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October 07, 1969 - Image 9

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Tuesday, October 7, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Tuesda -y, Octob leme r I~l1 7,111i 19 9 H M C IG N D A L P g N n

Broken

spirit

hurts

7M'

offense

Don Moorhead really knows
what he's talking about.
After Michigan's 45-7 triumph
over Washington last week the
junior quarterback pointed out
the significance of psychology
in football.
"Psychology was a great fac-
tor in our game against Wash-
ington. In the first half we were
able to build up a momentum
that carried over into the second
half. The reverse happened to
Washington. It hurt their team
morale."
Little did he know how the
same psychology would influ-
ence the Wolverine's perform-
ance against Missouri Satur-
day. Only working against them
this time.
After the first quarter, in
which Michigan outplayed the
Tigers, the men of Missouri
came back in the second quarter

BROADoSIDE
by robin wright

to completely break the Wol-
verine's spirit in a way that
damaged Michigan for the rest
of the game.
In the first period the Wol-
verine offense managed to out
rush the Tigers 72 yards to 20
yards and out pass them 28 to 9,
piling up almost four times as
much yardage. For their ef-
fort Michigan earned seven
first downs to Missouri's one,
which was due to two consecu-

tive offside penalties against
Michigan.
The Wolverines missed leav-
ing the quarter with a 6-0 lead
by an inch when Tim Killian's
field goal attempt hit the goal
post and bounced off.
But the catastrophic second
quarter killed any hopes of
carrying on the momentum
built up earlier. Not only
couldn't the Michigan offense
complete a pass, but they ran

-Daily-Sara Krulwich
The Wolverines open a hole for Glenn Doughty (22)

THE METS??????

up a negative 16 yards and
fumbled three times for Mis-
souri take overs.
As Coach Bo Schembechler
so appropriately exclaimed,
"that second quarter was a
nightmare. I wouldn't have be-
lieved it unless I was there. You
.just can't turn the ball over
that many times and expect to
win."
Schembechler explained how
the continuous series of errors
effected the team. "We started
out real well. It was our game
for the first quarter.
"But Moorhead opened t h e
second period with a fumble,
Glen Doughty then fumbled the
next time we got the ball, Mis-
souri intercepted a pass a n d
finally (Bill) Taylor fumbled at
the end of the period.
"It was one miseake a f t e r
another. It seemed like every-
thing backfired. We just gave
too much away in the second
quarter.
"That field goal and one of
the touchdowns were gifts.
They also succeeded in break-
ing our draw play, which was
tough on us.
"I thought we would be able
to' come back and win it in the
second half when we got our
last two touchdowns, but we
didn't. It's always tough when
you're down 17 points and have
only a little time left. If we had
played a mistake-proof game it
would have been snug."
Schembechler's feelings about
the offense's performance show-
ed up in the selection of mem-
bers for this week's Victor's
Club. Against Vanderbilt there
were 13 chosen, and just one
less when the Wolverines beat
Washington. But this week only
UIf M

two, tackle Jack Harpring and
back John Gabler earned status
in the club. Harpring also won
the offensive championship
award of the week.
In contrast, Schembechler
felt "the defensive unit should
not be faulted at all. They made
a real good performance. Des-
pite giving up 40 points, it was
the best defensive show they've
made."
Looking forward to Michi-
gan's Big Ten opener against
Purdue this week Schembechler
commented, "the defense will
face a greater test than they
did against Missouri. Quarter-
back Mike Phipps is a brilliant
guy, and all the skilled posi-
tions are well manned.
The new coach will be look-
ing for a revenge win against
the Boilermakers for a g a m e
they swiped from him when he
was chief mentor of the Miami
Redskins. After the defeat in
1965 he brought his team back
to take six wins in a row and
the Mid American Conference
Championship. He'll be looking
for a similar comeback Satur-
day.
"We're not going to change
personnel or try anything new
besides slight variations of our
basic pattern," Schembechler
commented about preparing for
the match.
"But I'm a strong believer
that what a team does on Satur-
day is the same as they've done
all week, so if anyone drops the
ball during practice this week
they better run 'to the nearest
portal of the stadium."
He then summed it up, "prac-
tices will definitely be more
exuberant this week."
SKI CLUB
1A O M T % r

Mets, 10:
NewYork gfoes wil
as dream comes true
NEW YORK R-The incredible New York Mets, baseball's
rag tag clowns for seven long years, made it all the way to
the top yesterday by winning the National League pennant
with a third straight playoff victory 7-4 over the stunned
Atlanta Braves.
Wayne 'Red" Garrett, an Atlanta farmhand drafted by
the Mets for $25,000 last December, delivered the killing blow,
a two-run homer in the fifth inning that put the Mets ahead
for keeps. Garrett had hit only one homer all year and batted
but .218.
Nolan Ryan, the fireballing 22-year-old right-hander who
commuted between the Mets and a Texas army camp all
summer, bailed out starter
Gary Gentry with a brilliant'
effort in the last seven in-
nings. ' daily
A roaring standing room crowd
of 53,193 at Shea Stadium chant-
ed "We want more" in the Mets'
in the ninth as Ryan closed NIGHT EDITOR:
strong. ERIC SIEGEL
When Garrett threw to Ed
Kranepool to retire Tony Gonza-
lez for the final clinching out, the frantic fans out of the dugout
thousands of youngsters swarmed as torn paper spewed down from
onto the field, fire crackers thun- the stands and a mini "Woodstock
dered in the stands and the bases Pop Festival" set in on the infield.
quickly disappeared. Instant ban- The club that never had finish-
ners proclaiming "Mets' Champs" ed better than ninth and then only
sprouted out of nowhere. reached that pinnacle twice in
S e v e r a l hundred youngsters seven previous years, had won it
clustered in front of the Met dug- all in the National League after
out shouting "We're No. 1" anges- making up 9 games on the Chi-
turing with their fists. in the air. cago Cubs to win the East Divi-
A special corps of policemen kept sion and then routing the West-

rioles

go

to

series!

