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October 04, 1969 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-04

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, October 4, 1969

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, October 4, 1969

music

rec
Tom-TlJ

ords
ere credit is due

Indian Summer
starts off with a
stretch at Hill

By BILL THORP
Fall is the time to settle down
and dig into things, but during
the Indian Summer before the
cold weather, a bit of relaxing,
one last stretch, always seems
necessary. Last night at Hill
Aud., the School of Music in-
dulged itself a little and pre-
sented an evening of fun and
nostalgia, their "Pops" concert.
Whetting appetities with some
exciting and familiar short
pieces, the University Philhar-
monia began the festivities with
Bernstein's "Overture to Can-
dide." Conductor Theo Alcan-
tara showed fine control as the
bustling melodies, punctuated
by Philharmonia's fine b r a s s
never lacked precision or tight-
ness.
The group's excellent en-
semble made a selection of three
of Antonin Dvorak's "Slavonic
Dances" a fitting second choice.
From the brassy bombast of the
first to the mad dashing finale
of the final number, these pea-
sant melodies were bright and
clear.
Balancing the flowing senti-
mentality of Tchaikovsky's
"Sleeping Beauty Waltz" with
the musical craft that is in it
was a task easily accomplished
by Alcantara and his orchestra.
This was followed by Ginastera's
dazzling "Malambo," a percus-
sive synchopated fling that dis-
played, again, the Philharmon-
ia's skill.
The mood once set, the stage
was readied for Sigmond Rom-
CHRONICLES OF HELL
APA will sponsor a special
student matinee of Ghelde-
rode's Chronicles of Hell on
Thursday, Oct. 9. Tickets for
this production are priced at
$3,00. Tickets are available at
the Mendelssohn Theatre box
office.

berg's "The Student Prince."
Combining the talents of the
Michigan Chamber Ensemble,
the Men's Glee Club, and six
soloists from the Music School
faculty, conductor Alcantara let
the music work its magic,
Suddenly, it was the time of
long silk skirts, of braided uni-
forms, and easy living. Rom-
berg's expressive melodies al-
lowed tenor John McCollum,
singing the role of Prince Karl
Franz, and soprano Eva Likova,
who played Kathie, to blend
their soaring voices in music of
unabashed romanticism.
The operetta was performed
in a semi-concert version where
the Chamber Ensemble "shared
the stage with the singers.
Among the red-checkered table
cloths and beer steins sat the
Glee Club, lauding the student's
life and, often, commenting on
the budding romance of Prince
Karl and Kathie.
The songs and tunes are
familiar, and woven with sighs
and reverie. The love duet
"Deep in My Heart" echoes
more quietly the sentiments of
the operetta's famous "Drink-
ing Song." And Prince Karl's
bittersweet "Nevermore W i l l
Come Again Those Days of
Youth" prepares us for the des-
perate finale.
All the principals and the
chorus kept the music moving
smoothly, and this is important
in concert versions of operettas
when most of the dialogue is
omitted. Antonio Perez's and
Willis Patterson's deep b a s s
voices lent much power to the
merry-making.
"The Student Prince" is hard-
ly ever performed these days,
but its spirit of slow-paced liv-
ing and full enjoyment of life is
good to have around, once in a
while, as a reminder.

B.B.K
By BERT STRATTON
It is impossible to talk about
Canned Heat, Supersession, or
Cream without bringing up the
name B. B. King -- a man
whose influence pervades the
very core of blues-rock guitar.
Credit. where due, NOW. Dig
B.'s latest album Live and Well
(Bluesway BLS-6031), which is
the equal of any other electrical
guitar recording and is un-
questionable the best of B. B.
King. Yes, B. and his fans have
been waiting a long time for this
record - since 1964 when B.
made his historic, "live" record-
ing at the Regal Theatre in
Chicago.
Live and Well is the master-
piece that $. was dreaming
about during those mediocre re-
cording years in between the
Regal album and now. He once
told Charles Kiel, the author
of Urban Blues, "I won't really
feel like an artist until I get me
some arrangements that really
add a third part to my guitar
and voice and make everything
fit together just right. What I
would really like is a band that
echoes my guitar - like R a y
Charles' band sets off his piano
playing."
MISHA DICTER
200 rush tickets for the Misha
Dicter concert will be available
at 4:00 p.m. Monday at the Hill
Aud. box office. The tickets,
which will cost $1.00, are for
seats located throughout Hill
Aud. with main floor seats still
available. The University Musi-
cal Society has imposed a limit
of two tickets per purchaser.
Dieter is a young American
composer who won the Tchai-
kovsky Competition in Moscow
in 1966.
All unsold tickets for the UMS
Hill Aud. concert' series will be
sold as rush seats at the box
office prior to that day's per-
formance. For Sunday concerts,
rush seats will be available at
1:00 p.m. the day of the con-
cert. Rush tickets for evening
performances will go on sale at
4:00 p.m.

