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September 20, 1969 - Image 8

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, September 20, 1969

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturay,-eptemer 2. l1.969

Big

Ten

bloodbath

commences

By ELLIOTT BERRY
The helmeted animals will
stand and glare menacingly at
their prospective victims. Then
suddenly at the sound of a
single shrill whistle they rush
to brutally beat, kick and slam
any helpless soul in their path.
And their brutal tactics at.-
tract thousands of hysterically
screaming students caught up in
the awful violence.
This has been a common
place occurrence long before the
South University, Peoples' Park,
and Chicago debacles. As a mat-
ter of fact it has been an in-
timate part of the fall collegiate
scene in the Midwest since the
turn of the century, from Field-
ing Yost to Douglas Harvey.
This organized student vio-
lence which has c o m e to be
known as Big Ten football gets
underway again this afternoon
at nine spots across the nation
and should provide enough
headknocking to satisfy Mayor
Daley.
The meanest and roughest of
lie Big Ten establishment to
et started today just might
lurn out to be Michigan State.
In a surprising change of form
Spartan head coach Duffy
l)augherty is beaming with op-
i nism about his Green Giants;
optimism which he was reluc-
ant to admit even for his super
rams of '65 and '66. But sure
enough Duffy is bubbling. "This
year's team compares favorably
with the '66 squad in a few
areas." he noted.
Today the unheralded Wash-
ington Huskies come to Spartan
Stadium to see if Duffy's Spar-
tans are for real. Indeed, if
Michigan State is half as good

as the tricky little Irishman
says they are, the Huskies, who
finished dead last in the Pacific
Eight Conference last season,
are in for a rough afternoon.
A huge Spartan front f o u r
led by Gary Nowak and Ron
Curl, and a fierce set of line-
backers returning the likes of
Don Law, Ken Little and Rich
Saul (who will not start but is
ready to play) should be quite
enough to handle the strong
running of Husky backs Harvey
Blanks and Bob Cornell.
The secondary, with Jay Bres-
lin as the only letterman, is the
weak link in the Spartan de-
fense but the seemingly inept
passing game of the Huskies
should not threaten the green
defenders.
The Huskies will, however,

I

FOOTBr
Vandenr
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in a g
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should
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Washin
If th
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The offensive lire is "the bes
toted S|$ 's head f ootbal
Daugherty, on the eve of Ii
openier algainlst tIh e (IniUrersity

This Weekend in Sports
AI,- RUGBY-
ilt at Michigan Stadittun, Sarnia saints at Wines field, 4:30
. Ipmrn.
amne situation. But the "We're going to have to rely
e line which Duffy has primarily on our passing at-
"the best I've seen here," tack," noted Mollenkopf ac-
provide Triplett with knowledging the loss of the ir-
rotection than Robben replacable Leroy Keyes and Per-
g has given ROTC. All- ry Williams. But this is of little
an Frank F o r e m a n help to TCU as their very inex-
also be a key factor in perienced secondary may get
the Spartans over the burned badly by ace quarter-
gton defense. back Mike Phipps' pinpoint
ere is going to be an aerials.
elming show of defensive While Purdue, Ohio State,
h this afternoon it is and Michigan State are hard
to come from Purdue. hitting and powerful they are
ilernakers will pit their at least straight forward and
predictable. Indiana, on the
other hand, is wild and unpre-
tI I'ce se nhere," dictable and, like Richard Nix-
on, capable of pulling tremen-
!l cOlch h )llffy dous reversals just when you
think they are dead and gone.
iS te(IlIt'S SCUSORl This could make the Hoosiers
the most dangerous team in the
of f(1S hiiito. conference.
Coach John Pont sends Har-
ry Gonso, John Isenbarger and
aing and highly mobile Co. against an unranked b u t
- which includes eight optimistic Kentucky squad.
s from last season's "The Wildcats, under former
leading defense -against Notre Dame defensive coach
y TCU offense. John Raye could be the most
rightest spot on the TCU improved team in the SEC" cau-
is the passing of quar- tioned Pont," and a victory over
Steve Judy, but unfor- us in the opener would put them
for the Horned Frogs' well on their way," The passing
fense is the forte of the combination of quarterback
t Boilermaker defense. Stan Forston and end Phil
Ten safety Tim Foley is Thompson represents Kentucky's
st acclaimed but Randy best chance for an upset as once
and Rich Mahurt are again defense is Indiana's num-
pable of grounding the ber one question mark.
Frogs' attack. Pont, however, is optimistic