Orioles smash Twins;
climax playoff sweep

MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL (AP
Paul Blair and Don Buford crack-
ed nine hits between them and the
rampaging Baltimore O r i o 1 e s'
charged into the 1969 World Series
yesterday, completing a three-
game American League playoff
sweep with an 11-2 romp over the
Minnesota Twins.
The Orioles will open the series,
at home Saturday, facing the New
York Mets, who also swept their
National League playoff against
the Atlanta Braves.
Monday's clincher was a com-'
plete opposite from the first hvo
games of the series --both p~itcher's
duels which stretched into extra
innings.
The Orioles rattled 18 hits
around Metropolitan Stadium,
eight of them for extra bases.!
Blair, who had five hits, drove
in five runs, two of them on a
407-foot home run in the eighth
inning and Ellie Hendricks drove'
in three runs with a pair of dou-!
bles.

Seven Minnesota pitchers took
the pounding while Baltimore's
Jim Palmer rode the heavy hit-
ting to an easy victory. He scat-
tered 10 hits-two of them run-
scoring singles by Rich Reese,
But after Reese drove in a Min-
nesota run in the bottom of the
first, the Orioles struck back in'

the second.

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bWII1LEKLAND TIP~
MEETING
INFORMATION ABOUT PASSPORTS,
LUGGAGE, DEPARTURE PROCEDURE
TUESDAY, OCT. 7th
Room 35, Michigan Union, 7:00 P.M.
SOME SPACES STILL AVAILABLE
. -- - -- - -- - - - -

Hailing the vici
ern champion Braves in three
straight.
Manager Gil Hodges' amazing
Mets now go on into the World
Series starting Saturday afternoon
in the home park of the American
League champions.
But even a World Series victory
will have a hard time topping this
celebration. Some thought it was'

-Associated Press
tor, Mets' style
ANN ARBOR
RESSTA NCE
BAKE SALE
Wed. and Thurs.
HELP US OUT
Bring Baked Goods to
our table on the DIAG
after 10 A.M. both
days.

-I
-

Gridde I
There are twenty interesting
one of them may be classed as a "m
This game will take place Fr
50,000 screaming fans at historic
Libels actually ranked number one
uac muggers (mothers).
According to former Libel co
Boy would lose five pounds sweati
Libels took over first place in the ra
To start off the week, helping
ions is Bob Schembechler. We ar
Bo has done fairly well with a 4
case the real value of his choices.
Gather your picks together a
by noon Friday for a chance at a;
1. Purdue at MICHIGAN
2. Michigan State at 0I110
STATE
3. Minnesota at INDIANA
4. IOWA at Wisconsin
5. NORTHWESTERN at Illinois
6. COLORADO at Iowa State
7. GEORGIA at Mississippi
8. Kansas State at KANSAS
9. Clemson at AUBURN
10. AIR FORCE at North Caro-
lina
11. Kentucky at VIRGINIA
TECH

even wilder than the night they
clinched the East title on Sept. 24.
P ig *Victory was sweet for the fans
who were deprived of their two
National League franchises when
the Dodgers and Giants moved
games on tap this week but only West to California in 1958. It took
ajor" struggle, eight long years but the bubbling
iday evening at 5 p.m. with some champagne was worth the effort.
Wines field. The Michigan Daily The Mets, derided as Punch and
on the AP poll will demolish the Judy hitters who had to get by on
their fine pitching, wound up with
ach Clarence "Biggy" Copi, "Fat a .327 club batting average and
ng if he found out that the Daily scored 27 runs on 37 hits in the
tings." three games. On the other hand
you out in your important decis- their three starting pitchers, Tom
e furnishing his selections below. Seaver, Jerry Koosnman and Gary
0-20 record, but only you should Gentry all were roughed up, while
the Braves scored 15 runs.
nd bring themn over to the DaTily

r,
,
.S
i
'',
l

STA-PREST
:LABE$
Cool and con-

lucious Cottage Inn pizza.
12. Nebraska at MISSOURI
13. Navy at PITTSBURGH
14. North Carolina State at
SOUTH CAROLINA
15. TEXAS vs. Oklahoma at
Dallas
16. West Virginia at PENN
STATE
17. Stanford at USC, night
18. Georgia Tech at TENNESSEEj
19. Texas A&M at TEXAS TECH
20. DAILY LIBELS vs. uac
muggers.

FALL RENTALS
2 bedroom
apartment
2-3-4 Man
McKinley Associates
663-6448

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SUSTITUTE TEACHER
WANTEDnl
QUALIFICATIONS:
Education students with 75 hours credit
TEACHING AREAS:
All secondary areas, All elementary grades
RATE OF PAY:
$25.00 per day
LENGTH OF DAY:
Secondary: 7:45 A.M.-3:15 P.M.
Elementary: 8:45 A.M.-3:15 P.M.

Open
Tuesday 8:

Hearing

o P.M.

October 7

Auditorium

A,

Angell Hall

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