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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 18, 1969 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-09-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WINNER!S ACADEMY AWARDS
INCLUOING BEST ACTRESS KATHARINE HEPBURN
NOW SHOWING 3RD
AT REGULAR PRICES WEEK
PETER O'TOOLEKATHARINE HEPBURN
LION IN
_ WINTZR )SD
DIAL _VSHOWS AT
-69 1:15-3:40
5-6290 i 6:20-8:55
most popular play in emu
summer theatre history
eastern michiqan
university theatre
Saturday
September 20
on a 7.00 and 10:00 P M.
HOT
tin Sunday
roof September 21
8:00 P.M.
ALL SEATS RESERVED-$1.75
FOR RESERVATIONS: 482-3453
Box Office Oven Dailv: 12:45-8:30 P.M.
AIR-CONDITIONED DANIEL QUIRK AUDITORIUM
BONUS PRODUCTION
- -

paiie

( '7j 4c

1flriitn

Daitty

NEW1S PHONE: 7641-09552
IBUSINESS I'II1ONE: 764-005505

Friday, September 19, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

f

A, I
4"',

the
news today
b I "/ A Y1ssc itd Pe)411x C1 e Press uI~~ )~~ Seic, e
AFL-CIO CHIEF GEORGE MEANY yesterday testified that
Judge Clement F. Haynsworth is unfit to serve as Chief Justice
on the Supreme Court.
Meany said the U.S. Circuit Court Judge is anti-labor, indifferent
to the hopes of blacks and has a lack of ethical standards. He assail-
ed President Nixon's nominee to the high court after Haynsworth
was endorsed by attorney Leonard Walsh of New York, chairman of
the Amnerican Bar Association's committee on federal judges.
Walsh said Haynsworth "is a man of impeccable integrity" and'
that his professional qualifications are "at the top."
The Senate Judiciary Committee heard this conflicting testimony'
on its third day of hearings on the nomination.
PRESIDENT NIXON made an urgent appeal for peace in
Vietnam and the Mid-East in a half-hour policy speech to the
United Nations yesterday.
He called on the Soviet Union in particular to help alleviate the
Arab-Israeli crisis and reverse the strategic arms race.
In his first speech before the U.N. Nixon also blamed Hanoi for
failure to get agreement in Paris on a peaceful end to the Vietnam
war.
THE FORMER U.S. GREEN BERET COMMANDER in South
Vietnam and five of his staff officers were ordered by the Army
last night to stand trial on charges of murdering a suspected Viet-
namese double agent.
The Army has never publicly released details of the case.
One attorney for the defense said the killing was ordered by the
U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. The CIA, through private briefings
in Washington, has denied any such involvement.
Various other, sources have said the victim was Chu Yen Thai
Khac and that he was killed and his body dumped into the South
China Sea after evidence developed linking him with North Vietna-
mese agents. The body was never recovered.
The six special officers will be tried by two separate court-mar-
tials, each on charges of murder and conspiracy to murder.
Charges against a warrant officer and a sergeant also accused
in the case "are being held in abeyance." the Army said. pending the
outcome of the other case.
A HEARING WAS ORDERED yesterday on a request for an
autopsy on Mary Jo Kopechne's body.
Massachusetts Dist. Atty. Edmund Dinis said blood was present
in the nose and mouth of Miss Kopechne when she was found dead
in Sen. Edward Kennedy's car July 19. In a four-page amendment to
his original autopsy petition. Dinis said the presence of blood "may
or may not have been consistent with death by drowning."
Common Pleas Judge Bernard C. Brominski, who had demanded
more solid evidence from Dinis to show that an autopsy would re-
solve "the doubt and suspicion surrounding the death." set the hear-
ing for Sept. 29.
The district attorney said an inquest into the death of Miss Ko-
pechne may follow "if the autopsy should disclose that her death re-
sulted from some other cause than drowning."
DESPITE AN AFL-CIO THREAT to expel the Inter-
national Chemical Workers for joining the Alliance for Labor
Action (ALA). Walter Reuther said yesterday several other
unions have applied for membership in ALA formed by his
United Auto Workers and the Teamsters Union.
So far the Chemical Workers is the only AFL-CIO union to join
ALA, and AFL-CIO President George Meany wants their 110,000
members expelled as a lesson to the federation's other 121 unions
that they can't have one foot in his camp and the other in Reuther's.
Meany views the alliance as a competitive organization, damaging
to the trade union movement. Reuther says this isn't so-that the
ALA "is not a dual labor organization."

,(arpil Ogl 0t

Housepa
Electoral

l

Something '

3fishy on
By NADINE COHODAS
Seafood Expert
A carp on Ingall's St. Y
must be kidding.
Well, actually there are t
carp on Ingalls St.-swimm
lazily in "Little Butch,"'
cherubic fountain between B
Aud. and the Michigan Leag
It's nothing unusual, ho
ever, and University offici
and employes seem to be take
the fish in stride.
"We get carp, gold fish aj
s quite a few other little good
in there," says Robert Hann
man grounds foreman int
Von* plant department.
"We try to get them out aliv
he adds, "other wise kids thr
rocks at the fish and kill th(
They float to the top, and th
there's an awful smell arou:
the area."
If the fish stay in good heal
sometices they aren't remov
"Around commencement t
summer, we had a few fish
there, but we left them" Ha
selman says.
rssbl
College

Inga is
Although Hanselnan says the
University really doesn't know
where the fish come from, the
ou candy and gum lady at the
League says, "I guess every now
wo and then somebody goes down
ing to the river to fish and then
the puts them in the pool."
Hill The Huron River could not
ue. be reached yesterday to verify
w- this hypothesis. but early Wed-
als nesday morning Nepture report-
ing edly noticed the disappearance
of two fish.
nd Hanselman says carp in the
lies pond can turn out to be a cost-
el- ly prank if too many people
the take pot shots at the fish. "The
whole underground system of
'e," fountains is connected by fine
'ow copper tubing," he says. When
etn. stones got in the pipes, it
aen "wrecks the tubing system and
nd it's very expensive to fix."
Sometimes the fountain can
.th, be functional. Occasionally a
ed. domesticated passerby dumps
his detergent into the pool, maybe
in to do his laundry.
an- "When you see bubbles," Han-
selman says, "that's soap suds."
to enttd
votinlg
Bill goes to
Senate vote

VIETNAM
Time's Up
Action Teach-in
with anti-war
action workshops
September 19-20

I

__ . _ ___

vim

VERBAL

1N1'EUCOIJU1SE
Talk with us at the
CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL
Office if you are interested in a
position as chairman of:

MSU strike

WASHINGTON o - T h e
House approved a far-reach-
i n g constitutional change
yesterday that would abolish
the Electoral College and pro-
vide for electing the president
by direct popular vote.
Before it can become the 26th
amendment to the Constitution it
must get through the Senate by'
a two-thirds margin and be rati-
fied by 38 states -- both formid-
able obstacles.
In any event. it appears unlike-
ly the ratification process could
be completed in time to put the
new procedure into effect by the
1972 election.
But seven months ago when the
House Judiciary Committee began
hearings on electoral reform few
people thought such a sweeping
proposal would even reach the
House floor.
Its adoption by the required
two-thirds majority of the House
is a triumph for Rep. Emanuel
Celler D-NY , chairman of the
Judiciary Committee, and for the
House leaders of both parties.
A greatdeal of the responsibility
for moving the reform measure
this far must go indirectly to
former Alabama Gov. George Wal-
lace whose third- party campaign
for the presidency last year spot-
lighted what many critics see as
the dangerous weaknesses of the
present syst:m.
During the week of debate that
preceded yesterday's vote Wal-
lace's bid to block an electoral
vote victory for either major
party candidate and throw t h e
election into the House was con-
stantly brought forward as a
major reason for making a
change.
The plan now approved by t h e
House is the most drastic of all
See HOUSE, Page 7

~O~L d44~07~.W'

LITERATURE--JOURNALISM
DRAMA-CINEMA
TECHNICAL DIRECTOR
COORDINATING ART
PUBLIC RELATIONS
PUBLICITY
TREASUR E
SECRETARY
MUSIC
DANCE
ART
TICKETS
USHERS

2nd Floor Union
CAF Office for
info sheet
Interviews
Sept. 23, 24, 25

DIAL 8-6416
TODAY AT
7-9 PM
FOR
ALL
YOUNG
LOVERS
WHEREVER
YOU
ARE l

Picketing maintenance workers stand at the entrance to Michigan State University. The strike by
the local 1583 of the AFL-CIO has kept the school from opening according to schedule.
SOUTH QUAD DISCUSSION:
Regent raps on bookstore

--,

The motion picture to be
seen again andagain- A MAN
ANd AWOMAN

ACADEMY
AWARDS
WINNER.

By MICHAEL THORYN
"I just came to see what a Re-~
gent looks like," said Sara Fitz-
gerald,'73.
Miss Fitzegerald and 45 other
students went to South Quad's
West Lounge last night to hear
Regent Lawrence Lindemer <R-
Stockbridge', Student Govern-
ment Council President Marty
McLaughlin, English Prof. Marvin
Feldheim, and Robert Graham.
manager of Follett's bookstore, in

a panel discussion on the proposed
student book store.
Members of the audience di-
rected complaints at Graham.
One girl said she bought a used
book and was charged 15 cents
more than the book sold for when
it was new.
"I hope the practice isn't gen-
eral." Graham replied.
The $1.75 fee that students
voted to have levied on their tui-
tion to help fund the book store in'
last year's refendum would be re-

garded as a tuition increase, Lin-
demer said, and the State Legis-
lature might cut appropriations
accordingly.
Lindemer said there is a bill-
currently in the legislature to
eliminate the tax on books sold;
to students in private book stores.E
Once this is passed students will
be effectively getting a four per
cent discount on all book pur-
chases, Lindemer reasoned.
Several students said theyl
doubted the bill would be passed.

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS BRING RESULTS-USE THEM

DOUBLE FEATURE

PASOLINI'S EROTICISM IS
SOMEBODY ELSE'S OBSCENITY!
'TEOREMA" is the story of a middle-class family visit-
ed by a beautiful young man who proceeds to make
love to the mother, father, son, daughter, maid-and
then departs.
The Office Catholique International du Cinema
awarded its prize to "TEOREMA". Then withdrew it.
Pasolini was brought to trial on obscenity charges,
and was cleared.The decision was appealed. Another
trial is scheduled.
In New York, the controversy continues. Newsweek
asks whether Pasolini is dealing with "our pursuit of
sexuality is an end in itself"....and the Daily News
wonders if the film isn't saying
that "human sexuality
is the last avenue of
communications.'' ,
Obscene? Erotic? It all
depends, doesn't it? 'l

TONIGHT at 8:00

"ONE OF THE YEAR'S
10 BEST!" -NeVw York Times

THE ACCLAIMED MOTION PICTURE
John Cassavetes' "FACES"

"One of the most
intriguing,
absorbing and
beautifully acted
movies in years.

Sept. 16-Sept. 28, 1969
"The Eeriest Macbeth
Of The Century!"
. A. Tines
SHAKESPEARE'S

RICHARD
EASTON
SADA

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