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October 18, 1969 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-18

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAIL'Y'

Saturday, October 18, 1969

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, October 1 8, 1969

Of

-records--
antiphony

and phonemes

7l P1TBURg 1OUSB
STEVE ELLIOT
-HEY! He sings!
-HEY! He writes what he sings!
-HEY! He plays git-tar!
-HE'S from New York! HEY!
TONIGHT, doors open at 8 p.m. Music opens at 9 p.m.

By JOE PEHRSON
Walk into a room sometime.
A rap is already underway and
words dart from here to there-
snatches of a conversation which
build until they finally weave
a train of thought. At this time
you glibly join the conversa-
tion, but are you really into
the process? Do you notice the
building blocks of words that
raise this tower of Babel and
build these ideas? Kenneth Ga-
buro, in Music for Voices and
E~:lectronic Sounds (Nonesuch
1-71199) works with words,
stacking them into thoughts.
combining fragments in a pro-
cess he calls antiphony.
Imagine one person stationed
at, each corner of a room. All
four work together to make a
coherent thought, but none are
permitted to speak in stences.
Each person has two or three
Sords of a sentence which he
repeats, words which combine
with the words of the others in
patterns, and which finally con-
vey an impression. The human
mind is able to grasp ideas and
patterns at a much quicker rate
than permitted by convernional
speech.
Words don't even have to be
used: Syllables, and phonemes,
the smallest units of language,
when presented almost random-
ly are assimilated by the mind
and, in some strange way, sense
is made out of this zap process.
McLuhan was one to recognize
this potential, and saw tech-
nology as one way to exploit the
full -power of the mind: not
only is a thought understood,
but the listener becomes a part
of the thought, completely as-
similated. Gaburo is working
with some of these concepts
musically. He is concerned with
a n t i p h o n y: juxtaposition of
words, thoughts, and sounds.
Imagine the same synthesis
of sounds, the same process in
another language, a musical
language with syntax all its
own. Music may carry the same
ideas as a spoken language; it
may have the same content, but
use: an approach which is less
logical, and at the same time
less contained. Music and at its
ultimate, mixed media, flashes
ideas in many forms. It has no
time to wait for a subject and
verb--subject. verb, and modi-
fiers are stated simultaneously
and an idea results, an idea far
richer in levels of meaning than
any approached by spoken or
written language.
Gaburo, in his series of anti-
phonies-- Pearl - White Mo-
ments, distends and fragments
spoken language. Language joins
lie other media as it evolves
from its traditional form. The

antiphony, the electric bom-
bardment of separate fragments,
exists on several levels. First is
the verbal onslaught, already
mentioned. Second is the musi-
cal bombardment, tones and
electronic fragments stated sep-
arately and simultaneously. The
third antiphony, the most im-
p~ortant for Gaburo, is a com-
bination of the first two.
Gaburo, thinking along the
lines of mixed media, wishes
to convey an idea through a
combination of the arts. Both
languages, the language of
music and the spoken language,
must be speaking the same idea.
Both are built upon one an-
other, and he must choose
sounds which combine, in anti-
phony, to present the same
meaning as the spoken sen-
tences. The electronic and in-
strumental sounds are chosen
to convey the same content and
the same emotions as the poetic
text.
Gaburo even carries his third
antiphony one step further -
the verbal sounds, the poetry,
is sung: both media are com-
bined in a single act, the song
form. Each syllable as it is sung
carries both languages and the
interplay is part of his process
of antiphony. This is perhaps
the most important idea in his
work - - he must choose elec-
tronic sounds and pitches which
contrast or complement the in-
herent sound of language.
A certain vowel sound, or
phoneme, for examlple, has .a
certain color of its own. This is
easily seen in a comparison of
languages. The color of the
English language, for example.
is quite different from that of
French or the Scandinavian lan-
guages. The sounds are dif-
ferent, and the particular
sounds in any one language
may be complemented electro-
nically. This, of course, has very
little to do with the actual
meaning of a language, but it
is one of the first attempts to
coreleate electronic sound and
pitch with the sound fabric of
a spoken language.
Gaburo is both poet and mu-
sician. He avoids classification
and is working against the type
of specialization in the arts
which destroys successful at-
tempts at mixed media. He is
concerned with total effect, em-
phasizing both the separate
qualities of poetic and musical
thought and elements common
to these different arts. He sees
all art as means to the -ame
end-communication, and under-
stands the power implicit in the
combination of different media.

"EXQUISITE DELICIOUS COMEDY!"
--Detroit News
TON IGHT at 8:00 P.M.!

"LIKE CHAMPAGNE BUBBLES!"
Ann Arbor News
MAT. SUN. at 2:30 P,.M.!