provide a good test for junior
quarterback Bill Triplett and his
triple option offense. "Owens
(Washington head, coach Jimi
always fields a strong defense
and this year is no exception,"
noted Daugherty. While the
Spartan offense has run wild in
piractice, Triplett has yet to
prove that he has overcome his
tendency to give away the foot-
ball on crucial drives that vas
so costly to the Spartans last
season.
Triplett's n e w l y developed
passing finess is also unproven

intimida
defense
veterans
leagueb
a spotty
The b
offense
terback
tunately
pass def
excellen
All Big
the mos
Cooper,
also ca
Horned

about his defense, noting "This
is the best group I've had here
at Indiana." While that may
well be the case it by no means
implies there is not room for
great improvement. F o r since
arriving in Bloomington two
years ago offense has been
Pont's breadwinner often in
spite of the defense.
This afternoon that offense
should be stronger than ever.
With hard running fullback
Hank Pogue to compliment Is-
enbarger in the ground game,
and talented junior split e n d
Eric Stolberg to ease the pres-
sure on veteran flanker J a d e
Butcher, a healthy Gonso is
likely to have a field day with
the Wildcat's mediocre defense.
At Madison, Wisconsin stu-
dents are likely to witness their
second bloody confrontation of
the year. This time, however, it
will be Oklahoma dishing out
the beating instead of the Na-
tional Guard.
This season's slightly improv-
ed Badger team has little chance
of providing coach John Coatta
with his first victory in two
years. The Sooners come into
town ranked among the nation's
top ten teams.
Highlighted by Heisman Tro-
phy candidate halfback Steve
Owens, the Sooners sport an
awesome offensive machine. If
somehow the Badger defense
can rise to stop Owens they still
have one of the nation's t o p
sophomore quarterbacks to con-
tend with in Oklahoma's J a c k
Mildren.
The beleaguered Badger of-
fense shows little hope of pene-
trating the huge front wall of
the Sooners with enough regu-
larity to match what Owens and
Co, can put on the scoreboard.
It would take direct participa-
tion by the campus SDS to halt
Coatta's winless streak.
The outlook is only slightly
better for the haples Northwes-
tern Wildcats who have an un-
enviable opening date with
Notre Dame at South Bend.
The Irish offense is thinner
and greener than any that
Coach Ara Parseigian has hand-
led since he took John Huarte
off the bench upon his arrival
at Notre Dame.
Nevertheless, the Irish figure
to go a long way on the gift-
ed arm of junior quarterback
Joe Theismann and the thun-
dering slants of fullback Jeff
Zimmerman. With massive line-
man Mike McCoy anchoring the

-S"l

-Dally--Eric Pergeaux
MICHIGAN STATE FULLBACK EARL ANDERSON tries the center of the line in last years

loss to Michigan. This year
quarterback Bill Triplett will
defense the Irish are an over-
whelming favorite. over the
Wildcats.
About the only bright spot
for Northwestern mentor Alex
Agase is his junior quarter-
back Dave Shelbourne who was
third in total offense in t h e
conference last season. Un-
fortunately the Wildcat offense
begins and ends with Shelbourne.
Iowa and Illinois represents
two refreshingly new faces
among Big Ten contenders and
both have excellent opportuni-
ties to get off to big starts
against two of the Pacific
Eight's weaker sisters.
Iowa takes on Oregon State
xxho was demolished last week-
end by UCLA 37-0. The rejuven-
ated Hawkeyes have the offen-
sive punch to give the Beavers
more of the same. Junior quar-
terback Larry Lawrence is the
focal point of the, well balanced
attack with setbacks Danny
Gunner and Levi Mitchell car-
rying the bulk of the ground
game.
The Hawkeye defense is'sus-
pect but it is unlikely to get
much of a test from Oregon
State's impotent attack.
Illinois coach Jim Valek is
determined to get back into the
running with a sophomore quar-
terback, and against Washing-

