100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 12, 1969 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, September 12, 1969

Pag S!1 THE111 M ICHIGA:N. .. .D-I---Y

WARMEST GOOD WISHES FOR THE NEW YEAR
from
Beth Israel Congregation
If you're still feeling strange in town, come join Beth Israel.
Worship, informal study groups, new friends. Membership might
be just the thing to make this a happier, richer year. Call 665-9897
for the opportunities most suited to you.
1429 Hill Street
Ann Arbor
JUDO DEM ONSiTLRATION
THE YM-YWCA JUDO CLUB
WILL PRESENT THEIR
FIFTH ANNUAL DEMONSTRATION
Friday, Sept. 12, 1969 8:00 P.M.
AT THE
YM-YWCA-350 South Fifth Ave.
The demonstration will illustrate what Judo
is, self-defense techniques and Olympic style competition.
at COLONIAL LANES
1950 S. Industrial highway
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT every Friday and Saturday night
Cocktails, Dining. Music starts at 9:30 p m. Saturday
10:30p.m. Sunday
This week featuring:
BROWNSVILLE STATION
_ ____-f_ - -

Gridders out to get kicks

By ERIC SIEGEL
FIRST QUARTER
Captain Rokusek of Illinois won
the toss and chose to defend the
north goal. Captain Steger kick-
ed off to Grange who received the
ball on the ten yard line and raced
the entire length of the field for a
ouchdown. The ire Michigan
tean stood between Grange and the
goal line but failed to grab the
elusive Illini back before hie had
tle entire field to himself.
-The Michigan Daily
Saturday, Oct. 18, 19i24
The kickoff return.
One of the most exciting, ex-
plosive plays in football. A play
that can put six points on the
scoreboard within seconds after
the opening whistle blows, or{
equalize an opponent's score al-
most as quickly as you can say
"The Victors."
Fortunately, the Wolverines do

not have to kick off to Red Grange
anymore .The spectre of the le-
gendary Illini halfback will not,
it can be safely said, rise and run
on the Michigan Stadium turf this
year.
The absence of Grange does not
mean, however, that the Wolver-
ines' kickoff unit will be able to
relax. "Every team we face has at
least one good kick return man,"
head football coach Bo Schem-
bechler asserted.
"There's Al Matthews of Van-
derbilt and Harvey Blanks of
Washington," Schembechler con-
tinued. "Missouri has two or three
outstanding kick return men, and
Purdue has a couple. The list goes
on and on."
Kicking off against this long list
of capable kick return men will
be a unit that is, in the words of
Schembechler, "a big question
mark.
"We don't scrimmage kickoffs
and punts very much," the head
grid mentor explained. "There'sj
too much danger in open field
running. We won'tireally know
what sort of downfield coverage
we're capable of until the open-
ing game."
The Wolverines held their first
- and so far their only -- kick-
ing scrimmage of the year Wed-
nesday. The problem with the
scrimmage wasn't with the down-
field coverage, though - it was
with the kicking itself.
"Mark) Werner was my punter
until I saw him out there today,"
Schembechler said after Wednes-
day's practice session, showing
obvious disappointment with the
Cincinnatti senior's performance.
Despite Schembechler's disap-
pointment with Werner, however,
it appears that Werner will be
Bo 's punter- at least during the
first part of the season. Schemn-
bechler has been trying split end
Paul Staroba, who has n e v e r
kicked the pigskin before, as a
punter. But, as Schembechler
says, "Staroba needs a lot of
wor'k."
Mike Hankwitz will probably
handle the kickoff chores for the
Wolverines, with sophomore Dana
Coin also vying for the honor to
boot the ball off the tee.
Hankwitz booted some long
kicks in p~ractice this week, and
also practiced a couple of onside
kicks during the scrimmage, one

