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May 20, 1967 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-05-20

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SATURDAY, MAY 20, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNFLOWER, MISSISSIPPI:
Pro ile of a Southern Election

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 764-0557
Monday through Friday, 1 P.M. to 3 P.M.

FOR RENT

By ROGER RAPOPORT
Editor
SUNFLOWER, Miss. - A first
glance at the Mississippi road-
map is hardly encouraging. Not
° that there's anything wrong with
the highways. Despite its rugged
states-rightism, Mississippi ap-
pears more than willing to grab
its share of the dole for federally
financed (90 per cent) super
highways.
Rather there are these names
of obscure little towns that seem
hauntingly familiar even though
you've never been near them be-
fore: Oxford, Philadelphia, Her-
nando, Greenwood, Grenada, Bel-
zoni, and McComb . . . They're
the infamous datelines that have
been crowding the papers over
the past few years: James Mere-
dith trying to get into the Uni-
versity at Oxford, Schwerner,
Chaney and Goodman murdered
n e a r Philadelphia; Hernando
where Meredith was shot-up last
summer, Greenwood where Byron
4 DeLabeckwith, accused murderer
of Edgar Evers lives on-the ex-
amples are endless.
But since I had just gotten a
haircut and was dressed like a
salesman (tie, jacket etc.) and
there was no indication that I
was working for the civil-rights
't press (the Southern Courier had
been bind enough to let me join
their staff for a few weeks) the
ride was uneventful. Indeed a
touch of gas station drawl "Wud
ya'all fillerup," seemed to work
wopders.
The drive from Montgomery in
4 central Alabama into mid-Missis-
sippi offers a look at lush farm-
land and pine forests. Heading
northwest from Jackson, Miss.
into the delta country the land
turns into a table flat alluvial
plain-perfect for cotton growing.

Sunflower, a town of 500 about
100 miles north of Jackson, is not
one of Mississippi's infamous lit-
tle towns. Aside from being five
miles from Senator. James East-
land's 5,900 acre plantation the
city has been relatively undis-
tinguished. .
7[WO WEEKS AGO, however,
Sunflower was in the lime-
light because of the local elec-
tions being held there. Thanks to
the 1965 Voter Registration Act,
Negro voters outnumbered whites
194-160. The elections were being
held under orders from'the feder-
al courts which had voided 1965
municipal elections here and in
nearby Moorehead because Ne-
groes were not given enough time
to get on the voting rolls.
Sunflower tells the story of po-
verty in rural Mississippi by it-
self. Most of the white homes are
scattered around 'the fringes,
while the Negroes live in a com-
pact ghetto that resembles an
abandoned army camp.
Except that people live in the
dingy shacks, which suffer from
a lack of paint. It had rained
heavily the day before and the
next day's scorching 90 degree
heat literally baked the rickety
wood frames.
Virtually the entire Negro com-
munity was crowded into the
main street of the Negro section
the morning of the election. For
weeks civil rights organizers had
been concentrating on getting out
the vote for an all Negro Free-
dom Democratic Party slate for
mayor and five alderman seats.
More than $5,000 had been rai-
sed in campaign contributions by
a National Committee for ' Free
Elections In Sunflower which in-
cluded such diverse luminaries as
Stokely Carmichael, John Ken-

neth Galbraith, and Harry Gold-
en. Top civil-rights attorneys
were on the scene. There had ev-
en been FDP classes to instruct
functionally illiterate voters how
to mark ballots. Pupils took tests
on sample ballots and were grad-
ed.
Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamner, the
famed FDP leader who lived in
nearby Rueville was one of the
or2anizers scouring the town and
getting out the vote. "Brother,"
she told one Negro man, "The
time has come for you to get
down there and tell the white
man you ain't going to let him
push you around no more."
Young FDP leaders checked off
their lists of registered Negro vo-
ters and by 12 noon all but a
handful had voted at the town's
tiny city hall.
But the voting didn't go exact-
ly as planned. Until 6:30 p.m. the
night before the election, the
FDP lawyers had an informal
agreement with the city to allow
a Negro pollwatcher help Negroes
mark their ballots. But at the
last minute the election commis-
sioners decided to let only white
pollwatche~rs help.
As a result the FDP leaders
feared that many semi-literate
Negroes ha~d spoiled their ballots
rather than asktassistance from
a white pollwatcher. Then too,
some of the 27 Negroes who did
get assistance from white poll-
watchers didn't vote stiaight FDP
for fear of reprisals.
There had also been threats
made against Negro voters. The
day before the election Negroes
received an unsigned mimeo-
graphed letter suggesting that
"if you are smart you will not be
niis-lead (sic) by paid radical
agitgtors who would promise you
everything and give you nothing
but misery if they succeed in
fooling you into following their
leadership . . . Your homes and
property are at stake and we had
better think seriously about thisj
when we vote."
The letter also suggested to
Sunflower's Negroes, 70 per cent,
of whom are unemployed except
during the three-month cotton
season, that "everything you own
is at stake." Some of the employed
Negroes claim that they were in-,
formally threatened with losing
their jobs if the FDP slate won.
DESPITE OUTWARD optimism,
on the part of FDP leaders theret
was a fear that "Uncle Toms
would cost us the election." Ex-
plained one organizer, "These
people have been living under the
white man all their lives. Some
of them are happy just to be able
to put in their 12 hour day for $31
and continue eating."
But many of the Negroes said
they had had their fill of working1
from can to can't ("from whenj
you can see at 6 a.m. to when you
can't see at sundown," explains
one Negro) chopping cotton. t
While the educational creden-
tials of the ]Negro candidates weret

