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October 23, 1969 - Image 7

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Thursday, October 23, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page' Seven

THE MICHIGAN DAILYPage' Seven

Gophers may crawl; but don't count them out

.

(Gridde Icii,

By CHRIS TERAS
Any grid {fan worth his weight
in gold football stickers knows
that Minnesota teams are always
big and slow. The Gophers are big
again this year as the offensive
line averages 225, the defensive
front, 221, and the backfields, 203.
Th?y're undoubtedly slow, t o o,
if their 0-4-1 record is any indi-
cation.
Coach Murray Warmath is not
talking too much to anyone these
days, but Otis Dypwick, Sports
Information Director, was willing
"to say a few words for the fans."
"Our biggest trouble," he said,
"is that we are playing so many'
sophomores. It takes time to gain
poise and confidence. They just
haven't learned how to play foot-
ball yet."
"And then some of our seniors
haven't been playing too well,"
Dypwick admitted. "Our younger
boys have been doing almost all
the hitting."
He continued, "Because of our
seniors. we've had to experiment
a lot throughout the season, and
when you're still experimenting in
mid-season, you're in trouble."
Dypwick went on to explain
why the Minnesota defense, which
gave up 17 points to Indiana,
more than 40 to Arizona State,
and over 30 to Ohio U. and Ohio
State, is so inept. "Our No. 1
problem is speed and mobility," he
said.
"We were really hurt by grad-
uation," Dypwick said. "We lost
three first-team All-Big Ten
players and two from the second
team. Our two defensive ends are
gone as well as just about the en-
tire backfield."
"Their (the opposition's passers
and receivers," he continued,
"have just been poison against
us. Our defensive line doesn't have
the aggressiveness of past Minne-
sota lines. The quarterbacks a r e

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
BILL DINNER
getting too much time to throw,
and of course it's putting a lot of
pressure on our secondary."
Even though the Gophers have
had trouble knocking down enemy
missiles, they did exhibit a pass-j
ing attack of thehown in Satur-
day's 34-7 loss to Ohio State.
Quarterback Phil Hagen fin-
ally overcame the effects of pre-
vious injuries to hit 26 passes in
47 tries for 304 yards. His best
receiver was tight end Ray Par-
son, who is 6-5 and weighs 235.
"Murray usually likes to stay on
the ground," Dypwich explained,
"but Ohio State was keying on
our Funning attack all 'day.
"Their pass rush wasn't effec-
tive at all," he continued. "Our of-F

Barry Mayer, who weighs 213
pounds, was bottled up by the
Bucks and totaled only 33 yards
in 14 tries.
One of the more amazing offen-
sive statistics is that Minnesota
ran up a total of 25 first downs
compared to State's 24. The
Gophers' offensive mistakes, how-
ever, were fatal.
"We played well enough to beat
Ohio State," Dypwick moaned,
"but those offensive mistakes were
just too much."
The trouble began against In-
diana as the Hoosiers' winning
touchdown was posted after a
Gopher fumble. The bobbles con-
tinued right into the Buckeye
game. Minnesota lost five fumbles
last week, including an awry
pitchout on the Ohio S t a t e one-
yard line.
"You can't blame all our mis-
takes on the sophomores, though,"
Dpywick stated. "Hagen's a senior
and he's the one who made that
bad pitch. He also threw a ball
away that never should have been
intercepted."
It is not known whether or not
the Gophers are considering play-

After their defeat in World War II. the Italians tried to find out
the reasons for American superiority. Research teams were sent to
American military sectors, medical areas and to newspapers. Their
investigation into the motivating effect of journalism led to the long
rivalry between the Daily sports staff and the football managers, a
contest that will be staged this Sunday.
Anyway, a squib in the Daily ("to play football you need a leather
ball") led them to investigate what they thought was the reason
for American power. "We never thought American superiority would
be the result of genital strength," says Saul DiPonio, head of the
team.
To find the causes of the "strength," they became the managers
of the Michigan football team. However, wise to their intent, and al-
ways ready for a joke, the football coaches have since kept them from
the training and locker rooms. The frustrations of twenty years of
ostracism must be vent in some way, hence the rivalry between man-
agers and sports staff. As for grid picks, have them in by Friday.
This week's picks were made by Otis J. Dypwick (a name that
begs for respelling), Minnesota athletic director. Coach Warmath
said he was "hung up, and couldn't make it."

