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September 20, 1969 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-09-20

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Saturday, September 20, 1969

THE MICHIGAN) DAILY

Page Nine

Saturday, Septcmbcr 2.0, 969 THE MICHIGAN DAiLY Page Nine

All_

eyes

on

' The

Rug'
The Line ups
0Offenise

InI

Vandy

opener

Speed key
to rel)eI
victory
By JOEL BLOCK
Sports Editor
When 22 mnen trot onto the
field today to play what is
called the Michigan - Vander-
bilt football game, no one will
be looking at them.
True, there will be 70.000 plus
maniac football fans in Michigan
Stadium surrounding theta, but'
they won't be looking at the play-
ers. Nor the coaches. Nor the band.
Nor the mdale cheerleaders.
The Michigan-Vanderbilt game
at Ann Arbor begins at 1:30
and will be carried over radio
stations W114, 950 AM1; W~PAG,
1050 AM1I; WAAM, 1600 AM;,
and WUOM1, 91.7 F31
They will be looking at the Rug.
The Rug is1" high, 88,285
square feet in area and the most
expensive wall-to-wall carpeting
job ever designed in Michigan.
The Rug is the ingenious inven-
tion of some highly-paid chemist'
of the Minnesota Mining and
Manufacturing Company and is
called Tartan Turf. And it works.
The Michigan football team has
conducted its entire fall practice'
onl the Rug the equivalent of 12

(88)
(77)
168)
(54)
(75)
(53)
(80)
(15)
(14)
(10)
(42)

VANDERBILT
Karl Weiss (242)
Bob Asher (255)
Chuck Springfield (211)
Sandy Haury (219)
Jim Combs (220)
Don Johnston (210)
Curt Chesley (178)
John Miller (170)
Dave Strong (188)
Doug Mathews (170)
Allan Spears (190)

TE
7T
LG
C
RG
QT
SE
QB
RB
NB

MIICHIIGANi
(88) Jinn Mandich 1 2153)
(72) Dan Dierdorf (239)
(60) Bob Baungartner (213)
(53) Buy Murdock (210)
(56) Dick Caldarazzo (215)
(71) Jack Harpring (218)
(30) Paul Staroba (201)
(27 Don Moorhead (193)
(18) John Gabler (209)
(22) Glenn Doughty (193)
48) Garvie Craw (218)

Def eise

' (89)
174)
(65)
(91)
(67)
(50)
(64)
(32)
(17)
(25)
(43)

VANDERBIL T
Noel Stahl (216)
John Robinson (210)
Les Lyle (225)
Pat Toomey (227)
Steve Fritts (205)
Bill McDonald (190)
Terry Rettig (188)
Christie Hauck (187)
Don Miller (179)
Mlal Wall (189)
Neal Smith (189)

L E
LT
RT
RE
LB-MG
LB
LB
RB
1IB
IIB
S

(90)
(82)
(74)
194)
(39)
(70)
(97)
(35)1
(24)
(23)
(29)

MICHIIGAN
Mike Keller )121'2)
Pete Newell (222)
Dan Parks (240)
Al Carpenter (21)
Henry Hill (210)
Marty huff (220)
Ed Mloore 1210)
ITom Darden (185)
Brian IHealy (170)
Tom Curtis (190)
Barry Pierson (1751

full games of wear, and it. looks
like carpet-layers just finished the
north end zone. It's that beauti-
ful.

daily

DI ilv--J erry Wcch.-h'r
.Iill er setss(toilir ou,

()ilartedrk 'l oll/I

But beauty isn't everything and
we have to go to Vanderbilt head '
coach Bill Pace for a testimonial. i s p o r t
"I've never coached a team on
artifical turf, but I'm all for' this NIGHT EDITOR:
one." Pace said yesterday after his
team gamboled about The Rug ERIC SIEGEL
during a short practice. *"This is
the team's fiirst experience on Tar-
tan Turf and the boys told me they of those 70,000 critical onlookers,
had no trouble making cuts on it." has had the minor complication
For Pace, cuts are important, as! of a shoulder' separation to con-
his defense depends on speed and tend with the past week. Doughty,
agility, not on size. The four-man a converted split end. will run
line averages less than 220 and from an I-formation like Ron
the linebackers less than 200 Johnson did, comes fromn Detroit.
p~ounds, but all ar'e experienced, like Ron Johnson. and will have
Vandy had the best pass defense Garvie Craw blocking for him, like
in the SEC last season and the Ron Johnson did. Now what was
reason was senior safety Neal that about pressure?
Smith. Smith returns this year j
with five interceptions to his credit'
but. no other familiar' faces in the scnay
Mal Wall. a red-shirt last year,
takes one of the defensive halfback
slots while Christie Hauck takes
the other. When asked why he
shifted Hauck, a two-year starter
at. the monster position, to his
present r'ole, Pace replied, "No
halfback."
But if Paces defensive crew'
liked The Rug, his offensive pla-
toon will fall in love with it. Both
Pace and Michigan coach Bo
Schembechler have concurred that
the "quickness" of the Tartan sur-
face will give the edge to the of-
ftenses.
Schernbechler hopes to gain that
edge with an unproven quarter-
back, an untes ted wvingback, and a$
fullback that earned his keep help-
ing Ron Johnson become an All-
Aeialatya.The quarterback. Dyon Moor-
he ad, has the unenviable position
of being long on pr'ess clippings
and shor't on experience. Last year
hie appleared in the limelight sev-
eral times as an understudy tof.£
Dennis Brown, leading passer in
the Big Ten. Unfortunately, he was'
just that, an under'study, hardly
playing enough time 136 minutes)
to work tip) a sweat.
The rookie wingback is Glenn
Doughty, who besides having to >{x-
worry about the infinite p~ressures

-DzAily-- Jerry Wechslet
I (midlerb ilt (C'Iic I Pace Cx~tmiies the weave Cof (lie rug

Ciur't (.Iitsle 1eVI cs (a one-iuiidetI si~ib (it I/he bill

Major LageStanding

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Pitt..llir2( XI 1, .Pct.
St. 1Louis 81 i0 536
lit it at opr i 2, t i 91 :.39
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XLos ,A ite8li,82 167 ,55)
CiittialIi 80 69 .53i
11.'IiI o git ii i'_ 2 1
Pl ',tvi it).,Philadelphia , 1 s
P1 t sIitirght 8. New York 0. '2ndl
Chicago~i 2. tit. Louir 1, 1st, 10 i,.
tt.- (olts 7 Chicwgo ',.2tid
ulntol nt 3. Ciicillititi2
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35

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SUSRITOM THE MTICHGAN DAILY
UNION-LEA\GUE

Do you have to give up your identity
to make it in a big corporation ?

You've heard the stories:
One big corporation forbids yo; t
wearanything but white shirts.
Another says itwantsyouto be"1ma

hzd that here scared of peop; who developed the high-energy liquid
whoi don't fit the "noarm"? "laser, who camne up with the sharpest

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