not impressive (one candidate,
Elvin Gibson, never was able to
attend school because he had to
stay at home to care for his little
brothers and sisters) all seemed
familiar with community needs
and offered sound platform points.
For example 63-year-old Annie
Mae King made a major point of
her plan to bring industry to the
area. The Negroes believe that if
they can bring industry into town
they can help end some of their

FOUR ROOM APT, on residential
street, with garage, near campus, rea-
sonable, graduate couple. Call after
5, 668-8554. C46
MOD. 2-MAN APT. has opening for 1
man until end of spring half term.
Call 761-3895 for information. C45
DIVISION-Near Packard. Living room,
kitchen, private bath, furnished.
Available immediately. NO 2-2230.
C40
BURNS PARK-1 bedroom furnished,
professional or grad students only.
NO 8-6906. C38
PRIVATE OFFICES

economic subservience to white Reception room, toilet typewriter, of-
ficetfurn. 260 sq. ft. State St.-LCberty.
plantation owner's. 665-3330.- C44

But in the minds of some Negr
voters the white incumbents haC
the edge on civic experience.
All these factors went into th
voting which was largely complet-
ed by 1 p.m. During the rest o
the hot afternoon the Negroe
talked and joked among them-
selves. Across the town's main-
street a group of white townsmer
were also talking and joking, al-
though in a bit more nervou
fashion. Some of the whites haC
shotguns sitting ominously in the
back windows of their cars.
During the late afternoon re-
porters gathered their stories, Ne-
groes kept their fingers crosseC
and visiting big shots munched or
fried chicken. W. Eugene Groves
President of the National Studeni
Association was even in town an
spent most of his time fending of
insults about the Central Intelli-
gence Agency.
By suppertime civic officials de-
cided to reduce local tension b3
moving th Negro community tc
the ramshackle community cente
and wait out the votes. Enthusi-
asm was high but about 8:30 p.m
the results were announced: in-
cumbent Mayor W. L. Pattersor
had easily defeated his Negrc
opponent 190-121 and the white
aldermen candidates also swept tc
victory.
MAYOR PATTERSON made a
long speech at city hall and attri-
buted his re-election to "all my
Negro friends who crossed over
and voted for me." Much as the
civil rights forces hated to admit
it, he was probably right.
As Percy Sutton, the Negro
borough president of Manhattan
and a booster of the slate told
Sunflower's Negroes "We didn't
stick together. We talked one way
and voted another." ,
In the aftermath FDP lawyers
announced their plans to file a
court suit (they did last week)
contesting the results of the elec-
tion because of the failure to
allow a Negro pollwatcher to assist
illiterate Negro voters.
And FDP organizers announced
plans to mobilize for the county-
wide election this fall. But they
face an uphill battle since only 24
per cent of the Sunflower County
Negroes are registered, compared
with 85 per cent of the eligible
whites. The FDP has tried unsuc-
cessfully to get a federal registrar
to come to the county. They con-
tend no pollwatcher has been as-
signed by the Department' of
Justice partially because the
Chairman of the Senate Judiciary
Committee is Sen. Eastland. (By
the end of 1965, 43 per cent of
eligible Negroes in counties hav-
ing federal registrars were regis-
tered compared with 15 per cent
in counties without federal regis-
trars).
THUS THE FUTURE for Sun-
flower's Negroes does not look es-
pecially bright. More and more
have begun moving away-Negro
voter registration in the town fell
from about 225 last fall to 194
this spring. Only a wide voter reg-
istration majority - which they
apparently will not get in the
near future - could change the

