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May 18, 1967 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1967-05-18

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY. MAY 18, 1967

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SELF-HELP PROJECT:
Watts Students, UCLA Class

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Plan Area Amusements Center

LOS ANGELES (P)-Twice a1
week, 30 Negro high school seniors
from Wyatts gather in a laboratory
at the University of California at
Los Angeles to work on a $1 mil-
lion, business that could keep them
busy the rest of their lives.
The teenagers have joined a
UCLA engineering class in a;
unique self-help project quietly
hailed as the first to capture the
Watts areas imagination since be-;
fore the summer rioting of 1965.
A scale model of-their dream-.
a 71/2 acre community amusement
center-is taking shape in the
laboratory.
Own Design
The youngsters, working with the
student engineers, have designed
and planned the center. They will
help build and operate it and will
even be stockholders.
Called the Watts Amusement
Center, Inc., the project was in-,
spired by Dr. Morris Asimow,
UCLA engineering professor.
Few physical scars remain in

Wats as reminders of the bloody top Negro sculptors, was among
rioting of August 1965. the youth leaders contacted. He is
With government help, the a director of one of the 18 teen
neighborhood business c e n t e r s posts in Watts set up through the
have been rebuilt. Office of Economic Opportunity
But most civil rights leaders after the 1965 riots.
complain the government largesse "We described our program to
did little to remove the racial re- him and it caught," said Asimow.
sentment and hurt. Miller, 57, had criticized previous
It was while casting about for efforts to salve the sores of racial

Kentucky Community
Removes Professor
CUMBERLAND, Ky. (CPS>-source also said the book has re-
People in this small community in ceived the praise of Jesse Stuart
the far southeastern part of Ken- a Kentucky poet Pennington re#
tucky are beginning to calm down portedly is a disciple of Stuart.
after a successful campaign drive Nevertheless, reaction has been
to a college professor out of town. severe. The source close to Pen-
Residents here and in other nington said the professor has re-
Harlan County communities be- ceived numerous threats of vio-
came incensed over a book of pro- lence and that his life has been
test poems published by a creative threatened.
writing class at the University of Ironically. Pennington did not
Kentuck's Southeast Community write any of the poems in the
College in the heart of Appalachia. book. All were written by students
The professor of the class, Lee in his Creative writing class.
Penington, 28, had to leave town ini gtive wting ash.
and go into hiding because he did "egennington's status at the col-
not feel safe among the angry lege remains. unclear at this time,
citizens here. Unconfirmed reports said the col-
Thentrouble began shortly after lege's advisory board has recomt
the book of poems entitled "To- mended that he be fired and that
morow's People," was published the college's director, Dr. James
and dediated to Harlan County. Falkenstine, has asked for Pen-
Most of the county's residents, ningtOn's resignation,
especially county off iials, min- Dr. Ellis Hartford, dean of the
isters and academicians, think the UK Community Colleges, said
poems are in poor taste and dis- nothing has been settled yet. "Bu
credit the county and the college. my guess is that Pennington wiTT
Three of the poems were found prefer to go someplace else next
most objectionable. One by Angie year," he said.

class homework yast year that Asi-
mow decided to build something
lasting for Watts. He had recently
gained a summer grant for one of
his top graduate students, Fred
Slaughter, a lifelong resident of
Watts and former captain of the
UCLA basketball team.
Slaughter, 25, did much of the
groundwork on the project before
leaving to work for a law degree
at Columbia 'University in New
York.
They met with various business
and youth groups in the Negro
community to discuss possible en-
terprises.
Guy Miller, one of the nation's

Controversy Sparks UAC
Fall Series of Disccussions

unrest in Watts.
Now Miller had a ready store of
youthful talent and enthusiasm at
his Studio 103 teen post, so called
because his programs mostly dwelt
on art, drama and photography.
Teen agers from four high
schools set up committees to con-
ceive a project for Asimow and
his student engineers-
They came up with an auto-!
motive wonderland, bristling with
midget car race tracks and drag
strips and a build-it-yourself go-
cart shop, and including a swim-
ming pool, canopied dance pavil-
ion, skating rink and hot dog
stands.
Said Miller: "The amusement
center is the first project brought
into Watts from the outer com-
munity to be warmly received."
Talks are under way with a rail-
road to buy the necessary land.
Asimow hopes supplies and ma-
terials will be donated.
Sell Shares
To raise money, shares in the
corporation will be sold throughout
southeast Lon Angeles. Loans will
be floated through commercial
banks and the U.S. Small Business
Administration.
And Asimow has hopes of get-
ting a $200,000 grant from the
federal government, should Con-
gress approve the $75 million Pres-
ident Johnson wants funneled in-
to the nation's big cities to provide
jobs for teenagers this summer.
He figures 300 teenagers and
young adults will be kept busy
during the construction phase and
that it will take a force of 250
to operate the center once it's
built.
"This is no hit or miss proposi-
tion," he said. "It will provide
contnuous employment without
continuous funding."

JAMES P. HOFFA, left, son of imprisoned Teamster Union president James R. Hoffa, receives per-
mission from Mrs. George Henry to plant a campaign poster on her lawn. Democrat Hoffa will
face Anthony C. Licata, right, Republican candidate, in a May 23 special Detroit election for the
Michigan House of Representatives.
Hoffa's Son Runs in Electionl
For Detroit Seat to State House

By JON W. ROBINSON
Controversy seems to be the key
to next fall's University Activi-
ties Center Contemporary Discus-
sion program.
Beginning on Sept. 27, Mark
Lane will begin the series with a
discussion of his book "Rush to
Judgment." Lane's book which
accuses the, Warren Commission
of acting too hastily in their in-
vestigation of the Kennedy assas-
sination was a long-time best-
seller.
The 1964 Republican presiden-
tial nominee, Barry Goldwater,
will arrive on Oct. 8
On Oct. 11 will be former Epis-
copal Bishop Rev. James H. Pike
of California. Bishop Pike, who
may be facing a heresy trial by
church bishops is currently in res-
idence at the Center of Demo-

cratic Institutions. He will deliver
a speech entitled "Fewer Beliefs,
More Belief."
On Oct. 29, F. Lee Baily will
elaborate on the headline-grab-
bing Drs. Sam Sheppard and Cop-
polino trials.
Student tickets for the series
will cost $3 and individual student
tickets will cost $1, less than a
movie.
Rosyln Braeman, UAC executive
vice-president, said they could not
finance quality speakers without
having a nominal charge. Despite
the charge she said that UAC has
still budgeted a $2,500 loss on the
series.
Goldwater will cost them $2,000
and the other speakers will run
only slightly less. UAC must also
come up with money for travel
expenses, the rental of Hill Audi-
torium, and advertising expenses.

I

DETROIT ()-A you
fresh out of law school
in a special election f
state office wouldn't attr
attention-usually.
But the race that ends
places on Detroit's north,
next Tuesday has sparke
terest of national leader
political parties, plus mil
have feelings about th
James Hoffa.
The race pits James Ph
fa, 26, son of the ii
Teamster Union presiden
Anthony C. Licata 48,a
tising executive making
bid for elective office.
Hoffa is a Democrat.
a Republican.

ung man all the help he can get in winning "I'm running for the State House.
I running a fiscal reform program that could Democrat,"
or minor bolster his chances as a presiden- But the young man, chunky like
act ,much tial candidate. his father, shows a trace of anger
Romney took the district-the when asked directly if he had
in polling 19th-in hs landslide reelection tried to avoid mention of the
iwest side last fall, and he plans to cam- head of the family.
d the in- paign for Licata this weekend. "No," he says firmly. "You never
s in both But, the odds currently favor try to disassociate yourself from
lions who Hoffa. He got the nomination over your father. I'm running on my
he name 15 others, and the district is usual- own qualifications and my experi-
ly considered safe for Democrats. erice in the Senate."
hilip Hof- Kennedy Support The experience is one year's
mprisoned Hoffa also has the endorsement work as a state legislative aide.
t, against of Vice President Hubert H. Hum- Hoffa also is running with the
an adver- phrey. And has the support of endorsement and help of the
a second New York Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, Teamsters and the United Auto
who, as attorney general, started Workers, both powerful in the
Licata is the federal prosecution that re- district, not to mention the city.
cently jailed the senior Hoffa for Teamsters Campaign

Skidmore, a sophomore, refers to
God as an "omnipotent boob." An-
other by freshman Carson Hansel
contlains a line about Christ re-
turning to earth only to fall in
love with Brigette Bardot. The
third one, by sophomore K. D.
Petrey, characterizes a sheriff in
an unnamed county, and was ap-
parently too realistic.
Pennington thinks the poems
are literary and not political, ac-
cording to a friend who asked that
he remain unidentified. He thinks
the poems give students a chance
to express their attitudes, The
WINNER OF 6 ACADEMY
AWARDS INCLUDING
BEST PICTURE
OF THDE YEAR!
COLUMBIA PICTURES prefen U
FRED ZINNEMANN'S
FILM OF
A MAN
FORALL
SEASONS
CAMPUS

Pennington has been an in-
structor at the Southeast Com-
munity College for two years. He
has written and published numer-
ous poems, and his students ha'vp
published more than 1,000 poems
themselves. Pennington has used
his own money to pay for previous
publications.

House Vacancy
They're seeking to fill a house
vacancy caused by a death in that
chamber, which has a 54-54 Dem-
ocrat-Republican split. Republican
Gov. George Romney badly needs

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jury tampering. The Teamsters threw 70 men
Hoffa the candidate has little into the primary campaign, and
or nothing to say about the en- they're involved in this campaign,
dorsement by Kennedy, a bitter too. Campaign coordinator is Otto
foe of his father. He campaigns Wendell, an official of the senior
in the mainly middle-class district Hoffa's home Local No. 299.
where many industrial union While young Hoffa makes his
members live. daily rounds surrrounded by aides
But he doesn't hide the fact and others, Licata often campaigns
that his father is in jail, either. alone.
'U' GraduateI He works at, his office until' 1
Young Hoffa, a University Law p.m. each day, then strikes out on
School graduate, visited his father walking tours, greeting people on
at the Federal Penitentiary at the streets and knocking at doors.
Lewisburg, Pa., recently. He came "We have a plan," said the at-
away saying he'd been told "to tractive, wavy-haired Licata as
run and run hard." he stumped the district in a pin-
Dressed in tweed coat and regi- stripe suit, a raincoat and brief
mental striped tie and handing case under his arm.
out campaign literature that bears "There are certain things I am
a picture of his whole family, to do, and I'm doing them," he
young Hoffa is smiling and easy- adds.
going. But he himself remains guarded
"Hi, I'm Jim Hoffa," he says. about his chances.

HELD OVER!
FELLINI'S
LA'DOLCE
VITA'
UNCENSORED
IN ENGLISH
(not subtitles)
Ann Arbor, Michigan
z10 S. Fiftb Avenue
761-9700

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Mienigan for which The
Michigan )aily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Satarday apd Sunday. General
Notices may be published a mail-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9120.
THURSDAY, MAY 18
'Day Calendar
School of Social Work Seminar -
"Meeting Social Welfare Manpower
Needs": Raekham Bldg., Registration,
3:3Q a.m.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-"Management by Objectives":
8:45 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
International Center Tea-603 East
Madison, 4:30 p.m.
General Notices
Computing Center Course: The Com-
puting Center aniounces a short course
"The Use of the IBM 360/67 MTS Sys-
tem, including Fortran IV." Fri., May
26, 1-5 pn., Room 1400 Chemistry Bldg.
Registration not necessary, Inquiries
may be addressed to Prof. Bernard A.
Galler.
Doctoral Examination for Robert John
Urquhart, Electrical Engineering; thesis:
"Degree Constrained Subgraphs of Lin-
ORGANIZATION]
NOTICES
USE OF 'PHIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and 'registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 SAB.
Christian Science Organization, Week-
ly testimony meeting. Thurs., May 18,
7:30-8 :3U p.m,, 3545 SAB.
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, Sab-
bath service, theme: "Israel Independ-
ence Day," Fri., May 19, 7:15 p.m.,
Zwerdling-Cohn Chapel at the Hillel
Foundation.
* * *
B'nai B'ritr Hillel Foundation, Picnic
celebrating Israel's Independence Day,
Sun., May 21, 1-5 p.m., Dexter-Huron-
Metro Park.-Everybody's bringing his
own food-but dessert, Israeli food spe-
cialties, music are provided. If weather
is uncertain, phone Hillel (663-4129)
by 11 a.m If raining, eat at home
and come to Hillel at 2 p.m. for free
music, dancing, Israeli food specialties,
dessert and coffee.
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk dance
with instruction open to everyone, Fri.,
May 19, 8-11 p.m., Barbour Gym.

ear Graphs," Thurs., May 18, at 2 p.m.,
Room 1300 East Engineering. Chairman,
E. L. Lawler.
Doctoral Examination for George Rob-
ert Olsson, Aeospace Engineering; thes-
is: "Acceleration of a Hypersonic Boun-
dary Layer Approaching a Corner,"
Thurs., May 18, Room 1028 East Engi-
neering, at 9:30 a.m. Chairman, A. F.
Messiter.
Doctoral Examination for George Jo-
seph Quarderer, Chemical Engineering;
thesis: "Photochemical Chlorination of
Sulfur Dioxide Utilizing a Plasma Light
Source," Thurs., May 18, Room 3201
East Engineering, at 1:30 p.m. Chair-
man, R. H. Kadlec.
Doctoral Examination for Douglas
Holcombe Armstrong, Romance Lan-
guages and Literatures: Spanish; thes-
is: "The Novel of the Spanish Civil
War-a Thematic Appraisal-1936-1960,"
Fri., May 19, Room 2072 Frieze Bldg.,
at 10 a.m. Chairman, M. Z. Hafter.
International Hour: Thurs., May 18,
4:30-6 p.m. Punch and cookies served,
International Center.
Astronomical Colloquium: Room 807
Physics-Astronomy Bldg. Prof. William
P. Bidelman, Department of Astronomy,
University of Michigan, will speak on
"The Northwestern Space-Spectroscopy
Symposium and the Paris Abundances

Conference," Fri., May 19, 4 p.m.
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student sponsored
events becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be with-
held 'until the approval has become ef-
fective.
Approval request forms for student
sponsored events are available in Room
1011 of the SAB.
University Activities Center, Mixer,
May 19, 9-12 p.m., Union Ballroom.
Lecture: Prof. H. A. Skinner of the
University of Manchester, Manchester,
England, will speak Thurs., May 18, at
8 p.m. In Room 1300 Chem.-Pharm.
Bldg. His talk will be entitled "Prog-
ress in Microcalorimetry." Prof. Skin-
ner presenting is a visiting professor at
the University of Colorado.
Foreign Visitors'
The following foreign visitors can be
reached through the Foreign Visitor
Programs Office, 764-2148.
Dr. Ramon Naranjo, Ford Foundation
travel and study awardee, Mexico, May
15-18.
Gwee Yee-hean, Department of Edu-
cation, University of Singapore, Singa-
pore, May 17-18.
Kikuo Yamakawa, professor of Eng-
lish, Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo,
Japan, May 18-19.

Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Ferkauf Graduate School of Humani-
ties and Social Sciences, Yeshiva Uni-
versity, N.A.C.-Offers one 6 week ses-
sion and two 4 week sessions Areas
of specialization in Curriculum & In-
struction, Guidance, Phychology, Reli-
gious education, Special education,
workshops in these necessitate advance
enrollment, contact Bureau.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Midwest Research Institute, Kansas
City, Mo.-Biol. Sci. - Bacteriologist,
PhD, Biochem., MS Med. ! Tech., ASCP
and BS levels in Bacteriol. & Chem.
Math & Physics-Stat., Human Factors
Engr., Exper. Psychol., Chem. Physicist,
Oper Res. in Military and Industrial.
Economic Dev.-Reglonal and Indus-
trial economists. Chemistry - Organic,
Polymer, Analytical, Chem. Engr. and
Physical Chem.
Lynchburg Public Library, Va.--Ref-
erence Assistant, MLS plus some suc-
cessful exper. Childrens' Librarian, MLS
plus 2-3 yrs. in childrens' work.
Ford Motor Co. Saline, Mich.-Lab-
oratory Test Engineer in electrical op-
tics. Immediate opening, new grad, no
exper. req., Phys. major or Chem. with
strong phys. background.
* * *
For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.

t
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i
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;,

A BENEFIT FOR APRIL MOBILIZATION
Flower Power
Bill
Fridy*, May 19-9 P.M.
AT TH'- ARMORY-223 E. Ann
Featuring
PRIME MOVERS & SEVENTH SEAL

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Phone 434-0190
E n6-A.a ax, mCARPENTER ROAD
OPEN 7:00
NOW SHOWING
"1030 PM.
sumer"
Shown at 8:0 5& 11:40
ALSO.

UNION-LEAGUE

MIXER,

SPRING REVIVAL
with the
APOSTLES

Light Show-Films
Tickets $2.00 at Fishbowl,
Discouni RecorJs, and at the door.

FRIDAY, MAY 19--9-12
Union Ballroom
FRE E

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141

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