Ba(111(4of (Cantada

The National Ballet of Canada las
review will appear in Sunday's Da
Daily Official Bulletini
S.TI'UIDAY, OCTOBER 18
General Notices
WoodrOw Wilson FleUowships: Fit-
culty are reminded that the nom-
ination deadline is October 20. Letters
postmarked Oct. 20 wil be accepted.
They should include field of study,
local address and phone number of
students nominated. Send to Prof. Otto
Gra , Dept. of German, 1079 Frieze.
Senate Assembly: Mlon, Oct. 20,:i 15
p.m., Rackhamn Amphitheater. Agnda:
1. Consideration of minutes of regular
imeeting of Sept. 15 and special meeting
of Sept. 29: 2. Announcements a n d
Comumn nica tions: 3. ROTC - Final re-
port of the Academic Affairs Comm.
PIlacentlen t Servrice
GENERALD IVISION
3?00 iSAH3
Placement interviews at General Dvi-
sion Week of October 27-31. Cali 763-'
1363 for info on whether these organi-
zations are recruiting for your back-.

night opened the University Musical Society's dance series.

The

ground. Make appts. before 4 p.m, day
preceding interview,
VISTA, all week.
Rike's.
John Hanocck Mutual Life Insurance
Co.
Aetna Life and Casualtyv
Connecticut Mutual.
Continental Oil.
Lincoln National Corp.
Genova Products.
Prudential Insurance Co.
Dayton's.
Sloan Echool of Managemenm, MIT.
NTONAL (3 N 'RALCOiPORATION
OXEASTERNTHEATRES - '
FOX VLLaE
375 No. MAPLE PD..769-1300
MON.-FRI.-7:20-9:30
SAT. and SUN.--l :00-3:05-
5:10-7:20-9:30

U. of Calif. Irvine, School of Admin.
Ohio State Univ. College of Admin.
University of Rochester. College of
Bus. Ad.
Yale University Law School.
.
z
3020 Woshtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
NOW SHOWING
SHOW TIMES
Wednesdav--1-3-5-7-9
Thurs., Fri, Mon., Tues-7-9
Saturdav & Sunday- -5-7-9
CHAR LTON JESSICA
HESTON WALTER
A AL ER SE AR s
COLOR'TIF, United Artists

OCTOBER 14-26

ITAMMY GRIMES I

BRNBEDFOR]

NOEL COWARD'S
'Uy

DIAL 8-6416
Held Over Again)

"It's the best
picture about
young people
I have seen!"
-Joh.Tu ..cs AOC-V

UNDERGROUND AT THE
F!;WTH roruM/
flicks .& jpani
This Friday and Saturday, Oct. 17 and 18-11:00 P.M.
Not continuous with "Alexander" -- separate admission
"BLACK ZERO"
An underground feature in color which
demonstrates that split-screen dual-pro-
jection tan be used more creatively than in
"Chelsea Girls"
POETRY: LEONARD COHEN
MUSIC: VELVET UNDERGROUND
"A masterpiece! The finest experimental
film in two generations!" - Boston Avatar
"This Ist Prize winner is without question
a sexual art"'--- Vancouver Sun
"Filled with indescribeable terrors and beau-
ties" - London Free Press
.ALSO.
LIVE ON THE big STAGE
Rock and Blues Band

FRIDAY at 7 and 9 P.M.
SATURDAY and SUNDAY at 1, 3, 5,

7, 9 P.M.

WSISMMR

With
William Glover
Suzanne Grossmann
Directed by Stephen Porter

14'* 964cvzac

7

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"The freshest, funniest picture so for this
year!"
-NBC Monitor
"Funny, beautifully acted, extremely point-
ed in its espousal of life and fun!"
-N.Y. Post
"The film is a very now one in style and
technique and in theme. It is about a guy
who cops out on the Establishment and on
the affluent society, deciding that there's
more to living than work and the acquisition
of money. A delicious happy comedy."
--Judith Crist
"A funny picture. Impudent and wise."
-N.Y. Times
"Probably one of the most immoral, most
subversive and most hilarious movies you
will see this year."
-Morning Telegraph

I

* * BONUS FEATURE *

*

BLOOD, SWEAT
and TEARS
THURSDAY,GOCT. 30, 8:30 P.M.
ALL EVENTS BUILDING

Laura Nyro
Richie Havens
Sweetwater
SATURDAY, NOV. 1,8:30 P.M.
ALL EVENTS BUILDING

"Perhaps the nost beautiful movie in history."-
Brendan Gill, The New Yorker. "Exquisite is only the
first word that surges in my mind as an appropriate
description of this exceptional film. Its color is abso-
lutely gorgeous. The use of music and, equally elo-
quent, of silences and sounds is be)ond verbal descrip-
tion. The performances are perfect- that is the.only
word."-Bosley Crowther, New York Times." May well
he the most beautiful film ever made."- Newsweek.
]EIira
MadiEa
sometimnes truth is mnore exciting
Written and directed by Bo Widerherg. With Thommy Berggren and Pia Degermark,
Winner, Best Actress. 1967 Cannes Festival. A Bo Widerberg-Europa Film Produdt%
FEATURE TIMES ,
Saturday and Sunday
"ALEXANDER"-2:30
"ELVIRA MADIGAN"-4:00
"ALEXANDER"-5:30

PRESENTED BY
HOMECOMING '69

TICKET PRICES
$4.00, $3.00

I

TICKET PRICES
$5.00, $4.00, $3.00

i

T I - ..MI

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