FEMALE TO SHARE plush, modern
apt. Own bedroom. Pleasant sur-
rounding. 10-min. from campus by
car. Rent $77/mo. Phone 663-4585
after 6 p.m. C
TWO GIRLS NEED 1 o' more room-
mates for the fall. 761-7775. Ask for
Debby. C42
SINGLE ROOM for girl. Clean and at-
tractive. Share kitchen and bath.
$45/mo. Summer only.761-5113. C37
WORKING GIRL to share modern 2
bedroom apt, with one other. No
lease, swimming pool. $80/mo, Call
761-5416. C22
NEEDED-3 men for 3 bdrm. house on
campus. June 1st occupancy. 663-1049.
C36
AVAILABLE FOR FALL-2 bdrm. apts.
$190. For information call 665-9405.
C29
Brand New for Fall
Bi-Level
Albert Terrace
f
1700 GEDDES
For 4 or 5 people. Ann Arbor's most
luxurious and beautifully designed
apts. Dishwasher, 2 air conditioners.
All G.E. appliances. Bath and a half,
fully carpeted and professionally dec-
orated. Select your apt, now and have
a choice of colors.
CHARTER REALTY
1335 S. University
665-8825
C35
418 E. washington Street
WASH I NGTON
MANOR .
ON CAMPUS-NR. FRIEZE. &
ANGELL HALL
We are now leasing for fall 1967
DELUXE & SPACIOUS 1 BEDROOMS
FOR 3 STUDENTS. Fully furnished
in modern decorator colors, bal., air-
cond., disposals, soundproof, laundry,
strrage. EXTRA FEATURES - Large
study hall and a very quiet building,
For appt. call NO 8-6906.
Cll
CAMPUS-Hill and Forest area. Singles
for men, $10/wk. Free linen, parking,
refrigerator, TV. Call 761-1743, 3-11
p.m. C25
AVAILABLE NOW - Furnished 1-bed-
room new apt., Has living room, din-
nette, kitchenette, shower. Many ex-
tra efficiency features. Summer rental
$125 including utilities with option
to re-rent for fall. Vicinity E. Kings-
ley and Main. Phone 761-2030. U16
SUMMER RENTAL avail. now-Aug. 20.
Two bedroom apts. (new bldg.), $100-
$150 per month. For info call 665-
9405. 028
3 SINGLE ROOMS. I double plus use
of kitchen for men for summer. 841
E. University. Phone a.m. 764-1546,
p.m. 662-7295 to see. C19

SUMMER SUBLET
ONE GIRL WANTED to share great
house July-August. Own bedroom.
Fall option. Call 665-8741. C34
SUBLET-Apt. for one or preferably
married couple. July and Aug. with
option for fall. 2 blocks from central
campus. 665-8378. U36
FEMALE TO SHARE plush, modern
apt. Own bedroom. Pleasant sur-
roundings. 10-min. from campus by
car. Rent $77/mo. Phone 663-4585
after 6 p.m. U
SUBLET for 2nd Summer Term-Large
modern 4-man apt. Close to campus,
free a/c and parking, sundecks. 663-
5663. U33
SUMMER SUBLET-Modern attractive
furnished bi-level and efficiency apts.
for 1-3 persons. Air cond., parking,
laundry facilities. Option to rent for
fall. Also one 2-bdrm. apt. for 3 or 4.
Call NO 3-8866. U31
MALE ROOMMATE wanted. June 1-
August 20. One spot in a 4-man, two-
bedroom apt. New building, nice and
quiet neighborhood. Contact Luis
Saldana at 764-3150 from 8-5 or 764-
8857 evenings and weekends. 1337
Wilmot St., Apt. 8. U34
Summer,
Sublet
761-8055 and 665-2689
U15
Bi-Level
ON CAMPUS - Air-conditioned, dish-
washer, 2 bedrooms for 3 or 4 people.
Reasonable. Several other possibilities
still available for 1st and 2nd sum-
mer terms. Call 665-8825.

PERSONAL
MOTOR CYCLE RENTALS
Suzuki Cycle Center
4040 Arborland-east of
Arborland towards Ypsilanti
F20
ANN ARBOR'S finest in Diamonds-
reasonably priced. Austin Diamonds,
1209 S. University, 663-7151. F9
AIR CONDITIONER - Best offer over
$40. Call 662-1572. kF19
TENOR SEEKS PIANIST interested in
lieder for fun. Call John Bennett,
663-4052, evenings. F18
STROBE LIGHTS-662-2769. 1215 S.
.University, Apt. 4. F
RALLYE-ECONOMY RUNta
Sunday, May 21st; 11:30 a.m. Starts
behind Arborland Marathon Station.
Sponsored by the Sports Car Club
of Ann Arbor. $3.00 per car. F16
RENT Your TV from NEJAC
Zenith 19 in. all channel portables for
only $10 per month. FREE service and
delivery. Phone 662-5671. F
NERVOUS? Learn self-help. Recovery,
Inc., Box 231, Ann Arbor. GL 3-0327,
F
ESCORT SERVICE
Girls!!! we will escort you to your
destination enjoyably and safely. Call
any time: 662-8225, ask for Dave,
Steve, Al, or Mert for a protected
journey on those dark nights and
shady days. FE
4TH ROOMMATE needed to share mod.
2 bdrm, apt. Air-cond., furnished, one
block from campus.
SUMMER TERM ONLY
Call 761-6558 or drop by 715 Church,
No. 10. FE
WAKE-UP SERVICE-Have your phone
ring at any designated time-day or
night-LOW RATES. DON'T BE LATE
FOR CLASS OR WORK - AGAIN.
TELEPHONE ANWSERING SERVICE,
665-8871 (24 hours). F
HELP WANTED
DO YOU WANT to summer on a lake
in Harbor Springs, Mich.? Family
with 4 children would like a student
sitter from late June-mid August.
Prefer girl who enjoys outdoor ac-,
tivities and has had some experience
with children. Own room. $40/wk.
Phone 662-5353. H30
NEED MONEY? Can you sell? We
need college representatives. Quality
Sportswear, Box 1345, Lincoln, Ne-
braska. H24

YAMAHA 80cc-Low mileage. Cal
1321.
SUZUKI 150cc, eight months
Perfect condition, maintalne
mechanic, always garaged. Very
very reliable. Luggage rack and
met included. $395. Call 66
weekdays 9-5, weekends and eve
761-3383,
HONDA 1966, 90cc. step-through n
600 miles, helmets included.
offer. 662-2748.
1966 SUZUKI X-6. Red, 250cc,
4600 miles, exc. cond. $600. See
afternoons at Suzuki Shop ox
971-1510; evenings 665-6756.
MUST SELL-BMW 1954, 500cc.
$500 takes. 761-5935.
SUPERHAWK '63, like new. Don't
for less. 662-3910.
1966 50cc CYCLE-Mint cond.
Only 200 miles. Senior grad mus
668-6620.
S-90 HONDA, 1966. 2400 miles.
761-2774.
1965 HONDA 5-65, in good running
dition, 6100 miles, with helmet
Must sell this week, leaving
Call 761-6070.
1967 175cc KAWASAKI with el
starter, oil injection, tops out
80 mph, much less than comps
sizes. Call 668-6236 or 761-6070.
NORTON ATLAS '64 built-up,
condition. Call 761-6405 after
p.m.
ONLY FIVE DOLLARS MORE
Courtesy
Integrity
Intelligence
Variety
National motorcycle prices
Standard parts prices
Flat rate labor cost
Professional competance
Professionally trained mechanics
Years of experience
Prompt one day service
Guaranteed work"
After-sale service
Honda warranty good at any
authorized dealer
Free unlimited parking
New fresh stock
Motorcycles are our only busines
Only the best for the nicest peo
HONDA OF ANN ARBOR
3000 Packard at Platt
665-9281
FOR SALE-'65 Yamaha 80. Exo. n
cond., sound transportation
cover and straps. $190 br bargair
at 665-8722 after 5 p.m.
NICHOLSON M/O SALES
Authorized dealer for TRIUMP
YAMAHA - BWM - GILERA
S. First. Phone 662-7409.
DOWNTOWN HONE
CAMPUS LOCATION
SALE -SALE--SAL

BIKES AND SCOOT

CHARTER REALTY
1335 S. University
U30
WANTED TO RENT
MALE GRADUATE student wants to
share apartment June 20-Sept. 1.
Write H. T. Reynolds, 4 Barclay Road,
Chapel Hill, N.C. 27514. L11
FEMALE GRAD wishes to sublet a
Ismall, on-campus apartment "from.
June 25-August 19. Please contact S.
Popp, 1570 Huntington, Grosse Pointe,
Michigan. 48236. L10
FOR SALE
BOOKS, RECORDS, music. Other items.
Good selection and Low Prices. 513
N. Division. Saturday, May 20. B16
GIRL'S BLUE English racer, very good
condition, three gears, baskets, extra
rear power. Linda, 761-6967, B17
11965 LAMBRETTA TV 200cc. 1500 miles,
ivory, excellent condition, helmet.I
After 5:30 call 668-7758. B14 }
COZY 3-BDRM. CAPE COD home for
sale. Ideal for young family. Yard,
basement, garage. Near schools and
campus. Available June. 1202 Birk.
Owner 761-9455. B15
FOUR BEDROOM, two bath, quality
home, professional neighborhood.
$27,900. *NO 3-6549. B12
PRIVATE SALE
500 BOOKS in 15 langs., ref., dicts.,I
encyc., hist., fict.-3 bkcases. Auto
lug. rack (fits compacts or reg.).
TOOLS, utensile, art supplies, type-
writer, many other goodies - filthy
cheap. SAT. 20th and SUN. 21st. 10
a.m. till 9 p.m.-302 W. Davis, Apt. 2.
B13
FOR SALE - 1965 VW, 22,000 miles,
blue. $1125. Phone 665-2426. Bil
TWO RETURN charter flight tickets
(June 3) for sale. Call 761-4733. B10O

LAWN WORK, $1.50 per hour. Own
transportation. 665-5201. H21
WANTED
Foreign Service Secretary
FOR. U.S. Information Agency
WHY: Exciting Career Opportunities
Abroad
WHERE: Worldwide Availability
WHO: Must be 21 For Assignment
Overseas
Only 19 to Apply for First 2 years
in Washington
American citizen, Single
Bounty: Beginning $4,776-$6.925.
Plus allowanceskand liberal benefits
SKILLS: Typing 50wpm. Shorthand
80wpm.
HOW: Write RECRUITMENT and
SOURCE DEVELOPMENT DIVISION
U.S. Information Agency
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20547
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
Male & Female
SH31
Camp Counselors'
Male and Female
Also Camp Secretary
Co-ed camp in Michigan
Write
Stanley Michaels,
19647 Roslyn, Detroit, Mich.,
48221-or phone UN 4-4220
H26

MODEL
CA100
CA102
Cl10
S65
CM91
090
CA160
CH160
CL160
CA77
CB77
CL77
CB450

REGULARLY
$265.90
$290.00
$291 00
$330 00
$350.00
$390.00
$373.00
$560.00
$640.00
$640.00
$685.00
$745.00,
$760.00
$995.00

We have Honda Scramblers in st
Includes delivery and 3 free serv
DEAL WITH THE GOOD GUY
THEY SELL FOR LESS
The Good Guys Will Nc
BE UNDERSOLD
DOWNTOWN HONDA
310 E. Washington Phone 66

HURON TOWERS
North Campus t
2200 Fuller Road
I Studio, 1, 2, 3 Bdrm. Furnished or
unfurnished. Free bus transportation.
Air-cond Ample parking. Pool. Rec.
room. Restaurant. Lounge. 2, 3, or 4
man apts available-summer sublets.
663-0800
Rentals from $135.00
1506 Broadway
; Modern unfurnished 1-bedroom apart-
ment with wall-to-wall carpeting, dis-
posal, stove, and refrigerator. Immed-
iate, summer, or fall occupancy.
Other 2-bedroom unfurnished ap art-

picture.

As the crowd filed out of the lents.
community hall that disappoint- CAMPUS MANAGEMENT, INC.
ing night they could smell a foul 337 East Huron
odor in the cool night air. It was 7662-7787
the scent of the rotting lumber C
house frames that had been cook-
ing eneah th ho sunall ay.LARGE. MOD. 4-man for fall rental.
ing beneath the hot sun all day. Laundry facilities, centralaair-cond.,
With a minimum of ceremony off-street parking, resident manager.,
they went home without any bet- Call Madison Management, NO 3-5584.
ter grip on their own political C26I
fate-facing a future little differ- I COUNTRY APARTMENT-Cool, close to1
ent from their dismal past. Ann Arbor, inexpensive, have your
own bedroom. Older mature room-
mate! 665-3330, 761-7819. C47
ONE MAN NEEDED to share apt, near
IM building. June-Aug. 665-5627. C48
FOR FALL
WE HAVE one and two bedroom units,
k, xnear campus and on campus for two,
. :three, or four persons. If you are
looking for nicely funrished units at
reasonable prices call 761-8055. C{
REDUCED-Attractively furnished cam-I
pus rooms. Sone paneled, carpeted.
House refrigerator and phone. Lease
>,thru mid-June, mid-August or longer.
$7-$10/week. 665-0925 or 662-7992. C41
CAMPUJS-HOSPITAL area-Large fur-
nished rooms fir men. Summer
and or fall. Call NO 8-6906. C10
CAMPUS - BURNS PARK - Nice
house furnished for 3-4. $225/mo.

dSIAMS EtI$TENU --1Purebred, Seal
-point. $15. HU 3-5811., B7
USED CARS
'59 FORD, 6 cyl., good cond. with seat
belts. 971-1727. N19
1962 VOLKSWAGEN-Fair cond., good
tires. 761-5738. $450. N17
'62 CORVAIR 700. Excel, cond. $475.
Scott, 663-8028. N18
1961 FIAT ABARTH. Aluminum body,
Michelin x-tires, 23,000 miles. $650.
668-9829. N15
VOLVO 544-1961, excellent condition,
R, H. 29 mpg. 668-9829. N10
1964 GTO Convertible-One owner. Ex-
cellent condition. 761-9358. N12
PHOTO SUPPLIES
BELL-HOWELL 35mm Robomatic slide
projector with 2 lenses and slide
trays. $100. Call 761-2838. D2
BUSINESS SERVICES
DAY NURSERY offering all day care
in pleasant atmosphere. Ages 3to 6.
Carpeted floors, new toys, and equip-
ment. Experiencedstaff. Stateli-
censed. Rear of new church. 2796
Packard Rd. 761-1457 between 1 and
5 p.m.; 761-5606, 6 p.m.-9 p.m. No
calls Sundown Friday to Sundown
Saturday. J8
TYPING-Prompt reliable service.~
761-2428 663-0980 J
COLLINS TAILORING
AND ALTERATIONS SHOP
225 E. Liberty St. 665-8195
J2
761--3993
Your number for QUICK, ACCURATE,
AND EXPERIENCED manuscript and
thesis typing, transcription-medical,
legal and technical conferences;
mimeographing; offset; ditto; lithog-
raphy; varityping and composition.
AA PROFESSIONAL SERVICE
ASSOCIATES, INC.
334 Catherine
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS

DRIVER occasionally available to assist
handicapped professor. Go in his own
car to barber shop, store, or club.
Pay $1.50 per hour, Ph. 663-4743. H29
SECRETARY
Must read Spanish proficiently. W. K.
Kellogg Foundation, Phone 616 965-
1221, 400 North Avenue, Battle Creek,
Mich. H4
COLLEGE MEN
INTERVIEWS now being arranged for
students seeking summer employ-
ment. Opportunity to join other stu-
dents in a proven, successful, scholar- !
ship program backed by 89 year old
firm. To those who qualify, our pro-
gram offers:
1. $110.50 per week salary with op-
portunity for more,
2. Executive management training
3. All expense paid trip to Honolu-
tlu, Hawaii f
S 4. One of several $1000 cash scholar-
ships
5. Recommended background work
for post-graduates
6. Up to 18 weeks continuous em-
ployment guaranteed.
These positions may develop into
part-time or full time position after
September.
For appointment call: Mr. Douglas
761-3681 (9-2) H20
BLOOD DONORS
URGENTLY NEEDED
$6 for Rh positive $7, $10, and 812 for
Rh negative. Hours: Mon. thru Thurs.
9-4: Fri, 1-7. 18-21 years old need
parent's permission. 483-1894.
YPSILANTI
Detroit Blood Service.
404 W. Michigan
,' H I

LOST AND FOUND
REWARD -' Reading notes (ye
paper) lost between U Hasp. andC
land-Forest. Call Ellie, 761-8747.
PETS AND SUPPLIES
FREE KITTENS. HOUSE TRAINED.,
Hill. 761-2537.
BARGAIN CORNER
SAM'S STORE
Has Genuine LEVI's Glor
For "Guys and Gals"
LEVI'S SLIM-FITS-$4.9
Pure White and 4 Colors
Cord. SLIM-FITS--$5.98
LEVI'S STA-PR EST PANT
Never Needs Ironing-$7
STA-PREST Slim-Fits $6.5
LEVI JACKETS
"White" or
Denim-$7.50
LEVI'S Supersims-$4.98
LEVI'S Dungorees-$5.25
S-T-R-E-T-C-H LEVI'S
"White" & Colors-56.50
COTTON TURTLENECKS-$1.7
(Colors .

Open Mon. & Fri. Nights
SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington

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