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October 24, 1969 - Image 7

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Friday, October 24, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Friday, October 24, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

McCOY PROWLS:
O.J.. s
By SANDI GENIS
"Oh, no! Not you again!" ex-
claimed the mighty 0. J. Simpson
as Mike McCoy barreled into him
for the umpteenth time on rout
to holding the Heisman Trophy
winner to 55 yards rushing - tt
lowest single game output of his
entire collegiate career.
While that action occurred last
season, those same words might
just as easily have been uttered
last Saturday, when Notre Dame
tackle Mike McCoy, as if in an
instant replay of that last cam-
paign against USC, reeked havoc
upon third-ranked Trojan's of-
fense, limiting Simpson's dynamic
successor, Clarence Davis, to a
mere 75 yards, as the Irish fought
the Trojan's to a 14-14 standstill.
the second tie in a row.
This spectacular performance
was nothing out of the ordinary
for the 6'5". 274 lb. McCoy. A
pre-season All-America defensive
tackle, McCoy has won the Her-
ing Award for the past three years

nemesis continues conquests

The Centicore Bookshop

and Harper &

Row, Publishers

as the outstanding lineman in
spring practice,
In Notre Dame's first clash of
this season, against Northwestern,
McCoy made eight solo tackles,
threw the opposing quarterback
for a pair of losses totaling nine
yards, and intercepted a pass,
prompting Wildcat coach A 1e x
Agase to say that McCoy "has to
be one of the two finest tackles in
the country."
Excellence has been a tradi-
tion with McCoy since high
school. After spending a year in
the seminary where he played his
first organized football, having
been too big to play in any of the
parochial leagues, he transferredj
to Cathedral High School in Erie,
Pa. There he earned eleven let-
ters in football, wrestling, a n dI
water polo, leading his football
and wrestling teams to city cham-
pionships, and earning all-state
and Big 33 honors in his seniorj
year.
Hoping to attend a Catholic
university, McCoy jumped at the

chance to attend Notre D a m e
when they offered him a scholar-
ship because he felt that there he
"would get a good education and
have the opportunity to play good
football."
As a part time starter during
his sophomore season, an exper-
ience he terms "strange", he
sparkled, making 43 tackles and
deflecting two passes. The follow-
ing season he led all the Irish
linemen with 72 tackles and seven
pass deflections. Now a senior, he
appears well on his way to his
best season ever and an almost'
certain All-American berth.
McCoy attributes both his and
his team's great success to h a r d
work, dedication, and good coach-
ing. He feels that coach Ara Par-
segian, whom he terms "not only;
a great coach, but a great person,"
has instilled in his players n o t.
only the desire to win but also
pride, the pride in onesself and
in ones school that has become
so much a part of the heritage
of Notre Dame.

Concerning the season, he looks
to the Irish to finish their cam-
paign with an 8-1-1 record, but
is the first to admit that in the
game of football anything can
happen. However, he is convinced
that with outstanding gridders
like Joe Theismann, Bob Olson,
Jim Reilly, and Dennis Allen, the
Irish can finish in the top ten.
Discussing the team's only loss,
to the Boilermakers of Purdue,
McCoy felt that the team did not
play to its full capability and also
credited Purdue quarterback
Mike Phipps, whom he considers
one of the better quarterbacks
in the nation, with doing "a hell-
uva job" in directing his team.
Referring to last Saturday's
contest with the Trojans, he was
quick to acknowledge the talent of
USC quarterback Jimmy Jones,
and, of course, that of running
back Clarence Davis, both of
whom he feels have tremendous
futures before them.
When asked about his own fu-
ture, the Economics major who
lists hand ball, basketball and ice
skating as his outside interests,
readily admits that he w o u 1 d
like to play professional football,
if the opportunity arises. He also
plans to attend law school.
Another of McCoy's secret de-
sires is his wish for the oppor-
tunity to face Rex Kern and the
Ohio State Buckeyes whom he
feels will most certainly repeat
as national champs, on the foot-
ball field. He considers Kern a
"helluva quarterback" and con-
fesses that he would very much
enjoy "knocking him off."

