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August 04, 1967 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-08-04

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PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. ATIGTIS ' 4. 1~7'

CIRCULAT E PETITIONS:
Congressional Interns Debate

Study Blames Police
For Detroit Flareup

Collegiate Press Service
WASHINGTON - College stu-
dents working in Congressional
offices this summer have launch-
ed a debate over the Vietnam and
their right to express opinions
about It.
A "polite letter" to President
Johnson opposing the war is being
circulated among the 1,300 stu-
dients working as summer Interns
on Capitol Hill. There are also
ntei wich has already been
signatures.
out or boycott of President John-
son when he addresses the interns,
probably In late August.
It all started wvhen a group of
interns, led by Mark Green, who
works In the office of Sen. Jacob
Javits (R-NY) wrote a letter ex-
pressing dissatisfaction with the
w/ar. The aim of the letter, Its
sponsors say, is to "convince the
policy makers that some of the
most respected elements of our
young society are concerned with
our actions in Vietnam.'"
De-escalation
The letter urges de-escalation
of the war because of its effects
on domestic programs, including
a stifling of dissent and crisis in
confidence among the young
generation.
It~ does not- endorse specific al-
ternativ'es but says, "We join
with such distinguished Ameri-
cans as Senators Fulbright, Mc-
Govern, Hatfield, and Morse, and
John Kenneth Galbraith, George
Kenpnan, Arthur Schlessinger, Jr.,
an~d Martin Luther King, all of
whiom have offered. alternatives."
The'letter has raised the hack-
,les of seVeral Congressmen. $ep.
'Robert H. Michel (R-tll), a sup-
porter of the war, was the first
to alert his colleaguies to the pro-
posed letter. He' said he wanted
to save the administration "em-
barrassment" and warned that
dthe group is "using the prestige of
ou ffice to gt publicity."
Mi 1checesalso said he was con-
cerned about "young,- inexper-
ienced people who could find
themselves caught up in a move-
ment they' know very little about."
But. Green respohded that the

Il L~ 1. U IJJ~i I S~~.'L WASHINGTON (.PT-The direc- Waltham, Mass., emphasized in a
tor of a university center that has telephone interview that his re-
effot i no conectd wth uch s Dn Ewars (DCalf) avebeen studying the nation's riots search staff so far has more ques-
effot i no coneced ithsuchas on dwads -CaiO avesays early indications are that tions than answers about the July
groups as the Spring Mobilization supported the right of the interns Detroit police could have avoided 23 triggering event of the Detroit
for Peace and the Student Non- to sipeak out, Green says the op- the incident which triggered ra- riot and outbreaks in other cities.
Violent Coordinating Committee, position of Congressmen and cial riots last month. But he said he wondered why
which Michel said were groups Senators has cut the possible The director, John P. Spiegel, the Detroit police would stage a
with which Congressmen would number of signers of his petition also says he believes Detroit po- raid on an after-hours drinking
not want their interns involved, to "one-fifth of what it would lice probably allowed the riot to hangout in the early-morning
Green said his group is connected have been." He 'says many offices flare out of control by using too hours of a Sunday and an area
only with Vietnam Summer, a are telling interns not to sign little force in the initial stages. with riot potential.
loose association of anti-war and many others who would sign Spiegel, who heads the Lem- He also asked: why would they
efforts. have been scared away by the berg Center for the Study of Viol- conduct the raid routinely and
Though some Congressmen, such controversy. ence at Brandeis University In without extra police ready to help?
sh o l nt ha ve c onducted su ch
digha yacou shoudo ave had
ofat a migt follow.
- ing.
~ Spiegel, a professor of social
psychiatry at Brandeis, said, "My
feeling is that most of the precip-
* itating events either could have
4 ~~ !~$X . ~ - ~ <..~,been avoided or the events imme-
-4.. diately following could have been
conducted in such a way that the
~ confrontation phase never would
i have happened."
Research Team
Spiegel heads a team of 12 re-
S- searchers who have been study-
ing riots since last September on
a three-year, $294,000 federal
grant. Results of the study, the
second Spiegel has conducted
riots, are to be made ava#Iable to
/ the President's Commission on
Civil Disorders.
Spiegel said police confronted
with a potential riot "tend to
-Associated Press veer between two extremes " He
said "the first is the sort of
SENAT HEA INGShands-off approach - which ii
think is what happened in Detroit

-Associated Press
Phan Khac Suu, right, a civilian candidate in the South Vietnamese presidential race and his run-
ning mate, Phan Quang Dan, hold a news conference in Saigon at the opening of their campaign
yesterday. Dan called for de-escalation of the war and negotiations with the Viet Cong.
LIT E RARY COLLEGE:
PassFailSyste of Grading

(Continued from Page 1)

