe it was Mr. Garrett.
Finally, there is the matter of the Wolverines' costly penalties,
especially those brought on by unsportsmanlike conduct. Unless
Duffy Daugherty hypnotized the Michigan team before the game
they certainly were not brought on by any Spartan actions. As a
matter of fact, the only mistake that State forced all day was a
fumble by Tom Curtis which Michigan recovered.
Mr. Garrett screams that we are biased, though, and compares
our reporting to that done in Prague. Perhaps the distortion actually
lies on his side. He states that "Duffy's boys beat yours," and they
certainly did. However, they did not do it because of the superiority
which Mr. Garrett asserts. From that I am forced to conclude that he
just might be a State fan.
At least the second letter came from three MSU students who
immediately identified themselves. While they can understand our
disappointment in losing, we can also sympathize with their wish
to see the Spartans described in glowing terms.
However, I am not in the habit of criticizing just because my by-
line might be on the front page. The Daily prides itself on its pro-
fessionalism and a conscious effort is made to maintain it. A news-
paper is designed to report the truth and what is true can only be
that which the reporter sees.
I saw the Michigan State game in its entirety and thus am some-
what qualified to describe what happened. Others may disagree with
me and that is their right. But to call me biased and unobjective, as
did the State students, is a charge which I challenge them to sup-
port.
My job in the fall is to report on Michigan football and I work
at that job. Along with a gentleman named Eric Siegel I would
venture to say that we have seen more of the Wolverine squad than
anyone outside of the official team and staff. I have seen enough of
this team in games and practice to be able to tell you when they
play as well as they can and when they don't. The Daily's detractors
can't make the same claim.
The Daily is criticized for deserting a losing team and showing
immaturity by pointing out the same in our team. Let it be under-
stood that The Daily will never desert Michigan football because it
is basically ours along with the rest of the students. But we will not
desist from criticizing when it is required and from reporting the
truth at all times.
We are told that the State News never criticized elements of im-
maturity in their team when they occurred. My answer to that and
to the charges of bias is that when I do reach the stage where I
don't report on all reasons for victory or defeat I will have stopped
being a reporter and turned into a public relations man.
Apparently our letter writers would like that; I wouldn't. If
the day comes when I stop getting mail from such people I will
know that I have stopped doing my job.
Professional Standings'

By MORT NOVECK
Michigan's basketball coaches
have a secret weapon this year,
and it's not Tartan Turf.
Aside from the obvious prob-
lems confronting the coaches
coming from the courts, another
problem has always existed at
Michigan's Events Building. No
matter how the game is going out
on the floor, nothing resembling
enthusiastic crowd support ever
emanates from the fans in the
crowd.
While this problem could be at-
tributed to the excessive splendor
of the fans' surroundings, Head
Coach Johnny Orr and his top
assistant Fred Snowden felt the
problem lay in another area.
Michigan, alone among the Big
Ten universities had no female
cheerleaders.
Not only could girls help arouse
the fans they felt, but further the
girls could help excite the basket-
ball squad. After witnessing how
the Purdue cheerleaders fired up
the Boilermaker squad during a
game last year Snowden told a
Daily reporter, "We've got to get
ourselves some girl cheerleaders."
Ergo, Snowden and Oree pre-
sented their idea to Athletic Di-
rector Don Canham, who, accord-
ing to Orr, was receptive. Can-
ham then forwarded the proposal
to the Board in Control of Inter-
collegiate Athletics, which, in a
rare flash of wisdom, approved
it for the curreut basketball sea-
son, on a trial basis of course.
With the help of Gymnastics
Coach Newt L o k e n, Barbara

put into operation.
Fifty-four eager coeds appeared
for Tuesday's initial tryouts and
while the field had narrowed by

According to Orr, "I think it's
terrific. This was a Snowden and
Orr production from the start. It's
great."

Pomey, wife of Assistant Basket- I Both Snoweden and Orr were
ball Coach George Pomey, and very happy at the prospect of hav-
Lannie Loken, the proposal was ing girls to cheer their squad on.

last night's finals, there was still Snowden was also pleases at
a virtual plethora of warm young the thought saying, "Beautiful,
beautiful. This will add a great
deal to our basketball program
dand if things go well this winter
maybe next fall . . .?
Assistant Athletic Director Bumpl
Elliott, while less ecstastic than
Snowden or Oree seemed pleased.
"I think that it's important to
NIGHT EDITOR: look and see what happens but I
ELLIOTT BERRY expect the idea to be successful."
More Sports Page 7 The girls trying out for the
squad were also, naturally, ex-
I cited at the prospect of becon-
bodies anxious for their chance ing Michigan cheerleaders.
to demonstrate their skills at While most could not articulate
chanting such gems as "BEAT the exact reason for their pres- for a bunch of mm . Secondy, since
STATE, BEAT STATE." Ience at the tryouts the general women's athletics re not publi-
The girls were judged in three reason seems to nave been that cized and have no cheerleaders,
areas. Cheerleading ability, agil- "We've always been cheerleaders." men should cheer for the gins if
ity, and personality. A panel of Others called themselves masicists
nine judges repres. nting vario,.ts while one girl, who might have them. Lastly, since cheerleadirg
interests on campus was empow- found the true reason said, "We're is a socio-emotional function and
ered to make the selec ons. all exhibitionists." since Women's Liberation is more
Hours after the first prospect Though some campus elements interested in task function the
had shown her stuff the winners as Pan-Hel and IFC demonstrat- Iwhole thing is none of their busi-
were announped. Since there are ed their support for the project ness.
eight letters in Michigan it was by serving as judges, other campus Other campus elements, includ-
decided that there would be eight elements were not aroused by the ing the male football cheerleaders
cheerleaders, thought of girl cheerleaders. seem to support the idea. Whmn
The lucky victors were: Claryce When first contacted, a repre- queried on the suriect at a home
Gibbons, '73; Jo Johnson, '73; sentative of Women's Liberation } football game inosr of ther
LannI LoMntz, '71; Judy Mae, stated, "I don't think we'd even thought the fans would prefer
'73; ndy ' Beth Ober- I bother making a statement about girls.
idr, '73r; WendyPason,3 ' something like that." When press- The leader of the alumni cheer-
ed for a comment, however, th leaders also supported the idea
Imovement got together and hast-jledrasouprtdheIa
ily formulated a platform, saying, "I don't care if they wear
Their first point was that it's pants or skirts, ps long as they
no big thrill to jump up and down can cheer."

