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May 18, 1967 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1967-05-18

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Seventy-Sixth Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

- -

Where Opinions ee, 420 MAYNARD ST., ANN ARBOR, MICH.

NEws PHONE: 764-0552

Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.

i

[URSDAY, MAY 18, 1967 NIGHT EDITOR: WALTER SHAPIRO
School System Discrimination:
Ann Arbor Passes the Buck

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. , and Tribune Syndicate

N ITS OWN INIMITABLE style, the city
of Ann Arbor has again managed to
ury an issue of extreme importance to
he welfare of its citizens.
The Human Relations Commission
HRC) has been concerned for a long time
bout possible discrimination at the Ann
rbor High School Cooperative Occupa-
ional Training Program, which places
tudents in part-time jobs as part of their
ormal education. Since January the staff
nembers at the HRC have twice called the
;OT offices under assumed names seek-
ng job applicants, and both times were
old upon request that no -Negroes would
e provided with information on the po-
itions.
This evidence strongly suggests that
iscrimination is being practiced on a
egular basis by the COT. And, if this
s true, it may very well be possible that
he attitude of the COT is merely a re-
lection of a generalized attitude through-
ut the high school and in the city at
arge.
)ESPITE THE SIGNIFICANCE of this
problem, no effort was made either by
he school's principal, Nicholas Schreib-
r, the School Board, or the City Coun-
iU to investigate the situation further,
lespite strong protests from local civil
ights groups. Instead, the issue was
uried in a flurry of controversy over
he ethics of the techniques used by the
IRC.
Last Monday Mayor Wendell Hulcher

recommended to the Council that a state-
ment be drawn up reaffirming "city pol-
icy to deal with the public in an open
manner and not under false pretenses.''
The motion was tabled indefinitely, but
in doing so the whole question of dis-
crimination, intricately tied to the HRC's
techniques, was also shoved aside.
The tactics used by the HRC should not
be an issue here. Robert J. Harris, profes-
sor of race relations law, said at the
meeting Monday that the conduct of the
HRC cannot be considered "entrapment"
(as some critics have claimed) because
"there was only a request made to a sus-
pected discriminatory source and not ca-
joling or pressure to engage in the unlaw-
ful act."
In criticizing the conduct of the HRC,
Mayor Hulcher has said, "The most es-
sential ingredient in government activity
is the confidence of the people. This con-
fidence must be maintained by proper
actions and behavior by all public serv-
ants and employes."
HULCHER IS RIGHT, although for the
wrong reasons. There were some pub-
lic officials who did not act properly. But
they are not the staff of the HRC. They
are men;like Hulcher, Schreiber, and con-
servative School Board member William
Godfrey who are willing to use any de-
ceptive means at their disposal to avoid
admitting that there could be a discrim-
ination problem within the school system.
-DAVID DUBOFF

"Gentlemen, choose your 'defensive' weapons... !"

Death of a Poet

[HE DEATH of John Masefield last Fri-
day ended the long career of Britain's
steemed poet. He had' held the post of
oet-laureate for 37 years, a record ex-
eeded only by Tennyson.
Masefield once said of his job that it
as "responsible for some of the worst
xafmples of poetry in the history of
nglish literature." In the 350 years that
ritain has maintained public poets, only
few of them have been able to achieve
respected position in literary history
i the face of the demeaning character
f their official claim to fame. Unhappily,
'riting poems on invitation for state oc-
asions has never been conducive to great
terary effort.
'ORTUNATELY for John Masefield, he
did not need to be poet-laureate. He,
Do, will never be remembered for the
orks he produced in his official capaci-
r. They were not inspired by his own
eed to describe, but rather by others'
leas. of what needed describing. But
[asefield had already established his
pputation long before he became Brit-
in's "state poet."
He is best known for the poems and
ovels he wrote early in the century.

They are almost without exception about
poor, wokk-hardened, struggling men and
women-not world leaders, but those who
are led and often abused by the world
they find themselves in. In "Salt-Water
Ballads," an anthology of poems about
the sea, the main characters are sailors
(Masefield was apprenticed as a cabin
boy on a merchant ship at the age of 14).
In the narrative poem "Everlasting Mer-
cy," which gave Masefield his first rec-
ognition and notoriety by shocking the
fine sensibilities of Victorian England,
the hero is a prize fighter.
THE ENGLISH GENTLEMAN who died
Friday at the age of 88 was a man
singularly unimpressed by his job. One
could almost say he was sublimely un-
suited for it. In his introduction to "Salt-
Water Ballads" he writes, "Others may
sing of the wine and the wealth and the
mirth. The portly presence of potentates
goodly in girth-Mine be the dirt and the
dross, the dust and scum of the earth."
Thankfully, the earlier works of John
Masefield the poet will in no way be
dimmed by the works of Masefield, the
poet-laureate.
-JILL CRABTREE

Lett(
Kirk
Walter Shapiro's analysis of or-
ganized crime (May 16) begins
with an account of the distaste-
ful' Kirk crime campaign but
launches into a polemic against
illegal gambling, narcotics and
prostitution.
Shapiro assumes the false pos-
ture of a social reformer by im-
plying that legalizing vice will
serve the best interests ofthe poor
and of society. Anti-crime cam-
paigns are futile 'and "naive," ac-
cording to Mr. Shapiro, because
the crimes exist only because hu-
mans have an appetite for gam-
bling, prostitution and dope ad-
diction. His analysis of the prob-
lem is economic and as such
fails to penetrate the issues he
raises. Society, he says, fails to
profit from the revenue collected
from vice, while the "American
consumer industry" of organized
crime hogs all the revenue col-
lected from the illegal practice
of these now illegal "goods and
services." His solution, legalizing
vice, creates the paradox of the
dog chasing his tail.
The states, hungry for revenue
to cure conditions of poverty
("slums" and "inferior educa-
tion"), would finance housing
projects and beef up urban schools
by collecting funds from legalized
gambling, dope addition and pros-
titution, all of which aregenerat-
ed by the very slum conditions
the cities and states would be try-
ing to eliminate.
WHAT MR. SHAPIRO fails to
note is that crime and vice are
caused by more or less the same
human proclivity for degenerate
behavior and, legalizing one will
never eliminate or even control the
other. He might do well to re-
member thatour laws, which he
calls "peculiar native customs,"
which declare both prostitution
and murder illegal are among the
same set of "native customs" that
abolished slavery and obtained civ-
il rights legislation. If it would
be legal to sell sex, then why not
revert to selling human beings
outright into slavery, since pros-
titution, like dope addiction, de-
prives the individual of the free-
dom to act and to think, thus
leaving him in the condition of
slavery?
If a depraved physical environ-
ment leads to a "hopeless fu-
ture," it does not benefit those
deprived of a future to institu-
tionalize the same vices that keep
them futureless.
-Susannah Smith, Grad
Today and,

Prs to the Editor
'Fallacy of Mortals' the plague:
the last of
branches breaking from yot
and because the most vi
we ourselves have not yet broken from yot
we assume to bend the path of all this you
wind and it shal
you."~
and why as though we
as though titude
we could block the hail from more than or
every blossom to crowd the
and around every orange we watch the;
could cup our hands at the rumor
so that the frost would never crack both
touch it open
and then the wind, feeling faint leaving them
and sorry, fertile rubt
would swear on honor to stop of baptized s
whipping. stars;
but now they
and why to hear listen
the sound of our self-sanctified for bullets th
voice : zealous pri+
"We shall heal your enduring "Such was
wounds mortals.'
and when we are near -Chri

s will not find you
pirates shall be lost
ur ports
,ie of demons, cast
ur cities
shall see
1 be a sign unto
expected the mul-
nce disappointed
mountain and
sky
that truth would
t syand mountain
free to till the
ble
oil and groundly
bother only to
at inevitably echo
the fallacy of
stine Hoyt, LS&A

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Report From WSU
By MIKE THORYN under the direction of Harold
and JEFF HADDEN Stewart. former director of pub-
Special To The Daily lic safety at Wayne who died in
ETROIT-Wayne State stu- 1964. They were continued by two
t leader Chuck Larson's words university security police, Edward
erscore the obvious: "This Stodgill and George Sykes.
t the University of Michigan." The files were burned in a
TSU is an urban commuter girls' dormitory while Larson and
ol with its own set of prob- two others watched. Donald Stev-
s and characteristics. One of ens, director of public safety since
most significant of these is last June, said that the only rec-
the majority of students leave ords maintained by his staff were
campus at night, giving the in a criminal complaint file. In-
ersity the appearance of a de- formation in the burned file was
ed factory after closing. "of no value at all."
arson, a 19-year-old junior, is
irman of the Wayne Student- WITH THE destruction of the
ulty Council (S-FC), the equiv- records accomplished, the move-
it of our Student Government ment has continued with agita-
ncil. He is also one of the tion for a greater voice in govern-
cipal leaders of the new Wayne ing student affairs. WSM pre-
dent Movement (WSM). It is sented a list of six demands to the
he role that Larson is finding administration:tvoting member..
just how difficult it is to ships for students on each presi-
use student interest under com- dential advisory committee; a stu-
er conditions. The group of dent spokesman on WSU's board
lent activists spearheading the of governors; binding referen-
'ement is smalland marked by dums investigatory powers for the
!rnal dissension. stuent-faculty committee; student
he movement "according to selection of administrators, and
son" grew out of "a 24-hour sole decision-making power for
" outside university Presi- the students "in areas of basic
t William R. Keast's office May academic policy, such as faculty
protest a "lack of intellectual hiring."
esty within the university." Larson said at the time that the
sues that inflamed the mem- manifesto was "definitely not a
of WSM were the discovery demand for student control. "On
iles on student activists and these presidential advisory com-
oncealed movie camera in a mittees we'd be only one vote out
is' washroom that had moni- of; 10. But if they're playing tricks"
d both student and faculty we'll be able to see it, that's all."
abers. The movement was suc- There is some feeling among
ful in getting the files burned students, however, that the admin-
in publicizing the use of the istration is not the only group
sera which had been removed playing tricks. Both Kupelan and
er a year-and-a-half or three Jim Wadsworth, secretary of S-
s ago depending on whether FC, think that the movement may
believe WSM or the adminis- be a ploy on Larson's part to se-
ion, cure his own position as S-FC
chairman in this week's election.
OTH INCIDENTS brought to Wadsworth charged that Larson
t a lack of fair play on the and WSM are too eager to dem-
of previous administrations onstrate rather than discuss, and
gained big headlines in both points to the timing of the "vig-
roit newspapers. The move- il"dthree weks before a campus
it is now making the familiar wide S-FC election. Kupelian was
and for more student partici- blunt. "Before the movement,
on in university affairs. But Larson didn't have a prayer."
vast majority of students sim- Larson denies any personal po-
aren't interested. litical motivation. He feels that
GC found it difficult to break he is representing the interest of
)ugh student apathy last year. all students. Describing student
the odds against WSM are reaction to the movement,Larson'
ly insurmountable. Most of outlined three levels of improve-
students live off campus and ment: the five or six leaders, peo-
mute to class. Some 13,000 of ple active in shaping policy, and
university's 30,000 students at- finally those who are merely sym-
Sclass part time, work 30 pathetic.
rs a week, and often support Kupelian is skeptical of any of
amily. The average full-time Larson's efforts. When asked what
student commutes to class S-'C had accomplished, before the
a as far as 15 miles away. Only protests, he replied, "Bus shelters."
t 800 students live in dormi- He predicts, at best "another com-
es on campus, mission to study commissions."
'eceding the round-the-clock Wadsworth sees the movement
, 18 students signed a peti- making small gains from great de-
stating their concern over a mands. Individual college units
of student participation inrwithin the university will be the
university decision - making organs through which pass-fail
ess and the existence of files courses and ag reater student voice
Sby the university security on committees will be achieved.
e on groups such as the Disavowing Larson's methods,
.ng Socialists' Alliance and Wadsworth Predicts the changes
lents for a Democratic Socie- will continue to come through rec-
as well as records of criminal ognized channels of communica-
sts, thefts and homosexual ac- tion,
y. When asked why he chose
3 to initiate his protest, Lar- THIS WEEK'S S-FC election will
replied that it was well enough indicate the success of the Wayne
re midterm exams to allow Student Movement in winning over
lent interest to build. "We real- the students. Their demands have
the time table is working met a discouraging response from
nst us. That's why we are con- the administration. "Keast," said
rating on educational issues." Kupelian, "very eloquently told
east at this time stated that them to go to dhell." In the face
lid not know of any such files. of repeated demands for more stu-
the next day Keast promised dent participation, Keast set up
urn the files whose existence a committee composed entirely of
tad earlier denied. administrators to investigate the
artan Kutelian, editor of the camera incident,
ne Daily Collegian, expressed But Larson remains optimistic.
view that the Keast adminis- "These are new people he says,
ion hadn't really known about committedrto a lifetime of activ-
files: "Vice-President for Stu- ism."
Affairs McCormick set out Others are not so sure. "Most

rove the files didn't exist, and people of this university," said
!n he pulled the drawer out, one student, "don't give a damn
e they were." Dating back to who runs the place as long as they
early '50's, the files were begun get their sheepskins."
Meetingo

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--- S -R Iand Tribune Syndicate

oIt

"Could you please hurry it!"

Tomorrow ... By Walter Lippmann

Jeoar Education Act

WASHINGTON-There is under
serious attack the measure which
may well come to be thought of
as the greatest single peacetime
achievement of the Kennedy-
Johnson administration-the Ed-
ucation Act which passed in 1965.
This act opened the way through
the conflict between the Cath-
olics and the anti-Catholics, the
conflict which has been so stub-
born and perplexing an irritant
in the life of the American people.
The 1965 act which was worked
up in the Kennedy administration
and improved and enacted in the
Johnson administration settled, or
at least quieted down, the contro-
versy over whether federal money
may be used for the education of
children in Catholic schools. The

cation in districts with many poor
families. The monies are spent by
public school authorities, but they
devise programs in which Cath-
olic students participate.
SINCE 1965 the old controversy
has subsided. The anti-Catholics
have accepted the act which pro-
vides Catholic children with edu-
cational advantages. The Catholic
hierarchy and the Catholic com-
munity have been satisfied, al-
though the parochial schools re-
ceive no direct aid. The National
Education Association, which ard-
ently proposed a quite different
measure of federal aid, has sup-
ported the 1965 act since it was
enacted.
Quie Droposed to unsettle all

cation funds. But the constitu-
tions of some 20 states bar the
use of state funds for parochial
schools.
If the funds presently adminis-
tered by HEW were to be given
over the states, the whole
church-state question would be
reopened. The Quie bill would
bring down in a crash the struc-
ture of the 1965 settlement of the
church and state school issue.
FURTHERMORE, the Quie bill
would spread education funds
much more evenly over the na-
tion's school districts. This would
mean that poor schools, mainly
in the rural South and in the big
cities, would lose support. If the
Quie bill were passed. 16 South-

By DAVID BERSON
CBS News, well-known for its
persistance in placing the issues
before the American people,
knocked off a situation comedy or
something- like that, presenting
"Town Meeting of the World" on
Monday night.
The program starred Senator
Robert Kennedy and Governor
Ronald Reagan, with the part of
hostile audience played by a group
of international students.
The program got off to a rough
start with neither American
having much success at answering
the students' questions. They evi-
dently weren't communicating
with themselves either, beginning
each state with "I guess I didn't
make myself clear on that Sen-
ator/Governor."
The students seemed annoyed
at first by this and persisted in
shouting, "You didn't answer my
question! Answer my question!"
"I was just getting to that.
Please listen to me," said the star
apologetically.
THEN THERE came the tradi-
tional hang-ups over history. Was
Diem a puppet? No, he was elected
in a national referendum? What
is the legal justification for U.S.
intervention? Well, we were in-

Governor had chalked up equal
meter ratings by the first com-
mercial.
THEY CAME OUT for the second
act, apparently determined to end
the deadlock. Reagan, who noted
he was the oldest person there,
began his Death Valley Days
changes, saying things like "We
have been consitent with our her-
itage of defending all peoples'
pursuit of freedom and happiness
and equality."
Kennedy got out his apologetic
bag-"There are mistakes. We are
not always right. We are trying to
find the best way."
As they came down the stretch,
the two were mouth-to-mouth and
teeth-to-teeth, when Kennedy
took to the whip. He interrupted
narrator Charles Collingwood's
close with "May I have just one
moment?"
"I know I speak for the Gover-
nor and myself when I say that we
need more of this kind of fruitful
dialogue. The world is growing
smaller and smaller and we must
understand each other."
The moment turned into about
five minutes. Then Reagon inter-
rupted the narrator and asked for
his moment. Collingwood then
busted the meter with, "Yes Gov-
ernor, you may second that."

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