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August 29, 1967 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-08-29

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TUESDAY, AUGUST 29,1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAC

TUESDAY AUGUST29,_197 THElJI. IGA flATL

A rtis tic

Free dom

DELAY ACTION ON 'U' BUDGET:

Regents Defer Action on Tuition Increas

The California Case on which
Elden based his decision was over-
turned early in July by the Cali-
fornia Supreme Court.
Attorney W i111 a m Goodman
conceded that the decision "was
a bad loss for .our side." Although
he declined to predict what might
happen in another court if the
film is ruled obscene, there seems
to be some optimism among those
involved in the case that a higher
court would uphold the charge of
illegal search and seizure, which
would result in dropping the en-
tire case against the four de-
fendants. According to the de-
fendants, that issue will be press-
ed; however, only if the examina-
tion decides that the film is ob-
scene.
With the denial of the defense
motion for the dismissal of the
case, the hearing continues to
determine the obscenity of the
film.
Comment on the artistic quali-
ties and social significance of the
film have come from all sectors.
A pamphlet written for Cinema
Guild and distributed by them re-
lies extensively on Pauline Kael
of The New Republic and Susan
Sontag, writing in The Nation.
Sontag comments "Smith's (pro-

ducer of "Flaming Creatures")
depicting of nakedness and var-
ious sexual embraces . . . is both
too full of pathos and too ingen-
uous to be prurient. Smith's
images of sex are alternately
childlike or witty, rather than
sentimental or lustful." While
Miss Kael, not necessarily lauding
underground films, does believe
that "they are right in what they
are against, the lavis hand taste-
less waste and phony 'craftman-
ship' of Hollywood."
Faculty members who have seen
the film in private showing,
Robert Sklar of the history de-
partment and John Styan of the
English department, appeared late
in May before Elden as defense
witnesses. Sklar testified that
"Flaming Creatures" is significant
in the development of contem-
porary American pictures, "par-
odying and extending themes of
important earlier American
films." Styan explained that it
"takes our image of sex as ex-
pressed in the commercial media
. . . to make us laugh at it and
be repulsed by it."
Elden's' decision on the obscen-
ity of the film will probably be
made by the fall semester begins.
If Elden decides that the film has

redeeming social value, the case
against Cinema Guild will be
dropped and Cinema Guild's
countersuit against Ann Arbor
Police Chief Walter Krasny, Lieut.
Eugene Staudenmeier, and As-
sistant Washtenaw County Prose-
cutor Thomas Shea will then be
cinsidered by the court. The suit
asks for an injunction restrain-
ing the local police from subse-
quent prosecution, arrests, sand
seizures for showing art films, a
declaratory judgment prohibiting
"prior censorship of films" by the
police, immediate return of the
seized copy of "Flaming Crea-
tures," and $15,000 damages.
If, however, Elden rules that
the movie is obscene, then the
case will go to circuit court for
actual trial.
Whether or not society's values1
can be challenged effectively in
a university setting without fear
of reprisal is at stake in this
case. Society's stiffling of its
critics has often gone unnoticed;
the Cinema Guild case is an open
confrontation. If a university can
not foster experimentation in the
arts then its value as an educa-
tional institution in pursuit of
truth has been most certainly
greatly diminished. ,

(Continued from Page 1)
regard to the University's appro-
priation according to Regent Fred-
erick Matthaei, Jr. The meeting
lasted for almost six hours be-
cause "this is a serious problem
and there is a lot of concern," he
explained.
Regent Otis Smith, the lone
Democrat on the Board, expressed
the general sentiment of the Board
when he noted that "this is the
only sensible thing we can do at
this time."
Regent Robert Briggs asked if
there "was any way we can soften
the blow with deferred payments?"
Wilbur K. Pierpont, vice-president
and chief financial officer, told
the Board that a deferred tuition
payment plan is presently avail-
able and that residence hall
charges may be paid on a monthly
basis.
Vice-President Niehuss explain-
ed that although the Legislature
recommends a large out-of-state
fee increase, "they can't tell us
how to charge to raise the money
we need."
Vice-President Smith said, "I
don't think tuition will go high
enough to discourage out-of-state
students."
Faculty members also expressed
concern over the University's fi-
nancial situation.
Prof. Peter Bauland of the Eng-
lish department, who is associat-
ed with the American Association

of University Professors, com-
mented, "This budget makes
things very grim. Salary wise, we
could start to slip out of the
league we play in with another
year like this. Commitments have
already been made for new pro-
fessor's salaries-the existing pro-
fessors are the ones that don't
know what they'll be getting."
"Our rating as far as salary
could go down nationally," he
commented, "and we could become
more vulnerable to loss of our pro-
fessors. However, money alone will
not cause a man to leave. Space,
clerical help, and good students

are inducements to teach at a
school as much as money is."
Dean Gordon Van Wylen of the
Engineering College, said "With'
out the resources of a larger bud-
get, we can't move into new areas
we should such as computer tech-
nology, space research, or ocean
engineering. Right now we're
handicapped by lack of equipment
-it will be more of a problem now.
Another year like this would be
devastating."
Prof. Wilbert McKeachie, chair-
man of the psychology depart-
ment, also said that clerical help
was the worst shortage in his de-

partment now and any cut would
be "terrible."
President designate of the Uni-
versity Robben Fleming said he
was not familiar enough with our
budget to comment on the effects
of the low figure, although he has
recently been through the same
thing in Wisconsin.
"I am very disappointed about
it," he said.
Dean James Robertson of the
literary college, new director of the
Residential C o l1e g e, said he
thought the Residential College
wont suffer from the state appro-'
priation this year. But, he added,
"Now that there is a better tax
base, the state of Michigan could!
have supported the University with
more confidence and generosity."

Text of Hatcher's
Recommendation
It is recommended that I
Regents authorize payment
the July 1967 payrolls and I
continuation of other July o
erations, subject to the fin
determination of all sources
revenue for 1967-68, includi
an adjustment of the stude
fee schedules.
In considering the fee sche
ule changes, we intend to
sure that " no University
Michigan student will be pr
vented from continuing his e
ucation because of insufficie
financial support.

COMPARATIVE TUITION LEVELS
The following figures represent a view of the University's
undergraduate fees as compared to current levels at other col-
leges and universities in the state.

WELCOME, STUDENTS

The University
Michigan State
Wayne State
Eastern Michigan
Grand Valley
Western Michigan
Central Michigan
Northern Michigan
Ferris State

$348.00
358.50
312.00
240.00
315.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
275.00

$1,000.00
1.024.50
750.00
-600.00
750.00
600.00
600.00
600.00
590.00

I

MOMMA LOVES IT!

DAD NEEDS IT!

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The only good 15c hamburgers
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CINEMA GUILD'S obscenity case is presently awaiting judgment in the Ann Arbor Municipal Court.

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Tramlatedby DonlWatwon

ii SEPTEMBER 19- NOVEMBER 51

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