MIark

Jr eraser

Tint Killin

I

SOUP KITCHEN
Cheap and Friendly
Soup- 25c
Rolls-5-10c
M-F-1 1 :30-1 :30
Canterbury House
330 Maynard

of which was recovered by the
defense. Schembechler calls the
onside kick "a heck of a weapon"
Despite the presence of speedy
kick return men of their oppo-
sition's roster, the Wolverines
have not restricted their practice
drills to the defensive side of the
kicking game.
"We practice place kicking every
day." Schembechler revealed.
"The field goal is an important
part of the offensive weapon and
an important part of our game."
Tim Killian handled the place-
kicking duties for the Wolverines
last season, and is back again this
year. Senior Frank Titas is also
available for field goal and extra
point kicking.
The Wolverines, perhaps hoping
for a few Red Grange-like per-
formances of their own this sea-
son, have also been working on
kick returns. Offensive backs
Lance Scheffler, Preston Henry
and Glenn Doughty and defensive
Imen Barry Pierson and B r i a n
Hlealy are the top candidates to
"go deep" for the Wolverines.
The rest of the kick return unit,
like the kickofftand punt teams,
is in a general state of flux. "We
have no specialty teams as such,'
according to Schembechler. "Ev-
eryone learns a position and we'll
go with out best elevens in game
situations." Recent practices have
seen such standouts as Jim Man-,
dich and Jerry Imsland on the
front line of the kick return
squads.
Blocking patterns are set before
the kick, Schembechler said, and
every team has two or three pat-
terns that they use. For example,
on kickoff returns, the Wolverines
might use a cross block pattern,
with the front men crossing the
field to block potential downfield
tacklers from the side; a wedge,
where the linemen drop back in
front of a back; or a trap play,
where two blockers try to box a
defensive man in from the side.
No matter what the kicking un-
it.s -- offensive or defensive - do,
however, chances are the kick re-
turns will be longer this year.
"Yes, there'll probably be longer
returns this year because of the
'ur'f." Schembechler' said.
Red Grange may ride again, af-
ter' all.
It should be exciting, anyway.
INTELLECTUAL
CHALLENGE?
CHESS
Fridays :30pm.
ANN ARBOR YMCA

Graff it I
wien J Jo e Marker
The Chicago Cubs ...
... the choke is on
Another in a long series of collapses of professional baseball
teams seems to be unfolding before our very eyes. The Chicago
Cubs, who only a week ago had the National League's Eastern
Division pennant locked up, have incredibly lost seven games
in a row and in the process lost the league lead to the surging
New York Mets.
On September 4, the Cubs were perched in first place with
an 84-52 record, while the Mets at the same time were wallow-
ing in second place at 77-56, or 5%2 games behind. The race
seemed a lock for the Cubs at this point, especially when one
considers the team's personnel and its season-long performance.
HERE WAS A TEAM that had been the scourge of the Na-
tional League for nearly the entire campaign. The Wrigleys
(as the Cubs are affectionately designated in the Chicago news-
papers) had destroyed the prohibitive pre-season favorites, St.
Louis, in two four-game series.
Personnel-wise, they are unequalled t except by, perhaps, the
defunct Cardinals). They have solid starting pitchers, good re-
lief pitchers (in the tireless arms of Phil Regan and Ted Ab-
ernathy), and what may be the best infield in baseball.
NOW TO RETURN to Sept. 4. In view of their superior
personnel, the momentum of a superior season-long perform-
ance, and their 5-game lead, only the most confirmed Mets'
optimist (but aren't all Mets fans blind optimists?) could dare
have even the faintest thread of hope.
Even if the Cubs were to do so poorly as to break even at
13-13 in their remaining games they would finish at 97-65. The
Mets would have to finish 20-9 to even tie for the title.
WITH THEIR INVINCIBILITY at this point established.
the Cubs have turned right around and done the impossible -
lost their insurmountable lead in the space of a week. All the
elements of a full-scale choke are there. The pitching has gone
sour and things are happening that shouldn't happen on a ma-
jor league baseball diamond. For instance, last Tuesday night
Glenn Beckert, certainly an All-Star calibre second-baseman.
dropped a throw and allowed the Mets' Art Shamsky to escape
a run-down. Moments later, Don Clendenon belts a two-run
homer and the Mets go on to win.
The choke is an interesting phenomenon. There is no ex-
planation of its beginning. However, its continuance is explain-
able. A team loses, and panics as it watches its lead disappear.
The more it loses, the more it panics, the more it loses, etc., etc.,
and the choke goes on.
(Now this isn't to imply that the Cubs can't rebound - one
lucky break can snap the vicious circle of losing and panicking.
Itkiskto imply that they probably won't rebound, at least not un-
til they return to Wrigley Field, where their fanatical entourage
may provide the psychological climate in which they can break
the cycle).
BASEBALL IS a game requiring precise a n d unnatural
physical movements. Scooping up a ground ball, pivoting to
complete a double play, or hitting a sphere traveling at 90 mph
require unusual co-ordination and more importantly, complete
concentration and relaxation.
Thus an unrelaxed team, even though its personnel are of
very high calibre, almost invariably plays lousy bMl. A first-place
team that loses a couple of games certainly is not relaxed, es-
pecially if its lead is being whittled away. Ergo, the obvious
conclusion.
In contrast, a football or hockey team that suffers a loss
can rebound by venting its spleen against the next opponent.
These are two sports where anger and violence can work for a
team; baseball is not.
IN ADDITION, the recovery period for a baseball team is
very short. After a loss, the team does not have a week to re-
group. Frequently it is called upon to play the next day follow-
ing a night game (worse yet is the second game of a double-
header. The team frequently takes into a game the memory
of yesterday's nightmare; certainly this has a detrimental effect,
on its relaxation and concentration.
For example, the Cubs last week lost a series to Pittsburgh
in Wrigley Field, and then had to face the surging Mets in New
York, where they lost both games. Last night they dropped a
game to the horrendous Phillies, a team they should be able to
handle without using theirgloves. All this happened with the
Cubs not having a day off in the last week. Clearly they are not
now the same players who have devastated the National League
the whole season -- they are a team in disarray.

i

RAD TE

G

FRIDAY, SEPT 12

UNION-LEAGUE
CALENDAR NOTEBOOKS
ARE NOW AVAILABLE AT:
E FOLLETTS
+ MICHIGAN PHARMACY
0 MICHIGAN UNION
4 MORRILL'S
" OVERBECK'S
0 SLATERS
0 STUDENT BOOK SERVICE
* ULRICHS
0 WAHR'S

4:30 to

7:30

P.M.

BAITS TENNIS COURTS
NORTH CAMPUS
Featuring
"FRANCIS X and THE BUSHMEN"

STUDENT SALES:
* ON DIAG
* NEAR ENGINEERING ARCH

0

$1.25

UNIV. ACTIVITIES ARE LISTED
UNIV. PHONES NOS.
SPORTS SCHEDULES

WvUTelcome Back Students!
DON'T MISS OUR
SPECIAL COLLEGE NIGHT
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15

BOOK SALE

FREE

CAR

WASH

Saturday,

September
8:'00-5:.00

13

(Exterior Only)
(with Fill up over 13 gals.)

1st Congregational
608 E. William

Church

_____ _ _ . _._____ . _ _ _..- _ f
r

Price of
Exterior Wash

Price of'
Full Service Wash
Without gas . . . . . . . $2.25

UNION-LEAGUE
PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE

Without gas .. .
With Fill up over

N

-

13 gals.
10 gals.
8 gals. .
6 gals. .

s " r a
" " i 1
r r " s
r s s

.. . $1.35
. . . . Free
. . . . . 49c
.. ..79c
s . $1.09

With Fill up over

15 gals.
12 gals.
10 gals.
6 gals. .

i i " " i " " i "
# " " i "
" i " " " K i

. 49c
$1.09
$1.49
$1.89

* WRITING
" DESIGNING
* PUBLISHING
* SELLING ADVERTISING
o PHOTOGRAPHY

NEEDS
IN:

PEOPLE INTERESTED

Wax '15c extra

Wax .3a etr

I : " I iv,; Elm= V J':N',JW ANW 11

YvUA -) J '7 It I III Y V U A J-P.. 4 RAIL

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan