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September 18, 1969 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-09-18

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, September 19, 1969

TH__HGNDIL rdy etebr1,16

m"

cinema-

Ramsey Clark cites nation ' ills

FOX' EASTEP~I i'.f TS iU
FQX "HVILtaGE
375No MAPLE RD. "769.1300

MON.-FRI.- 7:20 & 9:30
SAT. &SUN.--3
5:10-7:20-9:30

Pick of the litter
By GORMAN BEAUCHAMP
Greta Garbo was the greatest movie star ever, the Mona Lisa
of the silver screen, a woman of incredible, ineffable, elusive
beauty. She was and is a legend. Strangely, however, few of her
films are ever seen perhaps because few were very good. Cinema
Guild in the last couple of years has shown the two best-Camille
and Ninotchka. This week lFri the Guild is presenting her in
Queen Christina, a high class bit of historical soap opera based,
rather loosely I imagine, on the life and loves of the great seven-
tcnth century queen of Sweden. The film was directed by Rouben
Mamoulian, better known, and better, as a stage rather than a
film director. but his comments on directing Garbo (to be found
in an interview in Sarris' Interviews with Directors,
Cinema Guild's other offering (Sat. and Sun.I is Antonioni's
L'Avventura, which, along with Godard's Breathless, is probbly
the most important film of the 60's, important both in itself as well
as for its influence. It was the first in Antonioni's decade-long
exploration of the inner life of modern man, the crisis of faith in
our society. When it was awarded a special Jury Prize at the Cannes
Festival in 1960. a huge uproar followed: the film was denounced
as too difficult, too slow, too enigmate. But L'Avventura taught a
generation a new way of looking at cinema, so that by 1967, in
Blow-up, Antonioni's oblique, elliptical style proved to be com-
mercially quite successful. Seeing L'Avventura now, one may not
be struck by its startling originality as we were then, since it has
been so widely assimilated, but its power and beauty are still over-
whelni g.
Another important and ori-ginal film is John Cassavetes' Faces,
now playing on a double bill with Pasolini's Teorema at the Fifth
Forum. For my money. Faces was the best American film of last
year. The kind of social criticism implicit in Schlesinger's Midnight
Cowboy or Lester's Petulia is surface shallow up against Cassavetes'
revelation of the sterile horror of Levittown living.
The Ark coffee house shows films on Monday nights in an
informal, sit on the floor and smoke atmosphere. Elliot Barden,
head honcho of this venture, follows the enviable policy of booking
films that he wants to see and often hasn't. This Monday he is
showing Don Siegel's Riot in Cell Block 11, an account of a prison-
er's rebellion in Folsom Prison, of Johnny Cash fame. Siegel is an
action-film director, very highly regarded among European cineastes
like Godard. Riot was filmed on location in the prison and stars,
a number of then unknown, now familiar heavies led by Neville
Brand. Siegel's films deal with the down and out, instinctively
anarchi stratum of society and this one presents a violent but
humane look at the jungle world of a modern prison.
Another action-film director highly rated in the 50's, is John
Sturges whose The Great Escape is being shown by Cinema II (Fri.
and Sat.). Struges made a big splash in the early days of Cinema-
scope, but critical reaction long ago set in to his overinflated
reputation and it's hard to imagine why, now, Cinema II is reviving
this film.
The Campus contributing to the rash of reruns in town, is
showing Claude Leluche's elegant soap opera, A Man and a Woman.
This film was a great hit a couple of years back, but, except for its
pastel surface beauty, it has little to recommend it.
The seragly Lion in Winter roars on at the Michigan, soon, it
is hoped, to be put out of its misery. At the Fox Village John Voight
and Dustin Hoffman turn in excellent performances in the poorly
directed Midnight Cowboy, making it a good, if not a great, film.
You will greatly help the cause of discouraging this theatre's
blatant "intermission" policy by boycotting the candy counter: pop
your own and take it with you. I find it impossible to sit through
Sidney Poitier movies anymore so the State's offering of The Last
Man will go unreported in this column-not that it matters much.
You can't argue with success but you can ignore it.
LASER CONCERT
THE VERY LATEST IN ELECTRONIC ENTERTAINMENT
direct from its New York Pre-
miere Showin. See the Sonovi
ion Krypton Loser transform
music into 4 color, full screen
desins.
SONOVISION
Fri- 1:00 PM.
Sat.- 1:00 matinee &
1:00 P.M.
Sun 1:00 matinee &
1:00 P.M.
i FIFI' FORUM 5th at Liberty 761-9700

By DAVE CHUDWIN
Former U.S. Atty. Gen. Ramsey
Clark told how bad things really
are to over 600 people at Hill Aud.
yesterday.
"Our's is a house of many divi-
sions-between "rich and poor,
young and old, educated and un-
educated. and white and black,"
said the former adviser to Presi-
dent Lyndon B. Johnson.
Citing the great changes in
American life since the turn of the
century as the cause of many of
these problems, Clark called on in-
stitutions such as government and
the universities to adapt to today's
conditions.
"What is most important is to
develop techniques of institutional
change," Clark said. "If we don't,
the frustrations built up in this
country will break loose."
Clark listed the population ex-
plosion and advances in science
and technology as the two major
factors in changing world con-
ditions.
"We'll add a billion people in
the next decade and as many as
we have now in 31 years." Clark
explained. "That will affect the
lives of all of us."
Clark noted there are millions
of Americans alive today who re-
member when the first car rolled
into their towns. With a barrage
of statistics he showed the differ-
ences technology has made to
American society.
"Men have come to master na-
ture through science and tech-
nology and now the question is
'whether science and technology
I will conquer man," Clark added.
Noting the fact that the natives
of Alaska have a life expectancy
half that of white Americans.
Clark criticized the unequal dis-
tribution of the benefits.of tech-
nology and began a long list of
America's unsolved problems.
The former attorney general
described large areas of cities
where the average education is six
years, over half the people are un-
employed, most of the housing is
substandard, and people face the
greatest amount of crime.
"The stability of every society
has depended on the resignation
of the poor to being poor," Clark
continued. "I don't think the poor
will remain resigned and I don't
think they should."
Clark said confrontation and
OVL
-,
SEPTEMBER 18, 19
Queen
Christina
Dir. ROUBEN MAMOULIN
1933)
THE GREATEST FACE ON
THE SILVER SCREEN
GRETA GARBO
Be A Patron of Beauty
7 & 9 Architecture
662-8871 Auditorium
8h

-k t po
(lark Iists America' j pr~blemiS

ask me what to do---it 's all around
you." Clark answered. "You have
to be perceptive and concerned
enough to find one specific thing
and work on it.
The former attorney general
evaded a question on Vietnam,
claiming he is just another citizen
without military knowledge.
On the draft issue. Clark called
for a universal service requirement
for all men. "I think the present
draft is incredibly unjust," he
explained.
After high school all males
would be required to serve either
in the army or in some type of
, public service. Clark suggested a
lottery to select those who would
have to enter the military.
Clark said he opposed a pro-
fessional army. "I just don't have
that much confidence in the mili-
tary," he said. "While we have to
have a military we should have a
significant injection of civilians
into it."

m A -. rr~rrr o
STEVE McQUEEN
IN
THE GREAT ESCAPE
"Sherescapism"
-Fromm
"Lies' All Lies"
-Goebbels
SAT.-SUN. at 7 and 9:15
SEPT.2-21 Aud. A . 75c

z
:

dissent 'are necessary to prod
change. Opening communications,
he added, would help to ease some
of the divisions in society.
"I don't know any greater divi-
sion between the educated and the
uneducated than when police
come on campuses." Clark said, to
the applause of the audience.
Clark claimed today's genera-
tion gap is different from those of
previous eras. There have been so

many changes since parents were
in school that the young people
of today are going through a dif-
ferent experience than their
elders. Clark said.
Finishing his speech to polite ap-
plause, Clark attempted to answer
questions from the audience. One
person asked Clark what solutions
he could suggest to solve the mul-
titude of problems mentioned.
"If you care, you don't have to

Clark also avoided a direct re-
sponse to a question on the legal-
ization of marijuana. "I think the
real danger, rather than mari-
juana or even heroin, are chemi-
cal synthetics which can cause
chromosome damage," he said.
Before Clarks appearance, Mike
Farrell of Student Government
Council gave a speech on t h e
student bookstore issue to t h e
crowd. He asked people to attend
a rally today urging the Regents
to approve the bookstore proposal.

MONDAY, SEPT. 29 8:00 P.M.
PIONEER HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM, ANN ARBOR

TICKETS:
$3.00
Advance
$3.25
at
Door

5f t

"Hey listen: change and growth make a fable, but a thing
LEN made of silent demand and visual memory must still have
legs if it is to stand."
"If that's what you want, you may
CHANDLER have it."
-Dream
Tonight thru SADu6nday
330 MANARD 65060

AVAILABLE:
DISCOUNT
RECORDS
Ann Arbor
GRINNELL
BROTHERS
Ypsilanti

7

rr

i

I

FC and PANHEL

{i
f
i

KICK-OUT

EEKE

presents

ID
CERT

i

UNION-LEAGUE
'70

THE

rRST

F

LL

Co

i

USKET

I

fl!

'i

(all campus musical theatre group)

presents

Ill

"GEORGE

MASS MEETING

and

TUESDAY, SEPT. 23rd

I

UNION BALLROOM

7:30 P.M.

THE FOUR TOPS

ROTARY CONNECTION

WE NEED EVERYONE!

Ill

11

11

IIll

11

11

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