Invite you to a Reception

to Honor the Publication

of

DONALD HALL'S
New Book of Poetry
"THE ALLIGATOR BRIDE"

Mike McCoy

Lacrosse season ends tonight

By JOEL GREER
Michigan's lacrosse team will
enter tonight's intersquad scrim-
mage with the needed experience
to provide the usual hard-hitting
action of championship lacrosse.
Last Saturday's game with Ohio
State gave the predominantly
rookie squad their first taste of
competitive action.
Despite the 10-1 defeat Coach
"Skip" Flanagan was quite pleas-
ed with the overall performance.
The stickmen started the game
w i t h an entirely rookie defense
and Ohio State's fine attack re-
sulted in a 5-0 Michigan deficit
at the end of the first quarter. In
fact two of the thre eMichigan
defensemen had never seen a la-
crosse game before Saturday.
However there was amazing
improvement as the game went on.
Flanagan expressed his optimism
in his review of the game. "The
defense cane along as the game
progressed, and by the fourth
quarter there were more Buckeyes
on the ground than anybody."
The major faults in the game
Saturday were the lack of b a 11
control and the spasmodic attack.
Ohio State's midfield controlled
the loose balls and the face-offs
as they held the ball nearly 75 per
cent of the time. The disappoint-
ing attack had Bob Gillon pro-

ducing Michigan's only tally late'
in the fourth quarter.
Defensive coach Bob Kamani
noted that the stick-handling was
rather poor but it would work out!
as the players became more ex-
perienced. Kaman had special
praise for goalie Jay Johnson in-
dicating t h a t without his out-
standing play the Bickeye score
would have been much higher.
Tonight's festivities, the last of
the year, will have everyone i:1
action. Coaches Flanagan and Ka-
man both look forward to play-
ing and the fans should keep their
eye on both of them since Flan-
agan was an All-American at Rut-
gers and Kaman was an All-Ivy
defenseman at Pennsylvania.
Participating on either side will
include senior defenseman John
Synhorst, who was last year's
captain, and leading scorer Boa
Gillon. Newcomers at defense will
GUILD HOUSE
-802 Monroe
Friday, Oct. 24
Noon Luncheon-25c
SPEAKER:
MARTY McLAUGHLIN,
SGC President
(Series: "The Guild Grill")

be Tim Cotter, who started in last
week's game, and Ned Bush. Util-
ity man Bob Mocne who played'
midfield against Ohio State wrill'
be in one of the goals. Jay John-
son will occupy the other.
The game which will be played
tonight at 7:45 p.m. on the Tar-
tan turf at Ferry field will be a
high scoring affair. It will serve'
as a great introduction to t h e
"world's fastest game on two
feet!"

over the country for bowl invita-
tions, McCoy calmly admits that
he is glad that Notre Dame ad-
heres to a policy of abstention
from such games, because it gives
Trish gridders an opportunity to
catch up in their studies and, in
a less serious vein, because it
saves them all the discomfort of
practicing in three feet of snow.
TONIGHT
THE
SOLAR WIND

Mr. Hall will hold forth
at the Bookshop on Sunday
with an Autographing Party,
Informal Verse Reading, Assorted Feats of Strength
and Much More
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26th, THREE TO EIGHT P.M.
CENTICORE BOOKSHOP
1229 South University, in University Towers

t

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As the scramble is on in
various athletic conferences

the
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9:30-$1.00
605 E. William

at THE HOUSE
1429 HILL STREET
YIDDISH WEEK
SATURDAY, OCT. 25
7:30 P.M. and 9:30 P.M.
THE YIDDISH FILM CLASSIC "THE GOLEM"
THURSDAY, OCT. 30
8:00 P.M.
THE YIDDISH FILM "BRIEVELE DER MAME"
ADMISSION CHARGE 75c
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SERVING BIG 10SCHOOLS SINCE 1961
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I

1972

Senator George McGovern
YOUR NEXT PRESIDENT?
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26, Hill Aud., 2 P.M.
TICKETS: 1 .25-Union, League, Fishbowl
and at the door