-Daily-Larry Robbins
George Kemp barrels around left end in last year's game

fensive line was going an11uU ing juniors only.
standing job of keeping them out.
They didn't get to Hagen once."
Minnesota may not have s u c h NCAA ACTION:

effective pass-blocking against
Michigan because offensive tack-
le. Ray Hawes, who Dypwick re-
gards as the team's best offensive
lineman, will not be recovered
from the injury he suffered in the
Ohio State contest.
While the passing game was de-
finitely successful, the rushing
game was both successful and un-
successful against the Buckeyes.
The 225-pound fullback, Jim Car-
ter, gained 103 yards on 23 car-
ries, indaddition to his six-yard
scoring dash.
On the other hand, halfback

Marshall grid

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Rigney to manage Twins;
Giusti traded to Pittsburgh
ly The Associated Press
0 MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL-President Calvin Griffith of the
Minnesota Twins has reached outside the Twins' organization for
the first time to pick a new manager for the American League base-
ball team.
Griffith has also offered a record salary of about $60,000 to Bill
Rigney to succeed Billy Martin as Twins manager. Griffith fired
Martin nine days ago for refusal to follow front office "policy and
guidelines."
"The only thing holding up the signing is that Rigney wants to
make a settlement with the California Angels on his 1970 contract,"
Griffith said.
Since Griffith succeeded his late uncle Clark Griffith as presi-
dent of the franchise in 1956 he has picked men from within the
organization as managers.
They include coaches Cookie Lavegetto and Sam Mele, and Cal
Ermer and Martin, who had managed in the Twins' farm system.
Rigney was named American League Manager of the Year in
1962 for finishing third with a collection of castoffs and youngsters.
9 ST. LOUIS-The St. Louis Cardinals, involved in seven-player
and four-player swaps in the last two weeks, aren't through yet.
The Cards have just traded pitcher Dave Giusti and pinch-hitter
Dave Ricketts to Pittsburgh for handyman Carl Taylor and a minor
league outfielder, Frank Vanzin.
Taylor, 25, hit .368 last season but didn't have enough at-bats
to win the crown.
Giusti, a 30-year-old right-hander, worked only 100 innings last
season, compiling a 3-7 record.
9 YUGOSLAVIA-The United States launched a drive yesterday
for the Winter and Summer Olympic Games in 1976, breaking a long
standing tradition.
Despite IOC tradition that Winter and Summer Games are not
awarded to the same nation, Denver and Los Angeles are optimistic
about their chances.
The United States marks its bicentennial in 1976 and the Ameri-
cans feel that this will greatly assist their efforts to win the bids.
* LOS ANGELES-Roger Penske, who won the Trans-Am Manu-
facturers Sedan Racing Championship with Chevrolet Camaros the
past two seasons, announced yesterday he has signed a three-year
agreement to race American Motors Javelins in the future series.
He told a news conference called by American Motors that the
enthusiasm and talent offered by Javelins brought his decision. -
Penske also said that the Traco firm in Los Angeles will modify
the engines for the racing efforts.
Professionol Stondings

KANSAS CITY (P)-The Na-
tional Collegiate Athletic Asso-
ciation Council placed the football
team of Marshall University, Hun-
tington, W. Va., and the track
team of San Jose State in Cali-
fornia on one year's probation
Wednesday.
Marshall drew the penalty for
15 specifications of recruiting and
financial aid violations.
Arthur J. Bergstrom, NCAA as-
sistant executive director, called
the Marshall case one of the most
serious in council history and said,
"in my opinion it would have been
a very severe penalty if the uni-
versity had not taken the steps it
did."
Dr. Roland H. Nelson Jr., presi-
dent of Marshall was commended
by the council for his cooperation
in the NCAA's investigation.
San Jose was penalized because
two of its athletes participated in
the Orange County Invitational
Track and Field Meet last June 15.

