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October 24, 1969 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-24

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P'age Six

THE MICHIGAN DRILY

Friday, October 24, 1969f

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, October 24, 1 9~9

We're in debt
to
wars,
floods,
health
services,
life saving
and
Eblood banks.
help
us
help
The A meron Red Cross.
ad.ttising conibut df10 he public good

.....***g.. **.*.**g.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

r -

BUY NOW

Prices Wil l

Increase

November 1st
on Super Slims
and

"White"

Levis

OPEN FRIDAY EVENINGS

i <
.

Thel Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication ofThe Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
3528 LSA before 2 p.m. of the day
preceding publication and by .?
p.m. Friday for Saturday and Sun-
day. Items may appear only once.
Student organization notices a r e
not accepted for publication. For
iniormation, phone 764-9270.
FRIDAY, OCTOBEl 24
Day Calendar
Astronomical Colloquim: J. G. Hills,
Dept. of Astronomjy, "Computer Simu-
lations of Systems f Strongly Interact-
ing Planets"; 296 Physics-Astronomy,
41:00 p.m.
University Philharmonia: Theo Al-
cantara, conductor and Endre Granat.
violin soloist: Hill Aud., 8:00 p.m.
General Notices
Representatives from the Law School
of Harvard University will be in 1223
Angell Hall on Thursday evening, Oc-
tober 29 at 7:30 to meet with students
interested in the study of law, A re-
presentative from aCse Western Re-
serve Law School will be in the coun-
seling office on Monday, October 27.
Students wishing to make appoint-
merts should contact Mrs. Towle at
40312 or in 1223 Angell Hall.
Placement Service.
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 SAB
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Vista Week - next week. October 27-
31: If you would like to find out more
about VISTA's accomplishments a n d
failures, its hopes and aims, and if
_you might be interested in becoming
a volunteer, stop in at3529 S.A.B. from
9-5 each day. A short film will be
shown at, 2 and 7 p.m. on Mon.-Thurs.
VISTA Representative will be in the
Fishbowl also all week.
Foreign Affairs Intern Program:
leading to MA in International Af-
fairs. Applications for Dec. 6, 1969
Foreign Service Exam are due Friday,
October 24, 1969. Call IPaceinent Serv-
ices for additional information on el-
gibility.
=X X.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
South and Southwest Asia C I u b
Brown Bag, October 24, 12 Noon, Lane
Hall Commons Room, speaker: Prof.
John Broomfield, Director, Center for
South & Southeast Asian Studies,
"Ask Not What You Can Do For Your
Center, But What Your Center Can
Do For You".
Motorcycle storge
only $5.00' month
FREE PIK-UP
for any storoae
or service work
NICHOLSON
Motorcycle Sales
224 South First
662-3221

Stu den I
By JEFF IVEISBERG
Have you ever wanted to 1
know your potential as a lead-
ei? A new leadership prog'am
introduced to the campus last
semester aims at the develop-
nment of your sensitivity a n d
effectiveness on both a per-
sonal and group level.
"This is not a remodeled
Dale Carnegie program", says
Ned Dougherty, Assistant Di-
rector in the Office of Student I
Organizations who heads the
program. Rather, he says, it 1
resembles a T-group sensitiv- I
ity weekend with the added a
advantage of more defined
goals. For this reason, parti- 1
cipants are expected to become
sensitive as well as active
leaders.

train

Many of the individuals in-
terviewed, who attended last
semester's leadership confer-
ence weekend, readily agree
with Dougherty's description
and many plan to return.
"It was the most valuable
weekend I had last term,"
says Roger Hanky, president
of Alpha Phi Omega. "It tops
anything on campus socially
and beats any seminar."
Sandy Smith, a Girl Scout
troop leader, remarks, "I nov-
er experienced anything so in-
tense. I got a startling view of
myself as a dynamic group
member." Chris Kahan, former
president of Stockwell, said
that her group "just flipped
out."
Tom Clark also assistant
director of the student organi-

zations office, says he "regret-
fully" can not return this term,
but he holds a standing $50
bet that no one can describe
the feelings they receive from
thw weekend. He believes that
it is "like trying to describe
the most beautiful or enlight-
ening experiences of your
life."
One characteristic of today's
better leader, is a less-dicta-
tive style, says Dougherty. "We
are concentrating on a more
modern, more humane ap-
proach," s a y s Dougherty of
this year's program.
Dougherty believes that the
real results can not be known
until participants get back on
campus and the results may
not be realized until m a n y
years later.

Using a manual entitled
"The Art of Leadership," de-
veloped by the National Lead-
ership Institute in November,
1968, Dougherty predicts this
style of leadership will "mark
the beginning of a whole new
movement in corporate leader-
ship."
After an introductory group
finger-painting session, groups
rap on "defense mechanisms
to which people in groups re-
sort, the benefits of i n t e r-
group conflict, and leadership
and membership styles in
groups."
The price for the weekend
will be $16. A small price for
increasing the understanding
of your leadership potiential.
And you can fingerpaint at the
same time.

STUDY SHOWS FRICTION WITH ARABS:

0

Soviet power uncertain in Mideast

I

for

leadership

MAR'

i

International Affairs Committee

cordially invites you to a reception
for a group of U.N. 'Delegates
Including:
Ambassador Maxime-Leopold Zollner-Dahomey
Ambassador Simeon Ake-Ivory Coast
Abassador Ismail Saeed Noaman-Southern Yemen
Ambassador Lazar Mojsov-Yugoslavia
Ambassador T. J. Molefhe-Botswana
Ambassador Victor Issraelyan-U.S.S.R.
And representatives of the following countries:

LONDON uP, - The Soviet Un-
ion has become a major power in
the Middle East but has failed to
win wholehearted allegiance from
Arab governments, a report pub-
lished by the Institute for Strate-
gic Studies has revealed.
The report suggested that the;
Soviet Union's Involvement in the
Arab-Israeli conflict has placed
new responsibilities on the Rus-
sians without gaining them a cor-
responding ability to control
events in the region.
But the study by Robert E.
Hunter said, "The Arabs-though
still to Russian minds an a 1i e n
people - are being courted and
influenced, armed and aided in
ways that suggest a long-range
Soviet desire to dominate the
Middle East."
Hunter, an American, is a re-
searcher at the institute and z
former lecturer in international
relations at the London School of
Economics. The institute is an in-
dependent center concerned with
the study of war, arms control and
diplomacy.
"The Middle East has become
an arena of Soviet-American com-
petition that is no longer isolated
from other areas of more vital in-
terest to them both," the report
said. "It is now crucial for them
both to develop a better under-1
standing about one another's in-!
erests and actions in the area.
"Otherwise there will be riskst

-Associated Press

Israeli soldiers guard bombed village

Ceylop
India
Netherlands
Italy
Syria
Turkey
Ethiopia

Cyprus
Poland
Finland
Equador
Brazil
Malta
United Arab Republic

Denmark
Norway
Argentina
Libya
Freland
Spain

of their being drawn into crises
and wars not of their making or
choosing, or even into direct con-
frontation,"
Hunter said the Soviet Union
has replaced at least 80 per cent
of the military equipment Egypt
lost in the six-day war in 1967 -
equipment that would have cost

Sunday, Oct. 26, 1969, 4to 6 P.M., Lawyer's Club, Law Quad

__ __ '

STUDENTS
Find Out What Is Happening on
YOUR Campus!
TUNE IN THE NEW "CAMPUS NEWS"
8:30 A.M.

as much as $2 billion if bought sn
the West. He estimated the num-
ber of Soviet military personnel in
Egypt at 3,000, three times as
many as before the war.
But Hunter said A : a b states
hold ambivalent attitudes toward
the Soviet Union a n d a major,
shift of allegiance in Egypt - the
key to Soviet ambitions - could
not be ruled out; many Arabs, he
said, blame Soviet military meth-
ods introduced to the Egyptian
armed forces for their 1967 de-
feat,
"In general there is little Arab
affection for the patronizing Slavs
of the Soviet Union," the report'
said. "Russian military advisers
in Egypt are said to treat their lo-
cal counterparts with contempt..
They are resented for their spar-
tan attitudes toward training and
they are regarded in Alexandria
and Cairo as niggardly tourists.
"The more the Russians have
become involved, particularly in
Egypt, Syria and Algeria, the less
popular they h a v e become," it
said.
Hunter said the Soviet use of the
Suez Canal, if it-is reopened, may
have important implications to

E ,

Western powers but the present
Soviet naval buildup of 40-60
ships in the Mediterranean pro-
vides little competition for t h e
U.S. 6th Fleet and is outnumbered
by the Italian navy.
The Soviet Union's Middle Eas:
presence "has brought responsi-
bility but not necessarily power
and authority as well." he said.
"The Soviet Union ,nuy be acquir-
ing more intinence w tb individ-
ual Arab states but at, the price
of appearing often to be the dog
'wagged by th- Arai; tail."
The report said the Soviet Un-
ion appeal's for te first time to
be seeking a Middle East policy
that would resolve its pursuit of
opportunities among the Arabs
with a desire to avoid aconfron-
tation with the United States and
a n e e d to satisfy commitments
elsewhere.
Developments in Russian policy
over the next year or so, it said,
"could set the pattern of inter-
state relations in this part of thr
world for many years to come."
Michael P. Church, assistant di-
rector for cultural activities in the
Extension Service, is a m o n g the
speakers scheduled for the Canad-
ian-American Community Con-
ference this weekend at L a k e
Superior State College, S a u I t
Ste. Marie.
His discussion of art activities
in Michigan is scheduled for 8
p.m. Friday,

JET

TO

EUROPE

$189

oil

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Starting October 27

650

4

ROUND TRIPBOEING 707
University Charter's 6th Annual Charter Flight Series
Sponsored by STUDENTS INTERNATIONAL
a non-profit student organization

DON'T FORGET OUR 7 & 11

P.M. NEWS

J

M"

i M a

0
0

non-stop JET
open bar and complete meals
Detroit departures from near by Metro Airport
$50 deposit, final payment in March

ff

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* cancellation privileges until day of departure
* complete range of travel services
Intro-European student charter flight bookings
International Student I.D. cards
Eurail and Britrail Passes
Auto purchases, rentals and leases
Connecting ground and air transportation
Traveler's Checks
Educational tours
Student priced hotel bookings
A London Office to serve you
A wide variety of flights to choose from

man at leisure,
Dmfortably at ease
in the Ban-Lon-

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DETROIT
FLIGHT NO.
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3
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DATE WEEKS
Dec. 22-Jan. 6 Xmas
May 4-June 9 4
May 5-June 25 6
May 15-Aug. 20 12
June 26-Aug. 26 8
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Frame those posters,
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neatly yourself in min-
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It won't cost much, and
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Natural or Gold-finished
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Two packages make a
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