Captain John Sorace, left, and Lieutenant Robert Hill of the Nas
ment, were the first witnesses called yesterday by the, Senate Jud
are holding hearings concerning the House-approved anti-riot bill.
NO TIME EXTENSION:
Mihia Lgiltuw

hvilie, Tennessee Police Depart- in the first day or so-and the
iciary Committee. The senators other is to crushi the rioters.
"If police stand around doing
-nothing . . . they're inviting loot-
ing and stealing. People are say-
ing to themselves: 'The police
aren't even watching. We can get
away with this'."
It d o~truS iBut he said if the police come
in with overwhelming force, the
Negroes "tend to have their feel-
ings of injustice confirmed. They
The gasoline and automobile see the police as dealing with them
tax increases, already approved by violently and injustly."
the Senate, passed the House Iely Siglsi oie
Wednesdy codurereunced in should shlow up immediately to
the Senate for cocrec ndemonstrate the presence of the
House amendments. law and make arrests for any
However, the Senate failed to violations. But he said arrests
agree on the amendments prior should be made in a fair and
to adjournment, killing the bills even-handed way.,

under the regular grading sys-
tem.
One girl who took a course in
Chinese Literature on pass-fail
was disturbed. "I got an A in the
lousy course. I would have had my
first four-point average if I hadn't
signed up for pass-fail," she
mourns.
It seems that in at least some
cases the old habits of study and
grade-consciousness are slow to
change. One girl commented "I
tried not to study, but I couldn't
help myself. I stayed up all night
cramming for the final." She got
an A in the course, but her tran-
script shows only a P.
Part of the trouble that stu-
dents seem to be having in read-
justing to pass-fail may be caused

by the fact that the students who
choose pass-fail generally have
a higher grade-point average than
those who don't.
In fact, the averages of the 13
per cent of the eligible seniors
who chose the option was almost
three tenths of a point higher
than the average of those who did
not choose it (3.14 vs. 2.85).
Although the University's ex-
periment with pass-fail is pre-
liminary results are encouraging
to its proponents.

But the program, and others
like it, is still under attack from
both sides of the fence. While
some are disturbed by the lack
of letter grades, others want the
system expanded to include all
courses for every student in all
umiversities.
The debate goes on.
TOMORROW: A reviewv of the
arguments for abolishing and
for expanding the pass-fail pro-
gram.

LANSING ( P) - The Michigan
Legislature adjourned its 1967
regular session yesterday but fail...
ed to approve a $60 million pack-
age of gasoline and automobile
tax increase proposals.
The Legislature adjourned de-
spite an attempt by the House
to approve a 24-hour extension to

U.S. Steel HiKes Tin Pries
Bethlehem May Follow Suit

PITTSBURGH, Pa. (/P)-Giant
U.S. Steel Corp. raised tin plate
prices by 2.7 per cent~ yesterday.
It was the latest In a ser~ies of
piecemeal moves which have hiked
prices on half of steelmakers'
shipments in a year.
Tin plate, which accounts for
6.5 per cent of industry ship-
ments, is used mainly in cans and
containers.
National Steel Corp. started the
Latest round of increase Tuesday.
-Wheeling Steel Corp. followed
suit. Bethlehem Steel Corp., sec-
end only to U.S. Steel in tin plate
production, said it is studying the
Sprice hike.
- The increases are effective next
Last Augut poducei's pushed
21 per cent. Sheet andicsrip ac-
counts for a third of the industry's
shipments.
Prices went up about 2 per cent
on stainless steel in November and
tubular steel products in January.
The latest increase was 25 cents
per base box, or sheet, of conven-
tional tin plate and 15 cents per
base box ,on double rolled. Prices
on tin plate range from $5.60 to
$10.26 per sheet under the new'
schedules.
In marked contrast to a general
price hik-e which the federal gov-
ernment rolled back *in 1962,
Washington has had little to say
about the latest round.
Ackley
Gardener Ackley, chairman of
the President's Council of Econo-
mic Advisers, termed the sheet and
3trip boost an "irresponsible ac-
tion," but there's been no com-
ment since.
U.S. Steel didn't explain its ac-
tion, but National President
I "GREAT

finish work on a gasoline and li-
cense fee boost.
With minutes to go before the
scheduled noon adjournment, the
House approved the 24-hour ex-
tension and sent it to the Senate.
SHowever, Senators were unable
to muster necessary votes to give
the proposal immediate consider-
ation.
Romney
Gov. George Romney. wandered
onto the floor of the House and
Senate for the first time in his
five years as governor and con-
gratulated legislators for *'a diffi-
cult session but a successful ses-
sion."
Romney walked into the Senate
chamber as the gavel sounded
final adjournment.
He told lawmakers in both
chambers, "I want to congratulate
you for being a responsible Legis-
lature.'' He singled out for special
praise the new members who had
voted earlier in the session for
Michigan's first state income tax.,
Rebuilding
He also urged lawmakers to
think about "the terrible tragedy"
of last week's Detroit upheaval,
and consider ways to finance re-
building of the damaged areas
and prevent a repetition of the
riots.

Phone 434-0130
6ve Oan>~ CARPENTER ROAD

The rea's Finest Die-I s eas
Washtenow Rd. on Carpenter.
BOX OFFICE
OPEN 8:00 P.M.

for this session.
The House and Senate return
Oct. 10 for a special fall session
called by Romney to take up
court reorganization and in-
creased appropriations for the
state Civil Rights Commission.

~azWA~!d ~

--NOW--
Tonight at 7 and 9 P.M.
DIAL 8-64 16

F IRST
RUN

NOW SHOWING

RUN

?IIJ1'&'K4r~" 'N

George A. Stinson said tin plate
prices were unchanged from 1958
through 1965, even though tin
prices double. In November, 1965,
the industry raised some tin plate
prices and reduced others.
He said National's labor costs
have increased 42 per cent since
1958, including a three per cent
hike which went into effect Tues-
day under the industry's 1965 con-
tract with the United Steelwor'kers
Union.
Steel profits were also down
sharply the first half of this yea'r
compared to 1966. The dip
amounted to nearly half for many
firms.

presents
A RSE NIC
AND
OL D LACE
Starring
AYGRANT
JOS E PH INE H U LL
in that WILD,
WACKY Comedy-
The fi rst of the
"SICK H UMOR"
Films
F R IDAY & SA TU RDAY
7:00 & 9:05 P.M.
Architecture Auditorium
, ST IL L ON LY 5Oc

REIMENIED FIR MAIRE AIIECS Shown at 9:25 Only CQ
ALSO-SHOWN AT 1:0 ONLY
TONRANDALL.." "s ' *0
-~ -..'fooooooooooooo

A

--PLUS--- ----PLUS
"RIDE A WHITE HORSE" "HIGHWAY RUNNERY"

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
. ..., ...........-........................isim a nN #

The Daily Officialf Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumies no editor-
ial responsibiilty. Notices should be.
RoomU3564 AdmiitatoBlg be
fore 2 p.m. of tlie day preceding
pubication and by 2 p.m. Friday '
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Studnt organization notIces are not
inlormation call 764-9270.
FRIDAY, A UGUS T 4
Bureau of Industrial Ifelations Sem-
inar-'"Evaluating the Effectiveness of
*t Personnel-Inustrial RelationsDe
to 5 p.m.
Judicial working Group of the Presi-
dential Commission-Meeting at 1 p.m.
today in Room 3516 SAB.-Opcn.
Audio-Visual Education Center Film
Preview-"Red Balloon" and "A very
HELD OVER FORI

special Day": Multipurpose Room, Un-
dergraduate Library, 1:30 p.m.
Astronomical Colloquium: Fri.. Aug.
4, 2 p.m., Room 807 Physics-Astroniomy
Bdg. Dr. Petebr Bonheimer rinceton
"Dynamical -Phases of Eary Stellar Evo-
lution."
Cinema Guild-Cary Grant and Jose-
phine Hull in "Arsenic and Old Lace":
Architecture Aud., 7 and 9:05 p.m.
School of Music and Dept. of Spech
Opera-Mozart's "Don Giovanni": Ly-
dia Mendelssohn 'Theatre, 8 p.m.
(Continued on Page 5)

-L-

formerly
"La Vie
de Chateau"oReitne
NICOLE STEPHANE Presents CATHERINE DENEUVE . PIERRE BRASSEUR - PHIUiPPE NOIRET . HENRI GARCIN
in JEAN-PAUL RAPPENEAU'S "A MATTER OF RESISTANCE" with MARY MARGUET and CAR LOS THOMPSON

NOW SHOWING

H E LD OVE R -4thn Week

CINEMA

II

presents

for the
Populio
explosion!
serviCed
* ~VERVtown.
PRESENTED BY ANGELO RIZZOLI
ANOUK AIMEE UGO TOGNAZZI GIOVANNA RALLI
WiTH PIERRE BRASSEUR DIRECTED BY ALESSANDRO BLASETTI
SHOW TIMES: Mon. thru Thurs. 7-9

JEAN
SEB ERG

WA RR EN
BEATTY

PETE R
FONDA

in ROBERT ROSSEN'S

LILIT H

(1965)

"One of the most hanutingly beautiful films
years. As impressive as Sundays 'and Cybele and
valid as David and Lisa."

in
as

- -JIM, PEGGY, AND DORIS
"Has considerablesmerit !" I
STANLEY KAUFFMAN, New Republic

-- r ~A* 'I* U V~' -

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