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September 16, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-09-16

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Tuesday and Wednesday
The Second Cinema Guild Directors Festival
Richard Myers
1969 Ann Arbor Festival Winner
7:00 Earlier Works
9:00 AKRAN-1969 AA Festival Winner
2 hour feature length
same show both nights
BE A PATRON OF THE ARTS
7 & 9 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 75C AUDITORIUM
-- - - - - -

Fleming
By DAVE CHUDWIN
Disruption of University classes and operations
--for more than a day-is intolerable. President
Fleming said yesterday during a noon discussion
at Guild House.
Speaking bafore a crowd of about 75, Fleming
hinted at his position in the ROTC controversy
-students should have the right to take ROTC
classes if they desire, without fear of harrass-
inent.
"I've said for two years we can't tolerate
force and coercion," Fleming said. "It's one
thing for people to disrupt for one day, it's ano-
ther to keep on doing it," referring to a one-
day take-over of the old Administration Bldg.
by black students in 1968. At that time no
action was taken against the protesters.
Fleming said he favored having compassion
towards people involved in such an emotion-
charged controversy. "You don't handle these
things by repressive actions," he said.
"However, I don't think one group, whether

denounces
majority or minority. can impose its views on
others," Fleming added.
While firm in his opposition to the disrup-
tions, Fleming avoided aking a stand on the
place of ROTC in the University. "After the
faculty has voted, I will state my views." he
explained, referring to the Senate Assembly's cur-
rent study of the University-ROTC relationship.
Fleming then went on to discuss some of the
arguments used by supporters and critics of
ROTC.
Fleming stressed the right of those wanting
to participate in ROTC to do so and the "liberal-
izing" effect of university-trained officers in the
army.
"When you argue about ROTC you have to ask
some basic questions," Fleming began. "The
first question is whether it's necesary to have
an army."
"If we assume thei'e will be an army, then
we will have to staff it," Fleming said. "We could
staff it through the military academies and of-
ficer training schools. Then the entire cadre

disruptions
would come from people who wanted to make killing, Fleming claimed protesters have a one-
a care r of the military. sided view of the situation. "Then we should
"In a democracy isn't it better to have a stop the teaching of chemistry to prevent chem-
significant component of the officer cadre peo- ical warfare,"' he said.
pie who don't consider themselves military men Earlier in his talk, Fleming presented three
and who can exert a liberalizing influence?" possible models of University government but
asked Flemin' dt clin d to say which one he favored.
Fleming insisted he was not giving his own "There is a comnmunity approach with a series
(pinion. "I've just told you what other people of constituencies -- students, faculty, alumni,
say," lie explained.Yet he vigorously defended employes," Fleming explained. "You build a legis-
the "libealizinig" 4hypothesis. ltr ihrpeettvsfo hs osiu
"Unless everybody disarms or we disarm all lature with representatives from these constitu-
by ours v s. we are going to have an army," uncies which makes decisions.
Fleming said. "Is it best to see it staffed by "In the second approach, an individual con-
_Lopi who are essentially civilians or is it better stituency system, you have employees in a trade
to "o the route of a professional army?" union. teachers in a teachers' union, and stu-
When asked whether there would actually be dents in a student union," Fleming said.
such a "liberalizing" effect, Fleming cited his "The third approach is a city council organiza-
own experiences in World War II. tijn," Fleming added. "The Regents are at the
"I spent three and one-half years in the army top with executive officers chosen by search
lnd I don't think there is any question that those ccmmittees.
of its who were civilians exerted an influence," he "The Regents act like a city council," Fleming
a c . said. "Everybody gets his say and there's a
Countering arguments that ROTC teaches mechanism for decision making."

,. . ; ' N E 1 1 7S~~~~~ I P O E 4015.'4eu dl o t Nec -x ti ft U I NE S S P H O N E : 7 6 4 - 0 5 5 41
Tuesday, September 16, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

VERBAL
INTERCOURSE
Talk with us at the
CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL
Office if you are interested in a
position as chairman of:

-

the
n ews today
b') The Assoc fale £1're ' amld (ol/ege Press Seri ire

Mitchell

requests

stiffer

LI TERATURE-JOURNALI SM
DRAMA--CINEMA
TECHNICAL DIRECTOR
COORDINATING ART
PUBLIC RELATIONS
PUBLICITY
TREASURER
SECRETARY
MUSIC
DANCE
ART
TICKETS
USHERS

2nd Floor Union
CAF Office for
info sheet
Interviews
Sept. 23, 24, 25

GOODBYE, BENJAMIN
LAST TIMES TODAY
"THE GRADUATE"
Showas at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
LADIES 75c Until 6 P M.
Program Information Dial
NO 2-6264
STARTS TOMORROW

TILE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES passed a measure
yesterday which would raise by up to 3 per cent annually the
interest banks may receive under the government-guaranteed
student loan program.
The bill, which still must clear the Senate, was made necessary
last spring when the prime interest rate went to 82 per cent and
many banks stopped making student loans at the 7 per cent annual
interest rate precently fixed by law.
Under the present law, the government pays all interest on
these student loans as long as the student is in school and has an
adjusted family income of under $15,000. After graduation, the
student assumes all interest payments.
THE FOOD STAMP PROGRAM will not end with the enact-
ment of the President's proposed income-maintenance welfare
system, two Cabinet secretaries said yesterday.
But, said Agriculture Secretary Clifford Hardin and HEW
Secretary Robert Finch, the program will be transferred from the
Agriculture Department to the Department of Health, Education
and Welfare if the administration welfare proposals are enacted by
Congress.
THE COMMON MARKET will hold a summit meeting in
November on the entry of Great Britain and other candidates,
it was announced yesterday.
The meeting will take place in The Hague. November 17-18.
Besides Britain, Ireland, Denmark, Norway and Sweden wish
to be considered for Common Market membership.
Observers report that the prospects of Britain's joining the
Common Market have been considerably improved because of the
resignation of French President DeGualle five months ago. DeGualle
'vetoed British entry twice in five years.
SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MELVIN LAIRD released guide-
lines yesterday for dealing with political protest within the mili-
tary.
The guidelines reflect the Defense Department's increasing con-
cern with GI-published protest newspapers, radically-oriented GI
coffee houses and GI involvment in protest demonstrations.
"The service member's right of expression should be preserved
to the maximum extent possible, consistent with good order and
discipline and the national security," said Laird in a new police
directive.
"On the other hand," the directive continues, "no commander
should be indifferent to conduct which, if allowed to proceed un-
checked, would destroy the effectiveness of his unit."
SOME 4,000 DEMONSTRATORS marched peacefully through
downtown Pittsburgh yesterday, demanding more jobs for blacks
in craft unions there.
The Black Construction Coalition which organized the march.
has been negotiating with the Master Builders Association and the
Building Trades Council since Labor Day, when ten construction sites
were closed by demonstrations. The talks, aimed at getting more
blacks into the construction industry, have not satisfied the march
leaders. w
Blacks comprise 23% of Pittsburgh's population. but they con-
stitute less than one per cent of the membership in the city's skilled
craft unions.
THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION came out in opposition
yesterday to a House bill which would establish criminal penalties
for those attempting to supply NLF forces and disrupt American
military activities.
The proposed legislation. said Administration officials. is unnec-
essary since laws already exist against the effective aiding of enemies,
as well as disruption of U.S. troop and supply movements.
The officials told a House subcommittee on internal security that
efforts by war protestors along these lines have so far had no meas-
urable impact on troop morale or effectiveness.
The proposed bill, authored by Rep. Charles Bennett (D-Fla.)
would set a maximum $20,000 fine and 20 year jail term for furnish-
ing money or supplies to a combat enemy, and a maximum $10,000
fine and five year jail term for interfering with movement of Ameri-
can troops or supplies.
THE STATE DEPARTMENT announced yesterday that it
will extend existing restrictions on travel by Americans to China,
Cuba, North Korea and North Vietnam for another six months.
The State Department action did not countermand the loosening
of American restrictions on travel to China which was announced in
July. The Department will validate the passports of journalists, sch-
olars, and certain other categories of travellers.
KICK-OUT
IFC-PAN HEL PRESENTS
DA CEV f0I ADII

laws

to combat

drug9use
'No knock'
tr entry asked
-WASHINGTON (, - Attorney
General John Mitchell set n e w
legislative goals yesterday in the
administration's battle to dry up
the 'sources of drugs it claims are
threatening to corrupt vast num-
bers of the nation's youth.
Mitchell's request for new and
tough erlegal weapons followed
closely the Justice Department an-
nouncement that large-scale mea-
sures are being taken to halt the
flow of drtgs--especially marl-
juana-across the U.S.-Mexican
border.
In testimony before a Senate
juvenile delinquency subcommit-
tee, Mitchell and senators present
appeared to agree a triple stand-
ard of legal penalties is needed
to match punishment to crime.
The proposed law would differ-
entiate between the professional
criminal at the top of the drug-
distribution pyramid, the d r u g
addict, and the increasing thous-
ands of casual, youthful experi-
nmenters in drugs.
It would set also some kind of
first-offender provision which -
soiated Press for casual drug users - would
eliminate the long mandatory jail
terms now in force for the us of
such non-addictive drugs as mari-
failure of the juana.
But it would stiffen other sec-
tions of existing law, tighten regu-
lations on the manufacture and
distribution of drugs, and, at least
in one instance, create a new
police weapon - the no-knock
in011r narcotics raid.
Mitchell gave this explanation
of the no-knock raid which would,
T he said, require prior judicial ap-
S/ proval:
' "All too frequently, violators are
able to destroy contraband drugs
g 100,COO Ut.S while officers with a search war-
gnam by the end; rant are going through the pres-
11 ground forces en tly required process of knock-
ext year. Nixon n and announcing theirauth-
hat time: ority and purpose."
many will be Testifying on sentences for drug
end of this year, abusesMitchell, who said the
t year, I would medical profession regards mari-
d beat Mr. Clif juana as nonaddictive a n d less
dangerous than LSD, called for
Nixon had an- flexibility, "Prison is not the only
al troop pullout logical alternative," he said.
was completed "In some cases, it may be advis-
r 40,500 by the able to use federal rehabilitation
r would leave programs, half-way houses a n d
drawn by year's private medical treatment on pro-
total were to be- bationior' parole.'
He said that perhaps the most
promising alternative is to ap-
ound a question proach the narcotics violator in
nnouncemnent of relation to his function: The pro-
of troop with- fessional dealer w h o should be
. . c given as severe a sentence as pos-
ewed as indica- sible: the casual and intermittent
oward peace. user who is perhaps only experi-
menting out of curiosity: or the
mentally or physically ill addict
annually claim- who, without additional help can-
Michigan. not break a confirmed habit.

-As=
Some 4,000 demonstrators march in downtown Pittsburgh yesterday, protesting the i
city's construction industry to hire substantial numbers of black workers.
ANNOUIN'EIENT T-ODAY:
1Ixon to Wlthdraw 40,500
Ky predicts 2000out I-

A UNIVERSAL PICTURE /TECHNICOLOR' PANAVISION' [
KICK-OUT
IFC-PAN-HEL PRESENTS
FIRST FALL WEEKEND: 9-18-20 '69

WASHINGTON - President
Nixon has ordered a second pull-
out of U.S. troops from Vietnam
and the total of men involved
will be announced by the White
House this morning.
Signs on both sides of the
Pacific point' to a withdrawal of
40.500.men between now and
Nov. 30.
That was the figure and the
date mentioned yesterday in Sai-
gon by Vietnamese Vice President
Nguyen Cao Ky. They went un-
challenged by presidential press
secretary Ronald L. Ziegler later
in the day when he announced
the presidential decision to be de-
tailed today.
Saigon already had been in-
formed of the Nixon decision,
The U.S. commander in Viet-
nam, Gen. Creighton W. Abtrams,
flew back across the Pacific fol-
lowing a top-drawer conference
of military, diplomatic and intel-
ligence experts at the White
House Friday. He immediately ad-
vised President Nguyen Van Thieu

of Viemmamn of the presidential
decision.
Ziegler said Nixon actually had'
made up his mind late last week,
prior to the Friday session.
Exact figures were held up un-
til today while the allies who also
have forces in Vietnam were con-'
stilted and informed. Ziegler said
this process was being coml>leted
yesterday.
The other nations involved are
Australia, New Zealand, the Phi-
lippines, South Korea and Thai-
land.
Looking ahead to 1970. Ky pro-
jectedi acutback of U.S. troops
in Vietnam that would reach a
total between 150,000 and 200,000
by the end of next year-probably
the latter. Ziegler did not go into
this.
No' would he say anything
about a third withdrawal. But he
stood pat on what Nixon said at
his latest news conference on June
19 when he voiced a hope for up-
ping the ante of former Secretary
of Defense Clark M. Clifford.
Clifford had called in a magazine

article for getting
troops out of Vietr
of this year and a
by the end of n
told reporters at t
"As far as how
withdrawn by theE
by the end of nex
hope that we coulfo ds t m ta l .
fo d'st tm table
When he spoke,
mounced the initia
of 25,000, which
in August.. Anothe
end of Novembe
34,500 to be with
end if Clifford's t
bettered.
Ziegler talked ar
whether today's a
the second stage
drawals can be vi
tive of p'ogress t
In 1882 typhoid
ed 1,000 victims in

RAMSEY CLARK

PEP RALLY

Thurs. 8 P.M.
Hill Aud, $1
Friday
7:30 P.M.
East Univ.
Saturday
After Game

MIXER

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GAME
OPEN HOUSES

WINNER ! 3ACADEMY AWARDS
INCLUDING BEST ACTRESS KATHARINE HEPBURN
NOW SHOWING WEDNESDAY
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DIAL 8-6416
Tonight at
7 and 9 P.M.

FUOR
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Vrl n im(

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