RUMORS DENIED
We at Discount Records feel Finally, any idea that this
that our devotion to art and classic disc ridicules football
dedication to simple justice must be laughed out of court;
compel us to take a stand. it is obvious to the objective
The irresponsible rumors raging listener that Miss Suzuki dis-
through artistic circles in Ann plays enthusiasm for body-
Arbor must be stopped. contact sports of all kinds.
We refer of course to the Not lightly do we call this
whispers about Pat Suzuki's record a classic. In the eight
amazing recording of the great years since its release, it has
Michigan fight song, "The been acclaimed (or condemned)
Victors." as Pop, Camp, and even Op (by
It is not true that you must those who like to watch the
be over 18 to buy this record. label go around).
Reports that enraged alumni Reports from graduate stu-
buy dozens of copies in order to dents in social psychology that
destroy them are surely exag- roommates of people owning
gerated. Our private investi- the record shout, "Play that
gators have found no truth in 'Victors' one more time and I'll
the story that the recording go out of my mind!" lead us to
was secretly sponsored by hope that it may even qualify
Michigan State University as as Psychedelic.
part of a campaign to smear That the performance, so
its rival. vital and challenging through
We emphatically deny the the years, should be bought by
rumor that U. of M. athletes every music lover is the wish of
are forbidden by their coaches Discount Records, which has
to listen to it on the grounds the world's largest stock. Loy-
that it might demoralize them. alty can go no further. Hail.
PAT SUZUKI'S "HAIL TO THE VICTORS"

Come as you are!
NOVEMBER 5, 1969
Now's the time to sign up at your placement office for an interview with the Bethlehem Steel Loop
Course recruiter. This could be the start of something bigl
And just what IS the Bethlehem Steel Loop Course? Glad you asked! It's our management
development program for graduates with bachelors' or advanced degrees.
Bethlehem loopers (150 to 200 every year) spend four swinging weeks at our home offices in
Bethlehem, Pa. Then, primed with information about the entire corporation and rarin' to go, they re-
port to the appropriate plants or departments for their first assignments. Then, onward and upward!
Where would YOU fit into the Loop Course? Check your degree or the one most similar to it:

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING--Engineering or me-
chanical maintenance departments of steel plants, fabri-
cating works, mining operations, and shipyards. Fuel
and combustion departments. Supervision of production
operations. Marine engineering assignments In Ship-
building Department. Also: Sales or Research.
METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING-Metallurgical de-
partments of steel plants and manufacturing operations.
Engineering and service divisions. Technical and super-
visory positions in steelmaking departments and rolling
mills. Also: Research or Sales.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS-Technical and supervisory
positions in coke works, including production of by-
product chemicals. Fuel and combustiqn departments,
including responsibility for operation and maintenance
of air and water pollution control equipment. Engineer-
ing and metallurgical departments. Steelmaking opera-
tions. Also: Research or Sales.
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING-Positions in steel plants,
fabricating works, shipyards, and mines. Engineering
and maintenance departments. Supervision of steel-
making, rolling, manufacturing, and fabricating opera-
tions. Also: Sales.
CIVIL ENGINEERING-Fabricated Steel Construction
assignments in engineering, field erection, or works
manaement Steel olant, mire, or shipyard assign-

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING-Steel plant, fabricating
works, mining operations, and shipyard electrical en-
gineering, construction, and maintenance departments.
Technical and supervisory positions in large production
operations involving sophisticated electrical and elec-
tronic equipment. Also: Research or Sales.
MINING ENGINEERING-Our Mining Department op-
erates coal and iron ore mining operations and lime-
stone quarries, many of which are among the most
modern and efficient in the industry. This 10,000-man
activity offers unlimited opportunities to mining en-
gineers. Also: Research.
NAVAL ARCHITECTS AND MARINE ENGINEERS-
Graduates are urged to inquire about opportunities in
our Shipbuilding Department, including the Central
Technical Division, our design and engineering organi-
zation. Also: Traffic.
OTHER TECHNICAL DEGREES-Every year we recruit
loopers with technical degrees other than those listed
above. Seniors enrolled in such curricula are encour-
aged to sign up for an interview.
ACCOUNTANTS-Graduates in accounting or business
administration (24 hours of accounting are preferred)
are recruited for training for supervisory assignments
in our 3,000-man Accounting Department.
OTHER NON-TECHNICAL DEGREES-Graduates with

ATTENTION
SENIORS
A representative of the Lincoln National Life
Insurance Company will be in Ann Arbor on

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