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October 07, 1969 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-07

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Page Ter,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, October 7, 1969

Page Ten~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, October 7, 1969

NO IIMMEDIATE ACTION:

Policy

Deans to see students r esi
arrested in LSA sit-in Dost

cf _nconsidering
ort:-r nt danger
the t ar,,-u rent off

point out that society has always
limited freedom of choice where
two institutions (both desired) had
incompatible goals. Thus, as men-
"1 ae? tioned already, we have various
a clear and conflicts of interest rules which
The answers to prevent people from being mem-
the dangers of bers of two organizations at the

(Conutnued from Pg1 i
had been significant disagreement
over the statement.
Associate Dean James Robertson
of the Residential College said he
had already met with the 11 RC
students involved "to tell them
we intended no formal disciplinary
U' fcult
to support
moratontm
PP I
(Continued frontPa : 1i
One professor explained that al-
though he supported an inquiry
into the effects of the war, he
felt a Senate resolution would
ally the faculty with the National
Moratorium Committee.
Prof. Claude A. Eggertsen of
he Art Education School. who
drew up the original support reso-
lution, replied that the fact the
University planned to hold special
programs on the nationally ap-
proved day did not mean hat it
was supportng everything put
forth by the National Moratoriumn
group. He also said. "It's pure
hypocrisy to sit here and say
we're not in politics."
The final resolution included
the basic idea o1 the Medical
School proposal in addition to an
amended version! ol the rsolutim
by Prof. Roer L1 1(1 Ofl the School
of Social wor'
WE'VE
-DROPPED AND ADDED
-PRE CLASSIFIED
-REGISTERED
-LOST OUR I.D. CARDS
-DECLARED MAJORS
-TAKEN INCOMPLETES
-FLUNKED CLASSES
-LIVED IN DORMS
-LIVED IN APARTMENTSI
-BEEN ON PRO
-BEEN TO HEALTH
SERVICE
-HAD PSYCHOLOGICAL
COUNSELING
-BORROWED MONEY
all within the last year.
If you've aot a problem or wont
to Cut some red tape . Come
and See Us at the
STUDENT
COUNSELING
1 FFi0E
1018 Angell Hall

action." But Robertson admitted
that his interpretation of the pol-
icy would not necessarily be fol-
lowed by the other deans.
Literary college Dean William
Hays said he plans to consult with
other LSA administrators, includ-
ing members of the Administrative
Board, concerning further action.
"We certainly aren't instituting
proceedings or anything like that,'
he said.
Dean Gordon Van Wylen of the
engineering c o11e g e described
plans for informal conferences
with the six engineering students
involve as well as discussions
with faculty members. Van Wylen
said he hoped that no further ac-
tion would have to be taken after
the conferences.
Van Wylen denied that there
had been significant disagreement
over drafting the statement, but
said there was "some difference
over what should be stressed."
Dean Stephen Spurr of the grad-
uate school said any consultations
or disciplinary action taken
against the three students in his
school who were involved in the
sit-in would be handled by the
individual departments.

LANSING AP)

Faced with the

a "Prussian" tprofessional army are
twolold: the Defense Department
already constitutes a major men-
ace to our democratic values, and
there are sufficient alternatives to
the costly expansion of the mili-
tary academies to suggest that
; , a is little merit in the argu-
n it i that severance of ROTC will
lead to a professional type of army.

same time..
Conclusion
The hour for reversing a danger-
ous trend is getting late. The pub-
lic, through their grass roots tax
payers' revolts and its pressures
on Congress to move from a hawk-
ish to a dovish position, is expres-
sing their will.
Each of us 4s private citizens

prospect of being dumped by the
State Board of Edtucation, I r a
Polley yesterday resigne as sup-
erintendent of public instuction
and accused the board 01 not do-
ing the job it was designed br.
Polley's ouster had been sou!ht
by at least tour mbihers of the
eight-member board.
The constitutional mandate to
the Board is that it shall exercise
*lead""rhi and n ""ital suprvis-
ion over all public education.
That, lie said, the Board has not
done.
Board critics maintain, however,
that personality conflicts and lack
of specific direction in the Con-
stitution have at least occasion-
ally stymined the eight-mnmber
board.
"The Board works hard." said
one source close to Michigan edu-
cation. "But when you go to a
meeting you get the feeling they
think they are running thi state's
education system. Then you find
out their influence extends only
to the meeting room door."'

FREAKS,

FRATS, ETC.

1} Ned to Maintain an Army can express our views. The ques-
o .the Defense of Cherished , tion arises as to what role, if any, ,
vme.s ,the universities will play in seek-
1 iEe are those who feel that ing to maintain the democratic
tha atack on the ROTC is a ques- value priorities.
tionig~ of the legitimacy of the The ROTC issue provides the
A:'my iand the right to bear arms university with an ideal platform
in ei of cherished values, to speak out-as a university--on_
This is not the position taken the major problem of our time-
herein do we concentrate our country's
Our recommendations to abolish resources on expanded military
ROTC do not in any way weaken expenditures or on solving the so-
the idea that people should have problems of our society.
a rieht to take arms in defense of --Eugene Litwak

i

Let the 1970 Michiganensian
represent the whole University

ihei' \values ... Our demand that
the covernment change its policy
is directly related to the demand
that the Defense Department go
bak to its original job -defending
the value priorities of the people
rather than seeking to alter these
priorities or taking over the func-
tions of other institutions.
C. Freedom of Students to
Choose ROTC.
The, e are those who argue that
ve xni'ht be abridging the free-
doni of choice of students by
ti owing out ROTC. We would

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