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October 18, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-18

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____ _ ___ __

TONIGHT
BARRY
O'NEILL
Has recently appeared at:
WASHINGTON FOLK FESTIVAL
MARIPOSA FOLK FESTIVAL
CAFE LENA

second i front page

im4c

'trl t ttn

DaIA

NEWS PHONE: 764-4)552
HUSINESS PHONE: 764.0554

1421 Hill St.

Saturday, October 18, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

"One of the few people I really enjoy sitting down
and listening to for hours on end.''-Michael Cooney
SATURDAY-1:30-WORKSHOP
Charles Evers
"The man who made Fayette, Miss., into
the town the South is watching."
Detroit Free Press
The entrance of Charles Evers, brother of murdered Civil Rights
leader Medqar Evers, into a position of power over strong white
opposition is an event that has coptured the attention of the
entire nation. His campaian, actively supported by such national
leaders as George McGovern, Edward Kennedy, and Eugene Mc-
Carthy, marks a significant departure from the old path of
Southern white superiority. This remarkable man will address
Micihqan student this Sunday at
HILL AU D. 2 P.M.
TICKETS $1.25
at UNION, LEAGUE, DIAG and DOOR
STATE * NOW *
Program Information 662-6264
where the heads of all nations meet
SHOWS
Thursday LICE S
at

the
news today
b , The Associated Press and College Press Serice
WELFARE REFORMS proposed by the Nixon administration
are encountering stronger-than-expected Capitol Hill opposition.
"We knew it would be rough up there but not quite this rough,"
said one Department of Health Education and Welfare official. Some
officials are now predicting at least a year's delay in enactment of
a family-assistance plan.
The plan would set a national minimum benefit of $1600 a year
for a family of four and require all able-bodied family heads except
for mothers with children under six years of age to accept a "suitable"
job or training.
Democrats in the House Ways and Means Committee, which is
holding hearings on the proposals, have described family assistance
as a first step toward enslavement of welfare beneficiaries in low-
paying jobs.
OAKLAND UNIVERSITY, an affiliate of Michigan State Uni-
versity, asked the MSU Board of Trustees for its independence
yesterday.
Oakland, a school of nearly 6,000 located in Rochester, has been
governed by MSU since it was opened 10 years ago.
During that time, the MSU board has "extended almost complete
autonomy" to Oakland officials. Oakland administrators now believe
that they are ready to operate on their own.
The trustees named a committee to study the request and reportj
back to the board within 30-60 days.
A GULF OIL CORP. SUBSIDIARY was seized 'nd national-
ized yesterday by the month-old Bolivian military government.
Bolivia Gulf Oil Co. offices and fields near Santa Cruz were oc-
cupied by the army along with the main office in La Paz, the
capital.
Gulf Oil bgan operations in Bolivia in 1955 and has reported in-
vestments of $140 million.
The move by the Bolivian government came as a complete
surprise, said a Gulf spoeksman in La Paz. "The police walked directly
into the office and there was nothing we could do but leave," he said.
Leftist groups have long demanded nationalization of foreign
industries, but the official position has leaned towards demanding
larger royalties.
A Gulf offer of 50 percent control of the enterprise was turned
down by the Bolivian government.
THE REV. JAMES E. GROPPI was ordered jailed for a six-
month terniyesterday.
In a hearing that lasted ten minutes. Judge F. Ryan Duffy ruled
that Groppi had violated the provisions of his probation when he sat-
in at the Wisconsin State Assembly on Sept. 29.
Groppi was originally sentenced to six months in the Milwaukee
House of Correction after being convicted of resisting arrest during a
1968 open housing march in that city.-
Groppi's lawyers plan to appeal the ruling, contending that Grop-
pi was not convicted of any crime in connection with the legislature
sit-tn.
RUSSIA'S TRIPLE SOYEZ mission failed in a linkup attempt
Wednesday but American observers still believe that the Russians
are close to developing the world's first space station.
The U.S. experts feel most goals of the Soyuz 6-7-8 flight were
achieved and that within a few months Russian cosmonauts will
begin assemblying an orbiting station.
Soyez 7 and 8 maneuvered within 500 yards of each other, with
Soyez 6 close enough to watch. Experts believe the linkup failure was
probably due to a minor technicality since U.S. efforts have shown
that docking is relatively simple.
Current speculation is that the Soviets are developing an orbiting -
space station. U.S. plans call for such a station in 1972.
The United States had planned to orbit its first fledgling space
station, a three-man craft, this year. But budget cutbacks have de-,
layed the launching until 1972.
Soyez 6 returned to earth Thursday followed by Soyez 7 yester-
day. Soyez 8 is expected to return today.

Nixon predicts inflation slowdown

WARNS OF 'SLOWING PAINS'

-Associated Press
PRESIDENT NIXON ADDRESSED the nation by radio yesterday to express confidence that spiral-
ing prices will be stabilized. He also urged state and local governments to refrain from unnecessary
expenditures.
Departm11nent of Labor report
siows I)lack employment down

By The Associated Press
President Nixon yesterday
said the nation is "on the road
to recovery from the disease
of runaway prices," but cau-
tioned that the effort to cool
off the economy is bound to
produce "slowing pains."
In a live radio broadcast, Nixon
said he is confident the adminis-
tration's anti-inflation policies are
"beginning to take hold."
"You can make your plans on
the basis that price rises ae going
to be slowing down," he said.
However, some businesses will
ineitably suffer from sluggish
sales in the deliberate cooling off
of the economy, he warned.,
Housewives across the country
responded with mixed skepticism
and hope to Nixon's promise that
price rises would slow down. Most
of them said they will believe it
when they see it.
Nixon promised that the ad-
ministration would view economic
adjustment with compassion and
would keep a close watch on the
unemployment rate.
"There are some who say that a
high rate of unemployment cannot
be avoided," he said. "I do not
agree. In our leveling-off process
we intend to do everything we can
to resist increases in unemploy-
men t."
Nixon continued, "holding down
the government spending and
holding up the tax rate, and mak-
ing it harder for people to get
credit is not the kind of policy
that makes friends." But he said
such measures are necessary and
he appealed to Congress to extend
the surtax.
The President also called on
citizens to urge state and loea]
governments to "cooperate in
postponing spending that can ap-
propriately be delayed."
The President said he has re-
jected at least two potential anti-
inflation courses-wage and price
controls and wage guidelines.
As for his own administration,
he said, "we decided that we were
going to stop talking about higher
prices and that we were going to
s t a r t doing something about
them."
In other news on the nation'
economy yesterday, Secretary of
the Treasury David M. Kennedy
predicted the national output will
go into a moderate decline that
will "continue for some time" In
1970.
He contended his policies are
"based on total realism" and that
"instead of relying on our jaw-
bone we have put some backbone
in government's determination to
hold the line for the consumer."
Although he declined to call the
prospective drop a business reces-
sion, Kennedy said a considerable
slowdown in the rate of real
growth can be expected the rest
of this year, although inflation
apairently will continue to push
up the dollar value of output.
In a speech to the Business
Council, Kennedy also warned
against a premature easing of the
anti-inflation brakes despite cur-
rent evidences of a slowdown. The
council was meeting in closed ses-
sion in Hot Springs, Va.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University o
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.

9 P M.
Friday
and
Saturday
at
1, 3, 5,
7, 9 P.M.
AND
II P.M.
Soon
"EASY
RIDER"

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WASHINGTON (A' )--- The gov-
ernment reported Friday worse-
ning unemployment among Ne-
groes in big city slums, despite the
Nixon administration's job train-
ing efforts, while the jobless rate
for poor whites was improving.
The situation was worst among
Negro ten-agers, whose jobless rate
rose to nearly 30 per cent in the
poorest neighborhoods of the na-

tion's 10 largest cities, the Labor
Department said.
"The jobless rate for white
workers in poverty neighborhoods
fell from 5.2 to 4.4 per cent over
the year. Most of this improve-
ment was due to sharp drop in
joblessness among adult women,"
said the report by the Bureau of
"For black workers, on the i ther
hand, the rate of unemployment

Chemnical warfare
testing to resume

r

-" "AUCE'S RESTAURANT', ARLO GUTHRIE
PATQUNN-JAMES BRODERICK Pil SfER IEE Y
U0" OuTLAW .T~fA NA i :!-0 A' [ I Th YiA0A tN j,
. VENABLE HERNDON ARTHUR PENN
IHILLARD ELKINS,-iot MANDUKE .-,ARTHUR PENN
COLOR by DeLuxe AVML6"ON N S " Unied
UNDER 18? BETTER BRING Artists
A PARENT'

TICKETS NOW ON SALE !

Nome

I WORLD PREMIERE MON.,NOV.3-SAT., NOV.8

WNW

GUILD
OCTOBER 18-19
FALSTAFF
(Chimes at Midnight)
dir. ORSON WELLES (1967)
* Director Welles teamed
with Actor Welles in this
Wel I es take-off from
Shakespeare
* "After the 9:00 show,
Mars will invade the
earth"
7 & 9 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 AUDITORIUM

WASHINGTON (/P'-The Army
will resume open air testing of
chemical warfare agents at Edge-
wood Arsenal, Md., announced
Army Secretary Stanley R. Resor
yesterday.
The open air tests were halteda
last July 16 amid rising concern.
over the Army's handling of pois-
onous chemical munitions.
At that time, a committee of
civilian scientific experts, headed
by Dr. Ivan Loveridge Bennett,
vice president of New York Uni-
versity, was appointed to review
procedure in the testing at Edge-
wood.
The same committee also in-
vestigated the training procedures
at Ft. McClellan where special
troops learn how to detect, de-
contaminate and dispose of chem-
ical agents.
The report concluded open air
testing could be continued at
Edgewood. "In the 20-year his-

tory of the testing program there
has never been an instance of ex-
posure of personnel to an extent'
that requires specific treatment,"
it said.
As for McClellan, the commit-
tee said its safety record is "im-
peccable." The report continues
that medical records for the past
five years show that none of the
more than 10,000 individuals who
have received instruction at the,
chemical center and school was'
involved in any incident requiring
treatment for toxic effects of a
chemical agent.
However, the connittee did
recommend c e r t a i n additional
safety measures such as more in-
tensive use of monitors, limitation
of "munitions dissemination" to
heights below 75 feet, installation
of additional fencing around the
test site and periodic ecological
surveys for the area.

averaged 7.5 per cent in the third'
quarter," up from 6.9 per cent in
the third quarter of last year, it
said.
The Labor Department ,eport
said that when jobless rates of
white and black workers in pover-
ty neighborhoods were averaged
together, the unemployment fig-
ure was 5.7 per cent, a slighit ire-
provement over the 5.9 uer cent!
figure for the July-August-Sep-
tember quarter of 1968.
This compared with %n unem-
ploymuent rate of 3.3 percen ~t ill
other urban neighborhoods of the
10 largest cities the past three
months, and a national jobless rate
of 3.7 per cent for the quarter.
However, unemployment in he
final month of the quarter, Sep-
tember, took the sharpest jump in
nine years from 3.5 to 4 per cent
nationally.
The report showed the jobless
problem in slum neighborhoods!
was severest among both white!
and black teen-agers, aged 16 to
19. F~or white teen-agers, til e i-
port figured a 17.2 per cent joblhss
rate, up from 14.8 per cent in the
third quarter of 1968. For Negroes,
the jobless rate among teen-agors
was 29.3 per cent, an increase
from 25.9 per cent in the 2or-
responding three-month period
last year.
Black women also suffered more
unemployment. "Unlike the rate
for white adult women, the m ate
for black women was up signifi-
cantly over the year," the report
said.
The figures were a decline trom

0 *°
BARBRA O MAR
a STREISAND - SHARIF
0 0 oo o o *
o 4 o Y
Matine Today--$1.50 g
a00000 . r. _ Ur'
TONIGHT-$2.00
SATURDAY at 1 :30 and 8 PM.

Summer Session published Tuesday
6.4 to 4.2 per cent for white women I1through Saturday morning. subsrip-
and a rise from 5.5 to 6.7 per cent tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.
for Negro womlen. __________________

AUDRA
LINDLEY
TNI

JAMESl
WHITMORE

CATHERINE
BURNS

I'_

The Daily DID dare!
A page for Girls
TOMORROW

Read and Use
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IN CONCERT: TUESDAY, OCT. 21
HILL AUD., 8:00 p.m.
DAVE BRUBECK'S

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GRETA GARBO

by EVAN HUNTER

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I ANNA KARENINAI

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