100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 30, 1969 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 30, 1969

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY f'uesday, September 30, 1 969

- music

Of
By R A PERRY
Few people these d a
walking around A n n
thinking about oboes, bu
are one of the select (I
believing Ars longa, vita
you no doubt think of t
asan emitter of piquan
sounds suitable for pun
lush strings and enliven
valdi concerti. If t h a t
case, you have not her
oboe as played by Harol
berg.
Gomberg, of the Ne
Philharmonic, can make
strument sound as r i cI
clarinet, as think as a b
as haunting as an Englis
as sweet as a flute, and
piquant as, oddly eno
oboe. The Gomberg soun
ceedingly creamy and w
trolled in both tehniq
expression. A new Va
Cardinal r e l e a s e (VS
presents Gomberg's uniq
colorism in worthwhilea
teresting repertoire by Be
Britten and Mozart.
Britten's Fantasy Quar
Six Metamorphoses Afte
the latter new to Schwa
both relatively early and
works of the compose
Fantasy Quartet, for ob
lin, viola, and cello, was
when Britten was a sch
student at the Royal Co
Music and, though it pla
gerly with dissonances, i
t.ially tempers such p
with an English pench
bucolic lyricism, It is "m
in the sense that an ear
ghn Williams symphony
ern. The Fantasy, on
movement, pivots upon
motives with the drama
sized by the strings a ni
the oboe adding aereate
mentation a n d comn
The work holds no metal
pretensions, and, like n
Britten's music, provide
ant divertisement.
Written for solo ob
Six Metamorphoses aft
dramatizes- again with I
flationary posturing-th
formations of Pan, P
Niobe, Bacchus, Narciss
Arethusa. The oboe imit
reed pipe of Pan andt
nienting voice of Niobe;
rates the fall of Phaeto
effective is the "echo" e
Narcissus observes his re
in the pool; here Gi
makes the transitionb
face and reflection astou
smooth and beautiful. Thl
written In 1951, Is quit
and Gomberg's oboe co
be more expressive.
Also included on thi
guard release is the
Quartet in F major a wo
known and needing litt
ment here. Gomberg, Ra
Zaslav, and Stuch perfoi
lingering affection.
A much less successf
guard recording offers G
Novaes playing "favorit
pin." (VCS-10059) Nov
always been one of th
"natural" pianists, that

oboes,
playing always appeared limpid
and flowing, never forced, subtle
y s are in its gradients of tempi and
Arbor coloring, never banal. Unfor-
t if you tunately, Novaes never received
perhaps the sonic reproduction she de-
brevis) served ,and although her Vox
he oboe recordings of Chopin, Mendels-
t, citric sohn, and Beethoven are still to
(ituring be cherished, they always some-
ing Vi- how seemed a distant commo-
is the dity.
rd the On this Vanguard recording,
d Gom- Novaes receives exemplary piano
reproduction, but something has
v Yrk happened to her touch. Tempos
his in-
h s lI' are halting, lines are awkwardly
asa broken, details are exaggerated.
ba ssoon. Her redntions of the Ballade No.
h horn, 3 and the Ballade No. 4 sound
even as almost crude next to Rubin-
igh. an stein's or Ashkenazy's - and I
ell-co- never though "crude" would be
el-con- a word I would use in reference
su and to Novaes. Only the Berceuse,
anguard Op. 57, emerges as successful.
-10064) When one returns to her old
ue oboe recordings of the Nocturnes or
njamin of Schumann's Kinderszenen,
this present album seems a be-
'tet ad wildering fall from grace.
r Ovid, Another disappointing piano
nn. are recital comes from Aleksander
typical Slobodyanik, a twenty-five year
r. The old Russian being promoted in
oe, vio- this country by Angel Records.
written On Angel SR-40109, Slobody-
olarship anik intellectualizes Haydn's
lege of Sonata No. 48 and, in seeking
tys gin- to make every gesture interest-
t essen- ing, effects a precocious and
assages overly-stylized performance that
ant for misses completely both Hadyn's
nodern" wit and the music's arching
ly Vau- line. Four Chopin Mazurkas like-
is mod- 'vise lack internal motivation.
e long Slobodyanik's performance of
march the Prokofiev Sixth Sonata-
empha- the music is both thundering
d with and path:tic- -has been hailed
d orna- as "pianistically brilliant. It
aentary. certainly is powerful and well-
physical controlled. Nevertheless, in
most of those moments of crisp, almost
s pleas- by contrast dainty details which
Prokofiev sets into the m o r e
oe, the monolithic dense passages,
er Ovid Slobodyanik lacks requisite
ittle in- lightness of touch. There is no
e trans- denying the pianist's power and
haeton, skills here, and the Tempo di
us, and walzer movement comes across
ates the quite movingly, but Sandor's
the la- performance on Vox is still both
it nar- more dynamic and more sharp.
n. Most Remember with awe, however,
ffect as that Slobodyanik is only twen-
flection ty-five.
3omberg Columbia seems to have a

o pin a
corner on the kitsch market
these days. They have made a
killing with electric Bach and
their "Favorite Hits of Great
Composers" snippet series sell
by the millions to TV G u i d e
subscribers everywh re. (Real-
ly. is Grieg's Ich Liebe Dich a
"favorite hit?")
Most recently Columbia has
come out with an admittedly
fascinating album (MS 7335,
entitled Moondog. Moondog
seems to be the alias of a blind
composer by the name of Louis
Hardin who writes all his music
in braille. Giving his biography
on the liner notes, Moondog
comes up with one fine anec-
dote: "Rodzinski introduced
me to Toscanini. I made as to
kiss his hand, whereupon he
pulled it away, saying, 'I am
not a beautiful wvoman.'
Like Harry Partch and Nor-
man Nancarrow, Moondog writ-
es musical anomalies that can
only be heard, not categorized.
Exceedingly interested in form
less, unlike Partch, in p u r e
sound), Moondog composes brief
works classically constructed but
of unusual instrumentation.
Drawing deeply upon jazz,
Moondog writes his solo lines
for flugelhorn, alto sax, clar-
inet, and french horn, among
other instruments aligned with
the jazz band. He makes ex-
tensive use of percussions. Of
the eight pieces on the record-
ing, not one exceeds seven min-
utes in length, and dedications
go out to Benny Goodman, Mar-
tha Graham, and Thor the
Nordoom.
What does the music sound
like? Pieces such as Theme and
Lament 1 are lyrical and rhy-
thmically intieresting; they
swing in a slightly arthritic
fashion. Other pieces such as
Symphonique No. 6 sound like
trite movie music arranged by
Lalo Schifrin. All the pieces
seem uncomfortably bound by
their forms yet, without the ar-
matures, the musical ideas
would collapse into triviality.
You may disagree about this
unusual album, but somehow I
feel that the packaging inflates
the meager product.

nd

Mvoon dog

DAILY OFFICIAL
BU LETIN
Official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r tn to
Roon 3528 L.>SA. Bldg., before
'' p.m. of the day preceding publi-
cation and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
Inum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appearn1ce ronly.
Student organizations notices a r e
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30
Day Calendar
wind Instrument Department Stu-
dents: School of Music Recital Hall,
11:30 a.nn,
Department of Speech and Depart-;
iment of Germanic Languages and Lit-
eratures Lecture: Professor Margaret
Dietrich, Director, Institut fuer Thea-
terwissenschaft, The University of
Vienna, 'The Modern Drama" in
English,: Rackhain Amphitheater, 4-10
p.mk.
Computing center Films: "Basic Op-
eration of the IBM Keypunch", and
"Advanced Use of the 029 Keypunch";
1011 Computing Center, 7 and 8 p.m.
Information, 764-4143.
University Symphony Orchestra:
Josef Blatt, conductor and soloist: Hill
Auditorium.8:00 p.m
Depart-ment of Speech and lepart-
Dment of Germanic Languages and Lit-
eratures Lec ture: Heinz Kinderman,
Professor Emeritus., The University of
Vienna, 'Hofmannsthal unc die
Schaupielkunst" (mit Lichtbilden)
Rackhamn Amphitheater, 8:00 p.m.

General Notices
If you wish to do your student teach-
i g Winter Term January 1970,.to
the Secondary Directed Teaching Of-
fice in Room 2292, University School.
no latei' thain September 30, 1969 to
pick up ne'essary infornation and
material and plan to attend a one-
hour group meeting after either 4:30
p mt or 7:00 p.i. on tednesday, Oct.
1. Failurc to follow these instructions
will result in your application being
dropped from the Winter Term directed
teaching porani If it is you inten-
tion to dlop or to change to a later
term, please inform us (Telephone 764-
8402)
The Computing Center short course
on "The Use of Sequential Files and
the Data Cell in MTS", will be con-
tinued in room 1024 of the East En-
gineering Building from 4 to 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday, October 1. 1969. Inquiries
should be directed to Mr. Gary Pirkola
at 764-2410.
Botany Seminar: Dr. Richard A. Dil-
ley, Charles F. Kettering Research Lab-
oratoy, Yellow Springs, Ohio, "Ultra-
structure of Sub-Chloroplast Photosys-
tems I and II Fractins", Wednesday,
October 1, 1139 Natural Science, 4:15
p.m.
English Dept. Undergraduate Steer-
ing Committee: 7:30 p.m., Wednesday,
October 1st, Room 435 Mason Hall.
(open to all taking English Classes,
Woowrow Wilson Fellowships: Nom-
inations for Wodrw Wilsn Fellwships
and Designates for first year graduate
work leading to a career in college
teaching ae due October 20. Only facul-
ty members may nominate candidates.
Eligible for nomination are men andt
women of outstandig ability who are
seiors, or graduates nt now enrolled in
a graduate school, or graduates now in
the amed forces who will be free to en-
ter a graduate school in 1970-71. Sen-
(Continued on Page 8)

ENDING WEDNESDAY

TONIGHT
-7:00-
THE STREET
ir, KARL GRENE (1923)
NOSFERATV
(DRACULAi
dir. F. W. MURNAU (1922
Both Shows FREE
"Brn YourBo ofGarlic"
"A Killer -Merv Griffin
662-8871 Architecture
Oc Auditorium

PREMIERE TONIGHT!

LAW $ 11(1 Harini - (Ii(Is .IJOONDO(,

SEPTEMBER 30-OCTOBER 12
Ifitrwrt cy &PllffeIZ4

S ubscri be to
The ' fichig ariDaily

between
ndingly
le work,
e lovely
uld not
s Van-
Mozart
i'k well-
le com-
iinondt,
rm with
ul Vam-
iuiomar
e Cho-
aes has
e most
is her

BUFFY
SAINTE
MARIE
October 4!

TV 11ElTAI L ,S
$10 per nthl
FREE Service and Delivery
---NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED---
CALL:
Nejac TV Nl ®tallI%
662-5671
SERVING BIG 1IQSCHOOLS SINCE 1961

WOW!
A three-piece Treasure Chest
chicken dinner, plus french fries,
fur only 791' Larqjer take-home
Ornder- also. Try abox -(,(n!
S)MlIIG (s P~rrY StRVIGE
West of Arborlornd

Directed by
John Houseman
plus "PLAY"'by
Samuel Beckett

IF

a~ct0c(

w it
Patrick Hines
Christopher Walken

I

join
The Daily

I

We

offer

no

cure

for

THE ST YLITE
No, University Players' Box Office is not the answer for the potential hermit.
Our very popular season ticket prices (7 plays for $8 or $11!) provide for glori-
ous association with humanity in the warmth of the Trueblood or Mendelssohn
Theatres.

University Players
PLAYBILL 1969-70
THE BALCONY-Genet
October 8-11
TITUS ANDRONICUS-Shakespeare
November 5-8
AMERICA HURRAH--van Itallie
December 3-6
DARK OF THE MOON-Richardson
& Berney
January 28-31
ESPERANZA-S. Shaw
Premiere Production
February 18-21
LIFE IS A DREAM--Calderon
March 11-14
THE PLOUGH AND THE STARS-
Sean O'Casev

If you have failed to purchase your season tickets for the

1969-70 Season at our

ridiculously low prices, (SAVING you SIX DOLLARS or more!), you may do so
today at the Trueblood Box Office, Frieze Building, f r o m 12:30 to 5:00 P.M.
Phone orders accepted at 764-5387.
LAST CHANCE EVER, T O BUY
i 1k inrrn nnirrr1 'n -Ier-T I

i ii

1111

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan