100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 09, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-08-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 9,

THE MICHIGAN DAIlY WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 9.

,,

Ford Hits
War Tactics

Many Negroes Vote in Mississippi

in Vietnam In Spite of All-Segregationist Slate

Says Johnson Sparing
Good Bombing Sites
Near Hanoi-Haiphong
WASHINGTON (P)-House Re-
publican leader Gerald R. Ford of
Michigan accused President John-
son's administration yesterday of
ordering United States air men to
spare most legitimate North Viet-
namese targets.
Under these circumstances, he
told the House, he opposes send-
ing - the additional 45.000 to 50,-
000 troops Johnson has said will
be dispatched to the war zone.
"It is my earnest plea that he
will reconsider," Ford concluded
in his prepared speech.
'Pulling Punches'

JACKSON, Miss. WP) -Missis-
sippi's Negro voters, 185,000 strong,
were ready to flex their muscle
in a statewide Democratic primary
yesterday, in spite of the fact that
none of the seven candidates for
governor had sought their votes.
Every candidate has declared
himself a segregationist, although
only one has openly campaigned
on that theme. A popular cam-
paign tactic has been to accuse
an opponent of having Negro sup-
port.
The state's Negroes could have
cast a quarter of the 650,000 total
ballots which were expected in the
election. However, few people were
expecting the Negroes to turn out
in such strength, and indications
were that they would not vote as

to lay the groundwork for a joint H. Meredith. surprised state poli-
endorsement of statewide candi- ticians and dismayed a few with
dates before the second primary a "recommendation" that Negroes
is held Aug. 29. or perhaps before vote for former Gov. Ross R. Bar-
the general election in November. nett.
Lawrence Guyot, chairman of Meredith, who enrolled in the
the Negro Mississippi Freedom University of Mississippi in 1962
Democratic Party, said: "It is our over Barnett's determined opposi-
position not to support anyone for tion, said all the candidates "rate
governor or lieutenant governor in zero" on race, so he chose Barnett
the first primary." for his economic programs.
One civil rights figure, James Later he endorsed a book written

by the late Sen. Theo G. Bilbo of
Mississippi which states that Ne-
groes' mental capabilities are in-
ferior to whites, and suggest that
Negroes be sent to Africa.
The one candidate who has
stresser segregation is James E.
Swan.
Swan has protested the "mass
integrated jungles that the so-
called federal judges have ordered
for our children this fall."

EGENTS PAUL POEBEL (left), Fred Matthaei, Jr.; and Robert Briggs all voted in favor of raising
ition to provide $4.6 million more for the University's budget at the Regents' meeting yesterday.
Le ents Tuition Hike Increases
unds Available for Student Aid

Its theme, repeated eight times, a bloc.
was "Why are we still pulling our Loss of Support
air power punch?" It is taken for granted in Mis
The White House declined com- sissippi that a runoff candidate
mnn fl4 nn th-I, n pr h-1-- -- *,- -. - .1.,1 - 4-' .-

.0

Ford, who has generally sup-
ported the administration in Viet-
nam, told newsmen his statement
is a personal one, but that it is
in line with positions taken by the
national Republican Coordinating
Committee.
His statements about high-level
orders hampering air operation,
he said, have "absolute confirma-
tion" from sources he cannot re-}
Iveal.
His charges included:
"High level directives for more
that two years prevented Ameri-
can airmen from hitting five out
of six of North Vietnam's key in-
dustrial targets." He added that
"nearly 90 per cent of the tar-
gets in the enemy's war-making
industrial base remain unscath-
ed."
-"Only three out of every 10
significant military targets have
by mid-1967 been struck by Unit-
ed States air power."

who got te Negro bloc vote in tne
first primary would lose a great
deal of support from whites in the
second and deciding primary.
There are no Negro candidates
in statewide contests, but more
than 100 have qualified for local
offices. Negro leaders have indi-
cated they are concentrating on
winning locally.
Charles Evers of the National
Association for the Advancement
of Colored People said before the
primary that his group would de-
lay endorsing anyone for governor.
No Statewide Endorsement
"We haven't come out statewide
for any particular candidate," he
said. "We're just going to let each
Negro vote his own choice in the
first primary."
He said he had been meeting
with other Negro leaders, hoping
, - 0 ,- A/I

4

--Associated Press
MISSISSIPPI REP. JOHN BELL WILLIAMS, a candidate for governor, casts his vote in his home-
town of -Raymond, Miss. during yesterday's Democratic primary. In the background are several
Negro voters waiting in line. A record number of Negro voters was expected to vote in the election.
T -1IENDING TONIGHT

i I I P of In U,.q e.ti an

versity ana elayea a decision on Petroleum Storage Targets
the final budget and fee struc- -About three-fourths of North
ture until more data could be Vietnam's petroleum storage tar-
ports ont hsubstantial sre o rce gets have not been attacked.
of the University wearuepared _Roughly one-third of North
and issed to the Regents on Mon Vietnam's total power targets and
ady. ieall enemy hydroelectric generat-
day. ing facilities are "still forbidden
A comparison was made between targets by orders from on high."
the University and other large col- -Sixty per cent of key targets
leges in the country to determine on the transportation network, all
whether the higher tuition would seaport targets and canal locks
be detrimental to competition for and most repair shops are off lim-

-17.j l)1 .Y K ..L ..% .

LX. 1 L4%-./~ &1X1.

high calibre students.
Ask Rulin s
For Familie

its.
in MSU Request
s' Tax Returns
ver of $354 for Michigan residents
iew whose families have an income
the under $11,800.
er- Students from a family earning
ing more would pay higher tuition
rn- costs on a sliding, upward scale
amounting to three per cent of
rn) the family income up to $16,666.
ler, Students from families earning
nal more than $16,666 would be re-
hat quired to pay the maximum tu-
hat ition of $501 for a three-term
rts year.
of Under the plan, parents are
given an option as to whether or
ion not they submitcopies of their
u-income tax returns However,
its' those who do not are required to
SU pay the maximum rate.
nth Pilch said he was not asking
can for an evaluation of the merits
of the sliding scale system, but
lch "only the legality of the require-
ap- ment to submit confidential in-
>py come tax reports as a condition of
s a enrollment."
me The Pilch letter followed Men-
ad- day action by House Majority
the Floor Leader William Hampton,
(R-Bloomfield Hills) who asked
hat Atty. Gen. Frank Kelly to rule
are on the constitutionality of the
ing tuition plan.

Defends Pirate Radio
DOUGLAS, Isle of Man (P) - his plan for United States inter-
The ancient Parliament of this vention and agreed to support a
holiday isle in the Irish Sea split move to refer the case to the
down the middle yesterday on Commonwealth instead.
whether to denounce Britain as a Clash Between Houses
colonial oppressor for trying to Ar
silence a pirate radio station an- Almost from the start a clash
chored off the island. began building up between mem-
bers of the elected House of Keys
In a chamber ringing with the and the Upper House, known as
cries of"British dictatorship!" and the Legislative Council. The Up-
coerags of "faLowrce"uemllyper. House is appointed except
fthL r H e n for five members elected by the
staged a walkout from a joint ses- House of Keys.
sion with the Upper House. Approval of both houses, sitting
Then, in isolation and in defi- jointly, was necessary to carry
ance of the Upper House, they jMid na seresolutio accus g
adopted a resolution calling on Mriadoal'sresolton"eaccnusn
prime ministers of the British the rights of self government" ur
Commonwealth 'to settle the is-Mthen
land's dispute with the British Manxmen.
mainland. Six Hours Debate
Bring Before UN After six hours of debate -
It was the climax of a daylong broken only for lunch and a spot
debate that produced a hasty end of afternoon tea-a vote was call-
to a much publicized plan to bring ed on Macdonald's watered down
Britain before the United Nations proposal asking the Common-
for trying to impose domestic poli- wealth prime ministers to inter-
cies on the island. vene.
The heart of the issue is Brit- Members of the House of Keys
ain's insistence that the Manx apjproved it 16 to 8. The Upper
government fall into line with House rejected it 10 to 0. British
British legislation banning pirate Gov. Sir Peter Stallard, presiding
radio stations effective Aug. 15. over the session, declared the res-
Radio Caroline olution was lost.
Many of the 50,000 islanders Whereupon the 24 members of
want to keep Radio Caroline North. the House of Keys walked out-
It's a successful pop pirate which some firm of purpose, others hesi-
operates from a ship moored off tant. And in their own chamber,
the island and bombards north- by the same vote of 16 to 8, they.
west England with pop music, adopted the resolution all over
commercials-and free plugs for again.

formerly
"La Vie
de Chateau" @f Ros0stanc.
NICOLE STEPHANE Presents CATHERINE DENEUVE a PIERRE BRASSEUR ' PHILIPPE NOIRET'- HENRI GARCIN
in JEAN-PAUL RAPPENEAU'S "A MATTER OF RESISTANCE" with MARY MARQUET and CARLOS THOMPSON
THURSDAY -
INGMAR BERGMAN'S
"PERSONA"
U-

1:00-3:05 -5:14-7 :15-9:3 0
24fb
se
TOMORRO-

holidays on the Isle of Man.
Roy Macdonald, an independ-
ent legislator, and leader of the
Manx rebels, immediately charged
Britain with "an act of aggres-
sion" against the island.
But Macdonald quickly dropped

U

3

STARTS NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
STARTS OX EASTERN THEATRES
TODAY OHVILLUGE
375 No.MAPLE RD.-"769-1300

ACRES OF
FREE
PARKING

A VERY
HANDY
MAN
with
ANOUK AIMEE
GIOVANNA RALLI
SHOW TIMES:

I

I

I RFING

1l' [ AWAii 11JI' !l; 1ii

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan