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October 07, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-07

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Underground paper defies EreUgation

By JIM NEUBACHER
YPSILANTI-The first issue of a
student-oriented underground news-
paper was distributed here on the
campus of Eastern Michigan Univer-
sity yesterday in violation of EMU
regulations.
"The Second Coming," which is pub-
lished by the Ypsilanti Inter-Media
Corporation, was sold for 25 cents per
copy yesterday around the campus.
The action directly violated an EMU
regulation forbidding ". . . promotion
of an enterprise or sale of a product"
without authorization from the Vice
President for Business and Finance,
Louis Profit.

Profit, has refused to issue such
authorization to the staff of "The
Second Coming."
The paper, published by EMU stu-
dents and faculty members, was ap-
parently well-received yesterday. More
than 600 issues were sold in the first
hour. "mostly to curious types," said
one vendor.
Sources connected with the staff
reported last night that no arrests
or harrassment of vendors had oc-
curred.
The administration has yet to make
a formal decision on the paper or on
the vendors defiance of the EMU rules
regarding distribution.

__ ...
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Dean of Students Thomas Aceto,
considered one of EMU's more liberal
administrators, said frankly yesterday
he felt it was "a good first issue."
Violation of the distribution rules
was a reaction to inability to negotiate
with the administration, said Frank
Michels, EMU student, editor of the
paper.
In an editorial in yesterday's issue,
Michels called administration efforts
to stop distribution "paranoid attempts
to prevent the 'Second Coming' from
reaching the students."
"The Second Coming" is an out-
growth of last years efforts to estab-
lish an underground press at Eastern.

"The Obsidian," begun last February
in the wake of student demonstrations
on the campus, was subjected to heavy
censorship by the administration, and
was eventually confiscated by EMU
officials.
"The Obsidian" attempted two more
issues after the confiscation then died
a quiet death. Michels, one of the staff
members of this first paper, said he
began to plan for "The Second Com-
ing" over the summer.
"We had planned to avoid going
through channels after seeing what
happened to the Obsidian," said Mich-
els. However, he said he stayed in
close informal contact with the Vice-

President for Student Affairs Robert
Zumwinkle and Aceto.
Rumors of the new paper reached
the high administrators said Michels,
and, in turn, rumors of impending ar-
rest and confiscation came back.
"We decided to check out these
rumors," said one of the female staff
members. "We met "with Profit to ask
if this was his position, and he said it
was. He claimed he was the only one
with authority to authorize the pub-
lication.
"I asked him then if he would give
us permission to distribute the paper
and he said no."

PART I-ENDS TODAY

FOUtlt:N F1'I M 1)[HE tYEAR!'

ACAD.MY

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by The As'sociated Pre ss and Collegte Press Sert ice

I'tlitogan

Tuesday, October 7, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

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1-0

HUGH SCOTT, Senate Republican leader, predicted a
breakthrough may come in Vietnam in the next few months.
Scott, speaking to newsmen, said he had indications a turning
point in the war may come for either diplomatic or military reasons.
Meanwhile, a bipartisan group of House members voiced ap-
proval of a resolution supporting withdrawal of U.S. troops from
Vietnam "at the earliest possible date."
Other members of Congress urged support for the planned
Oct. 15 demonstration against continued U.S. participation in the
fighting.
THE SUPREME COURT opened its 1969-70 session with a
new chief justice ,a sedate ceremony, and a vacant seat.
The new chief, Warren E. Burger, presided over an uneventful
28-minute session. Its serenity contrasted sharply with the still un-
settled dispute in the Senate over the nomination of Judge Clement
F. Haynsworth Jr. to succeed Abe Fortas on the high court.
In the Senate, the nomination of the federal circuit court judge
rests uneasily before the Judiciary Committee, the target of a con-
certed drive opposing Haynsworth by labor and civil rights groups.
REV. JAMES E. GROPPI's bid for immediate release from
jail was denied by a federal judge.
Judge James Doyle said the militant Roman Catholic priest's
petition for release did not indicate that he had exhausted remedies
available in the Wisconsin state courts.
Groppi was arrested last week on a disorderly conduct charge
after leading three days of welfare protests on the Wisconsin state
capital which culminated in an 11-hour takeover of the Assembly
chambers.
He was later cited by the state assembly for contempt under a
121-year-old state law and ordered jailed without bond.
SOUTII VIETNAMESE PRESIDENT Nguyen Van Thieu
said the Vietnamese people "are determined to replace the bulk
of the U.S. fighting units in 1970."
Thieu added, however, that all American troops cannot be
withdrawn as long as North Vietnamese forces remain in South
Vietnam.
In a major policy speech to a joint session of South Vietnam's
National Assembly and Senate, Thieu also said he thought that
allied forces should remain in Vietnam as long as aggression threat-
ens Southeast Asia.
Thieu emphasized he remains willing to negotiate an "accept-
able" peace while determined to avoid a coalition government or sur-
render to the Communists.

over firing

black

professor

UCLAeOrd

LOS ANGELES (t?)A young Communist, focal point of a
bitter fight between University of California regents and fac-
ulty, lectured on philosophy yesterday to a crowd of 1,900.
Students gave her a standing ovation and demanded credit
for her course.
Angela Davis, 25, spoke on "Recurring Philosophical
Themes in Black Literature" at the University of California
at Los Angeles.
One hundred and 69 students had registered for t h e
course. It was moved from a 300-seat hall to 1,900-seat Royce
Hall.
The regents fired Miss Davis last month after she said
she belonged to a Communist

of

Cameroon presidient presents m(ifesto
Cameroon President Ahmadou Ahidjo, speaking for the heads of
state of all black African nations, presents an "African Manifesto"
yesterday to the United Nations. The Manifesto demanded con-
demnation "of all racialism," especially in the African nations.

(ONFLICTING PROTESTS
SDS approaches internalcrisis

club.
A committee of UCLA's Aca-
demic Senate demanded that she
be permitted to teach, and that
the course be for credit.
The regents ruled last Friday
that she could teach - but not for
credit.
Earlier, a group of 20 black pro-
fessors had threatened to with-
hold grades from their students
over Miss Davis's dismissal.
University Chancellor Charles
Young said Miss Davis would be
allowed to remain on the payroll
while she appealed her case.
Two firebombswere tossed be-
fore dawn into the five-by-eight
foot structure at the entrance to
the campus, causing $2,250 dam-
age.
"People are upset and concerned
over the Angela Davis affair," said
Charles McClura, dean of student
activities. But he said he didn't
know if the firebombs stemmed
from her case.
"She'd better teach or s o m e-
thing's going to happen," s a i d
John Parker, editor of the school
newspaper, t h e Daily Bruin.
Miss Davis and her supporters
contend the was fired primarily
for racial reasons and not a 1940
regents' ruling prohibiting Com-
munists from teaching at state
universities.
The faculty move, Singleton
said, was meant "to toss the ball
back into the hands of the re-
gents .
Young told newsmen he believ-
ed one reason feeling ran high on
the campus was fear among stu-
dents and faculty members that
the ouster of Miss Davis might be
a prelude to the firing of other
faculty members.

of blacks ini
law school
The Black Law Student's Al-
liance has started a campaign to
increase admission of black law
students to the University.
The alliance will leaflet at the
University, Wayne State Univer-
sity, Eastern Michigan University,
Michigan State University and all
black communities in the Wash-
tenaw County area.
The alliance charges the Uni-
versity with reneging on its prom-
ise to hire black faculty members
for this school year. It also claims
the University has not fulfilled its
pledge to increase the black stu-
dent population by 50 this year.
Currently, only 38 of the 1150
students at the University Law
School are black, and there are no
black instructors or administra-
tors, the leaflet notes.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
MIchigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Clas postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Nicigan .10-. Published daily Tues-
day hog Sunday morning Univer-
sity ear Suib-cription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Sunen'r Ssion published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
maON.
---- --- COUPON "------.

t.manuel L. Wolf presents AN ALLIED ARTISTS FILM
A Frank Perry-Alsid Production
- BARBARA HERSHEY. RICHARD THOMAS, BRUCE DAVSO CATH BURNS
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-SIDNEY BECKERMAN JOEL GLICKMAN NFRANK PERRY EASTMAN COLOR
JOHN SIMON 0-, . _,,ALLIED ARTISTS : -
the tneeme song ayeo ty THI; BRASS RNG on TCO RRcS c ;.-

CHICAGO A' -Tuo contend-
ing wings within Students for
a Democratic Society (SDS)
are heading for a confrontation
that could leave the nation's
major radical youth organiza-
tion in shambles.
"Very soon, the only active
people left in SDS will be FBI
agents," said one member who,
like many others, fears the im-
pending showdown could result
in the demise of both factions.
The two factiois "The
Weatherman" and the Revolu-
tionary Youth Movement II
( RYM II-are planning a ser-
ies of competing demonstrations
beginning tomorrow in this city
which has become a radical
local point because of the fed-

eral conspiracy trial of eight
movement leaders.
The trial stems from the
violence accompanying 1a s t
year's Democratic National Con-
vention.
At stake in the showdown is
prestige - something both fac-
tions need if they are to build
a following among nonaligned
radicals on the nation's cam-
puses.
A resounding failure could
be fatal to organizing efforts-
particularly for the Weather -
man faction, which takes its
name from a Bob Dylan song
line-"You don't need a wea-
therman to know which way the
wind blows."

Weatherman currently con-
trols the SDS National Office
in Chicago. It has tightened
security and taken tentative
steps toward building revolu-
tionary cadres, or leadership
cells.
"They are developing a hard-
ening cadre," a government
source said. "It's not too far
advanced now, but there are
signs it's on the way."
Weatherman has been prepar-
ing for months for the Chicago
demonstrations. "The action is
probably going to make them or
break them," said one source
close to this faction. "After Chi-
cago, it could be all over for
them."

TONIGHT
at 7-9 P.M.

-
rt l t t I ' v1 F
CC .. . .,r_ 1 _"yti

DIAL
8-6416

I OWN Iwo OWN Emu IM MS I

"WORT H CELE ER ATING"
ouns t a MrvIus Climax"

-Detroit News
Michigan Daily

RYM IIL in contrast, is mak-
ing a late entry. If its efforts
fizzle, the faction likely will
blame lack of preparation time.
Weatherman is planning a
rally in Lincoln Park-one of
the battlegrounds during the
Democratic convention. It also
is calling for demonstrations in
high schools, a rock-music fes-
tival, and a march and rally at
the federal court house.
RYM II's schedule is geared
more to working class and non-
white neighborhoods, but' it also
calls for a high school boycott,
a demonstration outside a Chi-
cago factory, street rallies and
a protest against hospital con-
ditions.
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