ing:W
Bill Szymezyk, the producer
of Live and Well, solves B.'s
problems with a couple ingen-
ious maneuvers. What he does
is to divide the album into two
parts - a "live" side (recogniz-
ing the effectiveness of B.'s
"live", Regal performance) and
a "well" side, made in the
studio with a talented, white
backup band (solving B.'s ac-
companiment problems.)
After conveniently waiving
the $4 cover charge,twe at last
get the chance (via the record)
to see the King "live in per-
son at New York's world-fam-
ous Village Gate." And what a
show he puts on. He opens it
with "Don't answer the Door",
and he's immediately off on one
of his single note progessions,
crescendoing to a peak, then at-
tacking with a barrage of
chords, and suddenly he cuts
back the volume and sustains a
long one note vibrato that just
won't fade away. You know he's
in the groove ("live" record-
ing tends to shorten warm-up
time.)
King is a blues virtuouso and
he lets everybody know it. Af-
ter all, as he says, "You know,
I ain't ashamed of it people. I
just love to sing my blues." But
if at first you don't get the mes-
sage, Patrick Williams, h i s
trumpeter, and Charlie Boles,
the organist, add a little quasi-
religious sounding accompani-
ment to reinforce B.'s position
- King of the Blues."
He jokes with the audience
(which quickly becomes a minor
annoyance after a few listen-
ings), and then he gets into an
extended instrumental, "My
Mood", a jam that contains
many really fine blues notes -
the kind that make you feel
like squeezing the hell out of
something.
It's time for his favorite,
"Sweet Little Angel" - "I just
love the way she spreads her
wings." And by now it's appar-
ent to everyone that B. has a
one track mind and that it's
focused on woemn. (He doesn't
go in much for other blues top-
ics like poverty or life in the
South.)

B. ends the show with his cus-
tomary finale "Please Accept
My Love" - directed towards
the ladies of course - in which
his voice does as fine a job as
his guitar. (His voice has t h a t
deep, "holier-than-thou" inflec-
tion of a preacher.)
After the show, you take a
quick break, and then flip over
the record and dig the "well"
side, which is more heavy blues
- in effect, the vanguard of
blues recordings. It's sound. is
distinctively more energetic and
raw than the "live" recording,
caused by the fact that the side-
men don't take to playing se-
cond position to B. as kindly as
do his regular men, and t h e y
show it. Al Kooper on piano,
Gerald Jemmott on bass, as
well as Paul Harris also on
piano, put in some exciting ac-
companiment and infrequent
solos. (Most of the latter is left
for B.)
For being somewhat of an im-
promptu session, the group has
a very tight-coiled sound, which
only B.'s smooth talking can
keep corralled. At times t h e
boys even throw in some psy-
chedelic cliches for progess'
sake.. One of their best cuts is
"Let's Get Down to Business", a
song which is a perfect example
of the way B. uses his guitar to
carry the melody instead of to
play responsive choruses to his
voice - which is what most
blues guitarists do, e.g.-John
Lee Hooker, Muddy Waters.
But the last song is the kill-
ALL RIGHT
As a public service, The Daily
would like to inform you that
Neil Young, late of the Buffalo
Springfield and currently with
Crosby. Stills, Nash and Young
will be appearing one night
only, Thursday, Oct. 9, at Can-
terbury House. He will be re-
cording at least one side of his
new solo album.
It isn't clear at this point
whether it will cost anything to
get in, but Young afficionadoes
are advised to start lining up
early. We'll keep you posted.

er, "Why I Sing the Blues", a
jam that made it into the top
twenty on the R&B radio sta-
tions. It has everything that B.
can do in it - vocally as well
as with the guitar. It's also the
only song that B. sings that
isn't about women, but what it
is about is almost as interesting
and that's the relationship be-
tween his blackness and his
blues. As B. puts it in the song:
"When I first got the blues,
they brought me over on
the ship,
Men was standing over me,
and a lot more with a whip,
And everybody want to know,
why I sing the blues,
Well, I've been around a long
tirhe, I've really paid my
dues."
That's B.B. King, still very
much alive and doing quite well,
anyway you look at him.
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
NOW SHOWING
i
art#
Ny Duke Color by DeLuxe
Subscribe to
The Michig(n Daily

a "gently" persuasive style . .. made his appear-
ance in New York last night at the Folklore Center
It was the gentle lilt of country songs that gave
his performance its special flavor. He established a
quick and easy rapport, singing in a light, plaintive,
softly nasal voice . . . and his audience showed that
they shared his feelings."
-New York Times, Sept. 1], 1 969
SATURDAY 1 :30 P.M. WORKSHOP

TONITE
R AY
BIERZL

1421 Hill St.
761-1451
country western
Jimmie Rodgers
Dylan
traditional

I

I

TH0E FIFTH

DIMENSION

CGBW begins at home:
By JEAN HELLER v 1 Now, in the midst of bitter pub- To be sure, safety precautions
EDGEWOOD ARSENAL, Md. UP). lic debate over the necessity of are extensive.
-Among the men stationed at stockpiling chemical and biologi- Before a volunteer is approved
this secluded old Army post are cal weapons, amid loud protests for testing he must pass a week-
70 human guinea pigs whose minds that they are a cruel and inhu- long battery of physical, psycho-
and bodies are used to test a man way to fight a war, the De- logical and psychiatric tests to
debilitating and deadly catalogue fense Department granted an As- assure that he is in perfect men-
of chemical warfare weapons. sociated Press request to tour this tal and physical health. And if he
All of the men are recruited facility and interview the volun- has any second thoughts about
volunteers. teers. subjecting himself to experimen-
Tests show all of them are sane. During the conducted tour, of- tation, he may back out of the'
And yet they've come here- ficials talked freely about the vol- program at any time.
without extra pay, without prom-! unteer program but turned aside "Most of them want to come
ise of exemption from Vietnam many technical questions about here to make an honest-to-God
duty and mostly without qualms- their work and the nature of the contribution to medical science
to allow themselves to be gassed, agents tested on grounds that in- and their country," Col. Blair'
injected and sprayed with the formation was classified. said.
most controversial weapons of _

With

volunteers

In an interview with the volun- the controversy raging over C-B

teers, they were asked how many
were at Edgewood for patriotic.;
reasons.
"Aw, --!" replied Spec. 4"
Joseph Monahan, 26, a burly
Irishman from New York City.
"I'm here for just two reasons-a
reaction against Fort Rucker
- (Ala., where he was stationed)
and cause this place ain't far
from the Jersey Turnpike. If
they'da had the same program in
Nebraska I probably wouldna
went."
Officials at the arsenal, while
not paranoic, are fully aware of

war since the atom bomb.
Edgewood Arsenal doesn't look
sinister enough to be the Nerve
Gas Capital of America.
Its grounds tumble gently down
green hillsides to the shores of
the Chesapeake Bay. Light traf-
fic moves unhurried through typ-
ical Army-issue architecture. Ex-
cept for an occasional aircraft
landing the loudest noises on post
are the birds and the drying au-
tumn leaves.
But perfecting the art of chem-
ical warfare has been the prin-
cipal function of Edgewood Arse-
nal since its founding in 1918.
And since 1922 - for 47 years -
testing on human beings has been
an integral part of operations.
But it has never been publicized.
It is not widely known. It is, at
best, a controversial practice.
FALL RENTALS
2 bedroom
apartment
2-3-4 Man
McKinley Associates
663-6448

"We would never be the first to
use these things in a war," said
Col. Joseph R. Blair, deputy di-
rector for medical sciences. "But
we have to have a strong capa-
bility in this field as a deterrent
against any chemical weapons any
enemy or potential enemy mightI
use against us. We have to de-
velop these things because theyI
are." He did not identify "they."j
"We have to test these drugsi
on people," Blair contended. "You
cannot develop something forl
human beings without testing
them on human beings. It's safe.
We've been doing it since 1922,
and we've never had a serious
accident."

warfare. They allow themselves
moments of black humor when
the subject comes up.
After a demonstration of a
strong liquid irritant called CS,
Dr. Ketchum was asked if the
liquid which had been sprayed
would be cleaned up or allowed
to evaporate.
"Oh, it will just evaporate and
spread out over the area killing
people," he joked bitterly.
TONIGHT
THE CABINET OF
} DR. (ALIGARI
dir. Robert Wiene (1920) r
This Shocker is one of
the Best Examples of Ex-
pressionist Cinema.

BENEFIT CONCERT

I

TICKETS ON SALE
MONDAY, OCTOBER 6

H HERE SATURDAY, OCT. 11
8:00 P.M.-Events Bldg.
MARTIN LUTHER KING FUND

I

v# Spedkhcia

I

Rate

Oct. 9
2:00 P.M.
Question
and
Answer
Session

APA PRODUCTION OF
II
I
TICKETS ON SALE AT
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
BOX OFFICE

ALPHA PHI ALPHA

TICKETS
$3.0
Refreshments
in the
Vandenberg
Room
Michigan
League

First Floor
MICHIGAN UNION

5

m

a

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slept through."
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Michigon Doily

TONIGHT AT 8:00!

MAT. SUN. at 2:30!

I

2

IHA PRESENTS

PERSONS UNDER 18
NOT ADMITTED

SkNEAK PREVIEW
TONIGHT--
following the 8:00 show of "WAR AND PEACE"

"In the tradition of 'Lord of the Flies' and

'If' . . .!V
-Time

g A66
'I B U I I

Directed
John House

.- _ i n mea p 3esUM

Iby
man
by

SEPTEMBER 30-OCTOBER 12
,f lwrcAm &-trcmO-

?" ichtckA
hcirode

plus "PLAY"

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