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September 21, 1969 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-09-21

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, September 21, 1969

Pe TeTHMIHGNDIYSnaSpebr2,19C

- - __

r

CON TROVERS Y

'69

r

I

Of late Mr. Capp
caustic remarks on

has attracted widespread

attention

with

his

the

current disturbances on

college campuses.

His views, delivered largely to college audiences, have evoked a
wide range of responses, ranging from honorary degrees to riots.
"They ought to teach Mayor Daley to read and write, then make

him president of

Harvard .

. . he knows

how to handle students."

SUNDAY, SEPT. 28

2 P.M.

$1.25

I

Charles Evers' recent election to the mayoralty of Fayette, Miss., earned overnight fame for the area,
bringing messages of congratulation from President Nixon, Lyndon Johnson, Hubert Humphrey, Ed-
mud Muskie, Eugene McCarthy and many other national figures. In his short term of office as the
first black mayor of a racially mixed Mississippi town since the Reconstruction, he has wrought radi-
cal changes in the stagnant, racist atmosphere of Fayette, cleaning up the sub-standard living con-
ditions, abolishing the double standard of justice for blacks and whites, and bringing in new indus-
try. Most recently, his discovery that the previous administration had bankrupted the town govern-
ment, leaving him unable to meet the city's payrolls, has captured nationwide attention and sympa-
thy. It is Evers' drive to raise funds for his daring experiment in social restructuring that brings this
dynamic man to Ann Arbor.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 19
Sen.

2 P.M.

$1.25

GEORGE

cGO

ER

Senator George S. McGovern, the first Democrat to win a Senate post in South Dakota since 1936,
has emerged as one of the most prominent and outspoken political figures of our time. In the Senate
and while briefly contending for the Democratic Presidential nomination in 1968, he had been a lead-
ing opponent of the Vietnamese war. His crusade continues as he recently chastized the Nixon ad-
ministration for continuing the "tragic course of the Johnson administration.
On the domestic front, Senator McGovern has created a national awareness of the sub-standard liv-
ing conditions of our country's poor, reinforcing his image as an uncompromising and ccnstructive
critic; a man of articulate action as well as words.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26

2 P.M.

41.25

ILL

F.

B

CKLEY,

Jr.

Willy, urban and controversial, William F. Buckley is today's most eloquent exponent of the right.
His disenchantment with the theory of human perfectability has placed him in the position of being
a gilded thorn in the side of the Liberal Establishment. Buckley's contentiousness and strong opin-
ions have most recently attracted attention in the form of his much publicized TV sallies with Gore
Vidal during the 1968 Democratic National Convention. Editor of the conservative journal, THE NA-
TIONAL REVIEW, and author of six books, including THE UNMAKING OF A MAYOR and UP FROM
LIBERALISM, William F. Buckley is today's most eloquent exponent of the right.

y.

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