ton State he just might be suc-
cessful. The Cougars finished
7th in the Pacific Eight last
season an'd they may have to
fight hard to do that well this
year.
Like seemingly everyone else.
the Illini are putting their hop-
es on a triple option offense.
Today, with a little luck they
will equal their total number
of wins in 1968.
Arizona State ,at the bottom
of the nation's top 20 grid pow-
ers, plays host to Minnesota in

what could turn out to be the
closest contest of the day. Ari-
zona State returns almost every-
one from its 8-2 team which
finished second to Wyoming in
the Western Athletic Confer-
ence last season. State is led by
halfback Art Malone, who runs
a 9.6 hundred.
Minnesota is headed by sig-
nal caller Phil Hager. coming
off a mediocre junior season.
Because half of their team is
sophomores the Gophers are a
slight underdog.

however, Anderson, now a junior, will see less -of the middle as MSU
command his team from a triple-option offense.

B
Big Ten pick

,0 0

I GN
965N UP HERE POR
BETHLEHEM MSTE E L
_NTEINEVIEEWSW
4
J a
1,q\
ay~I

---I

GAMMA PHI BETA
OPEN HOUSE
after the game
with The Floating Opera
formerly The Fox)
1520 SOUTH UNIVERSITY

. seniors prognosticate
Calm down now.
We realize that viewing the Big Ten grid predictions of the Daily
sports editors has put you into such a fit of excitement that you just
embraced your roommate (hopefully you're in a coed dorm). Still and
all, try to contain that urge to go tearing down the hall naked scream-
ing, "Those stupid idiots did it again" until you have at least heard
the reasons for our astute revelations.
'he prognosticating of the sports editors is conducted with very
serious consideration for all aspects of the problem. We realize that
these choices will be taken for at least the worth of two grains of salt,
and so we devote our utmost energies towards providing an accurate
appraisal of what we think will happen this season.
A quick glance at the results will immediately make one thing
apparent - we could agree on about nothing. The only team which
received unanimous blessings of the editors was Illinois. However, it
is dubious that the team will take much delight in knowing they
should finish eighth in the conference.
The prediction for the Wolverines is much more hazy, especially
after all their injuries. One radical editor. though, still bellows "The
Maize and Blue forever," as he chose Michigan to top the conference.
Another of the prognosticators seemed much more pessimistic as she
commented, "They'll be lucky if they mpke fifth place." And yet a
third wizard refused to justify his fourth place prediction. "I don't
think those sort of things are fit to print in a decent paper like the
Daily," were his words.
No matter what the thinking for the Wolverines, the idea that
the Buckeyes would at least finish up in the standings was unanimous
with three first-place predictions and a couple of second-place guesses.
Knowing how ebullient Coach Woody Hayes is, he will undoubtedly
mutter, "So?" when he finds out he's favored to repeat as Big Ten
leader,
The closest battle in the conference will certainly be for the
most cherished post 'cellar dweller.' The raging battle to see who
makes the most mistakes. Northwestern or Wisconsin, should be
closely decided in favor of the hapless Badgers. After all, a team
which hasn't won a game in three years certainly wouldn't want to
spoil its record.
One of the writers on the staff, however, was skeptical of the
editor's ability to properly judge the potentials of the teams "since
they haven't even seen that much of the Wolverines, with Schem-
bechlr's closed practices and alt"
The editors. thousgh, feel that their four years of astute ob-
servation of Big Ten football qualifies them to at least throw in their

1' '

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Come as you are!
OCTOBER 13, 1969
Now's the time to sign up at your placement office for an interview with the Bethlehem Steel Loop
Course recruiter. This could be the start of something big!
And just what IS the Bethlehem Steel Loop Course? Glad you asked! It's our management
development program for graduates with bachelors' or advanced degrees.
Bethlehem loopers (150 to 200 every year) spend four swinging weeks at our home offices in
Bethlehem, Pa. Then, primed with information about the entire corporation and rarin' to go, they re-
port to the appropriate plants or departments for their first assignments. Then, onward and upward!
Where would YOU fit into the Loop Course? Check your degree or the one most similar to it:

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING-Engineering or me-
chanical maintenance departments of steel plants, fabri-
cating works, mining operations, and shipyards. Fuel
and combustion departments. Supervision of production
operations. Marine engineering assignments in Ship-
building Department. Also: Sales or Research.
METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING-Metallurgical de-
partments of steel plants and manufacturing operation.
Engineering and service divisions. Technical and super-
visory positions in steelmaking departments and roling
mills. Also: Research or Sales.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS-Technical and supervisory
positions in coke works, including production of by-
product chemicals. Fuel and combustion departments,
including responsibility for operation and maintenance
of air and water pollution control equipment. Engineer-
ing and metallurgical departments. Steelmaking opera-
tiors. Also: Research or Sales.
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING-Positions in steel plans,
fabricating works, shipyards, and mines. Engineering
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CIVIL ENGINEERING-Fabricated Steel Construction
asignments in engineering, field erection, or works
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Technical and supervisory positions in large production
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MINING ENGINEERING-Our Mining Department op-
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modern and efficient in the industry. This 10,000-man
activity offers unlimited opportunities to mining en-
gineers. Also: Research.
NAVAL ARCHITECTS AND MARINE ENGINEERS-
Graduates are urged to inquire about opportunities in
our Shipbuilding Department, including the Central
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OTHER TECHNICAL DEGREES-Every year we recruit
loopers wth technical degrees other than those listed
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ACCOUNTANTS- Orsdates in accountimg or busines
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OTHER tiJN-TFCWMIr nri

-
BEIT MIDRASH OF ANN ARBOR
COURSE SELECTION FORM
CLASSES BEGIN THIS WEEK!
- THEMES OF MODERN JEWISH HISTORY
Tuesday at 8 Mr. Rockaway and Mr. Harrison
--BASIC JUDAISM-JEWISH ETHICS
Tuesday at 7 Rabbi Goldman
HEBREW-BEGINNING, INTERMEDIATE,
ADVANCED
Beginning-Wednesday at 7
Intermediate-Tuesday at 8
Advanced-Monday at 7:30
-__TORAH STUDY-BOOK OF GENESIS
Monday at 8 - Rabbi Tomsky
SEMINAR: ISRAEL AND EGYPT 1936-66
Tuesday at 8:30 Mr. Katan and Mr. Ben-Dak
- _YIDDISH-BEGINNING AND INTERMEDIATE
Beginners, Monday at 7:30 Dr. Krahmalkov
Intermediate, to be arranged
-INTRODUCTION TO JEWISH MUSICOLOGY
Wednesday at 7 Mr. Ben Yochanan
SEFER YESHIYAHU (Conducted in Hebrewi
Sunday at 4 Dr. Strikowsky
SEMINAR: PERSONAL WORTH AND COLLECTIVE

Ohio State
Indiana
Michigan State
MICHIGAN
Purdue
Iowa
Miunnesota
Illinois
Northivcestvyii
W'.isconsin

JR AB BC
10 10 9
9 8 10
6 9 7
7 6
8 6 8
4 1 4
3 , 3
2 1 1

JF
9
6
10
5
8
4
.1

RW
10
8
9
6
5
7
1
3

Con.
48
41
38
36
32
27
23
15
8
7

two cents worth.
So for those who are interested. here's their two

cents worth.

I.M. TOUCH FOOTBALL OFFICIALS
ARE NEEDED
Beginning officials are paid at a rote of 2 66/hour Any
interested person should call 663-4181.
ENTRIES FOR ALL-CAMPUS ICE HOCKEY TEAMS
CLOSE Wed., Sept. 24th at 4:30 p.m. $50 fee
fee is reuired for 'each team entry
' 1 1 RENTA12mmLS
$10 per iii on tli

I

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