The meet was not certified by the
NCAA extra events committee.
The council reported it was its
feeling San Jose officials should
have kept the two athletes from
participating. Under NCAA policy
the two athletes were not named
The council also privately repri-
manded and censured ten of it
institutions for participating in
uncertified gymnastics meets and
eight more schools for competing
in uncertified track meets. Because
they are private reprimands, the
council would not identify the
schools.
In other actions, the council re-
instated three basketball players to
eligibility effective Dec. 21. They
are Gary Freeman of Oregon State
Bob Hall, College of Idaho, and
Mark Lliteras, Boise State, who al
had played in an alumni game at
Borah, Idaho, last March in viola-
tion of the NCAA's rule against
out-of-season competition.
The three had been ruled in-

team suspended
eligible in August but Oregon Marshall had been suspended by
State appealed for Freeman and the Mid-American Conference las
s the NCAA Council reconsidered the May, and Nelson had submitteda
I case on the basis that Freeman 142-page report which he sai
had been misinformed by a high "confirms for the most part every
school coach on the rule, allegation . . . made against th
L Bergstrom compared the Mars- university's football program.
- hall University case with that of San Jose's indoor and outdoo
s the University of Indiana a few track teams will be ineligible fo
years ago. NCAA competition for the nex
The council's resolution in the year. In addition to the probation
Marshall case said, among other San Jose State's athletic adminis
things, the university's football tration was reprimanded.
staff had arranged for athletes
to receive money, loans and other
benefits, in excess of NCAA regu-
lations. It also said the school had
transported athletes to a junior
college to enroll them and provided
' their educational expenses there. o r u n
Under the resolution, Marshall
l is on probation until Oct. 22, 1970.
t Its football team which has not
won a game in its last 26 games
t is ineligible for post season com-
petition and cannot appear on any al
NCAA television program.

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MICHIGAN at MINNESOTA
MICHIGAN STATE at Iowa
Illinois at OHIO STATE
Northwestern at PURDUE
INDIANA at Wisconsin
WASHINGTON at Oregon
Cornell at YALE
Virginia at NAVY
Wake Forest at NORTH
CAROLINA
UCLA at Stanford
Ohio U. at PENN STATE
Texas Tech at SMU
TEXAS A&M at Baylor
Oklahoma St. at NEBRASKA
Oklahoma at Kansas St.-tie
MISSOURI at Colorado
MISSISSIPPI at Houston
Kentucky at GEORGIA
Pennsylvania at PRINCETON
DAILY LIBELS at Football
Managers

Go 60o
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Dec. 27--Jan. 3
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7 GLORIOUS NIGHTS
CHOICE OF:
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KIM MABLEY--
483-2992

OPEN AGAINST STATE:
Fr'os1i-'We're inmber one?0'

By PHIL HERTZ
"We're planning on some early
revenge" was all that Wolverine
freshman grid coach Louie L e e
had on his mind yesterday after-
noon after a long practice session
in the snow and cold at F e r r y
Field.
Lee was talking about the up-
coming clash between the Michi-'
Bparry busts
knee again
By The Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - R i c k
Barry, last year's top American'
Basketball Association scorer, was
forced to leave the floor in the'
second quarter of the Washington
Caps game against the Carolina
Cougars last night when a carti-
lage in his left knee collapsed.
"If it was going to go, it was
going to go," the Washington
player said. "There was nothing
I could do."
It appeared likely an operation
would be necessary to correct th'e
weak knee, which has given Barry
trouble before.
"Maybe it's just as well it hap-
pened now," Barry said.
"Maybe I can get the thing
straightened out for good."
Barry's knee collapsed with
6:31 remaining in the second
quarter. He had scored two points
on a field goal.

gan and Michigan State freshman!
teams Saturday morning at 10:30
at the Michigan Stadium. The
contest provides an opportunity,
for the Wolverines to salvage'
something out of the bitter rival-
ry after last Saturday's 23-12 de-
bacle, and Lee indicated his squadE
plans to make the most out oft
the chance.l
THE FRESHMAN MENTOR
said, "We've been drilling 1o n g
and hard for this contest, we'rej
looking forward to it, and we7
think we're ready for it." T h e
Michigan State contest is the#
first of two for - the Wolverine'
freshmen, who will also travel to
South Band November 15 for a
contest with the Irish of N o t r e
Dame.
Last year Michigan swept twoj
games with Bowling Green a n d
Toledo; however, this season;
State and Notre Dame were sub-1

stituted in an attempt to upgrade
the quality of the schedule.
THE IRISH and the Spartans
traditionally have two of the
strongest freshmen teams in the
country which prompted one
coach to remark: "If we beat both
of the teams we have the Num-
ber One team. If we split we're
Number Two and if we lose both:
we're still Number Three."
Lee also announced yesterday'
that Tom Coyle and Clint Spear-
man had been elected Monday as
the co-captains for the squad.
Coyle, a six-foot, 224 pound guard
hails from Chicago, while Spear-
man, a 6-3, 206 pound end, is a
product of Hamilton, Ohio.
Meanwhile, the Michigan tick-
et department announced that
there will be no reserve seats for
the contest Saturday. All tickets
will cost one dollar and will go
on sale Saturday morning before
the game.

$4.95
,n Sex Ott-Campus twelve unmarried
college couples (from Rhode Island
College, University of Wisconsin, Uni-
versity of Chicago, Stanford Univer-
sity ,Cornell University, University of
California, University of Rochester,
Reed College, Antioch College, Urn-
versity or Texas, Oberlin College, and
Boston University) tell their ownr
stories -- how they feel about their
parents, their new sexual freedom,
and the broad sociological impact of
their actions. Read about the immi-
nently explosive issue of off-campus
Icohabitation in:
SEX OFF-CAMPUS By Roy Aid
GROSSET & DUNLAP, INC., Dept.
A NATIONAL GENERAL C'MPANY. SOC.26
P.O. Box 152
Kensington Sta., B'klyn, N.Y. 11218
IPlease send me ...copy~ies) ofI
SEXsOFF-CAMPUS at $4.95 ea. My
check or money order for $......I
is enclosed.
Name
Address
LeCyState Zip
amity.

Daily Classifieds Get Results

I
I

2 GET YOUR MAN WITH A
Want Ad

Ila
At
Sa
Lo
Se

N I A
Eastern Division
IVw L Pt
yw York 5 0 1 .001
hiladeihia 3 f ) 101
Iilwaukee ? 0 1.00
atirnore 2 1 .66
etroit Ia 1 .50
incinnati 1 3 .25
oston 0 3 .00
Western Division
tianta 1 .66'
an Diego 1I.50
an Francisco 1 1 .50
os Angeles 2 2 .50
hicago 1 2 .33
hoenix 1 3 .25
eattle 0 4 .00
Yesterday's Results
Los Angeles 116, Cincinnati 109
San Francisco 94, Atlanta 93
Milwaukee at San Diego, inc.
Philadelphia 122, Phoenix 119
Today's Game
San Francisco at New York

t.
0
0
67
0
0
0
67
0
0
00
3
0
00

GS
. , .
3';
r.,
7.'
1

N HIL
Eastern Division
W L T Pt. GF
Bostoni 3 0 1 7 13
Montreal 2 0 3 7 18
Detroit 3 1 0 6 13
New York 2 2 1 5 10
Toronto 1 3 1 3 11
Chicago 0 5 1 1 7
Western Division
St. Louis 3 1 1 8 20
Oakland 3 2 1 7 13
Minnesota 3 ? 0 6 16
Philadelphia 1 1 2 4 8
Pittsburgh 0 2 3 3 11
Los Angeles 1 3 0 2 8
Yesterday's Results
St. Louis 3, Montreal 3, tie
Philadelphia 4, Toronto 3
Chicago 1, New York 1, tie
Boston at Minnesota, inc.
Pittsburgh at Los Angeles, inc.
Thursday's Game
Detroit at Philadelphia
13?O s.

GIVE DETROIT A CHANCE
HELP ELECT RICHARD AUSTIN
as NEXT MAYOR of DETROIT
CANVASSING IN DETROIT:
Saturday, Sunday, October 25, 26
Saturday, Sunday, November 1, 2
CALL : 769-2988 or 764-8696
WORK FOR PEACE IN DETROIT
Sponsored by Young Democrats and Youth for Austin

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