'ospe.t gives her all

I

CAMPUS APPROVEDI

SGC ELECTIONS
November 10-11
PETITIONING OPEN
FOR COUNCIL SEATS
PETITIONS DUE OCT. 31
" 6 Full Term Seats
* 3 Half Term Seats
See MRS. SAMUELSON
SGC OFFICES, SAB

Be at ease and casually correct, in the
classic Sahara Boot. Fashioned for deep-
down comfort in brush-clean Sand Buck
with long-wearing genuine natural crepe
soles and heels.

MEN'S
Fleece Lined $13.95
Unlined $12.95

WOMEN'S
Fleece Lined $10.95
Unlined $9.95

CAMPUS BOOTERY
304 S. STATE ST.

Flipping for the judges
WANTED...
BASKETBALL OFFICIALS
* GOOD PAY
0 INTERESTING WORK
0 NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY
WE WILL TRAIN
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING THURSDAY,
Oct. 28, 7:00 P.M.-IM Bldg.
FUN WORKING IN EUROPE

HOMECOMING '69
presents
MOTIONS IN MAIZE
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29

10:00 A.M.-4:00 P.M.

UNICEF CHARITY DRIVE

Fishbowl
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30

N B A
Eastern Division
W L
Philadelphia 3 0
Milwaukee 3 0
New YorkJ 5 I
Baltimore 2 1
Detroit 1I
Cincinnati 1 3
Boston 0 3
Western Division
#tlanta 2 1
San Francisco 2 1
Los Angeles 2
4an Diego 1 2
Chicago 1 2
Phoenix 1 3
"eattle 0 4

Pct
1 .00
1 .00
.S5
.66'
.50
.25
.00
.66
.66
.50,
.33
.33
.'-5
.00,

Mon
New
t GB Toro
0 '6 Chic
0 ..
7 - Oakl
7 1 I St. L
A0 1"l Minn
0 21, Philk
0 3 Losl
Pitts
7 -
- ,Dc
)0 ' _.
3 1 Bos
3 114
0 2 a
GF GA
18 6
15 10

treal
York
mto
ago
and
,ouis
nesota
adelphia
Angeles
burgh
Ye
troit 2, P
ston at 0

2 0 3
2 2 1
1 3 1
0 5 1
Western Division
3 2 1
3 1 1
3 3 0
1 1 3
2 3 0
0 3 3
sterday's Results
Philadelphia 2, tie
Today's Games
Oakland

7
5
3
1
7
7
6
5
4
3

18
10
11
7
13
20
18
10
10
11

10
13
11
22

10:00 A.M.-4:00 P.M.

UNICEF CHARITY DRIVE
Fishbowl

18
12
14
13
14
18

8:30 P.M.

BLOOD, SWEAT, AND TEARS in concert
University Events Building

GUARANTEED JOBS ABROAD! Get paid, travel, meet people,
SUMMER and YEAR ROUND. 20 countries, 9 paying job cate-
gories offered. For FREE cultural program literature including
details and applications, write: ISIS, Admissions, 133 rue Hotel
des Monnaies, Brussels 6, Belgium. A Non-Profit Student Mem-
bership Organization.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER
3:30 P.M. 1
7:15 P.M. 1

PARADE
PROCESSION TO PEP RALLY

Yesterday's Games
San Francisco 112, New York 10
Tonight's Gaines
Cincinnati at Baltimore
Atlantal at Boston
New York at Detroit
Milwaukee at Los Angeles
Chicago at Phoenix

THIS CAN GET YOUR
HEAD TOGETHER

7:45 P.M.
9:00 P.M.

Markley Hall
PEP RALLY
Baseball Stadium
DANCE
IM Building

N 1 L
Eastern Division
AV L T
340 1
3 1 1

Pt.
9
7

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1

4

Lead your own life.
Enjoy it.
Don't let life let you down
because of a silly head-
ache. Happiness is as far
away as an Anacinbottle.
Anacin is twice as strong
in +he nprifin roin r

9:15 A.M.

It

TUG-OF-WAR
Island Park

10:00 A.M.
1 1 :00 A.M.

MUDBOWL
SAE House
DIAG DASH
4-lenned rnce on the Dina

w"GET
M"PNWAR tm

i

I

I

I

I

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