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July 22, 1967 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-07-22

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SATURDAY, JULY 22,1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

Algerians
Extradite
Tshombe
Former Premier
Must Return to Congo
Under Death Sentence
ALGIERS (Al) - Algeria's Su-
preme Court approved yesterday
the Congo's request for extradition
of Moise Tshombe, the Congolese
ex-premier condemned to death by
a military' court of his country-
men last March 13 on a charge of
treason.
Facing the prospect of execution
by a firing squad upon return to
the Congo, Tshombe looked grim
and worried.
"I'm the victim of an American
Central Intelligence Agency plot,"
he told the court before the judges
announced their ruling. He did not
elaborate on that claim.
se Time of Return Unknown
"If you decide to deliver _me
into the hands of the Congolese
government, I will accept your de-
cision," he said. "I am a man. I
am a' chief of state. I will go. But
the responsibility for my fate will
rest with this court."
There was no announcement as
to when he might be returned.
The Congo's president, Lt. Lgen.
Joseph D. Mobutu, could commute
the sentence, but he was behind
both the ouster of Tshombe as
Premier Oct. 13, 1965, and the sub-
sequent treason trial, staged while
Tshombe was living in exile in
Madrid.
Abortive Uprising
A hijacked plane landed the 47-
year-old Tshombe here three
weeks ago, putting him under ar-
rest in a move quickly followed by
an abortive uprising in eastern
Congo cities sparked by white
mercenaries and Katangan troops
who once served under his com-
mand.
The hijacking, executed on a
flight oyer Spain's Balearic Is-
lands, was reported to have been
the work of one or more men in
his own entourage who hoped to
collect a reward from the Congo.
Katanga Province
The main' c h a r g e against
Tshombe in Kinshasa, the capital
formerly known as Leopoldville,
P was his attempt to lead copper-
Vich Katanga Province to inde-
pendence after Belgium freed the
Congo in 1960. U.N. troops helped
the Congolese army crush that
secession.
Tshombe's Algerian lawyer, Ab-
dessamed Ben Abdallah, argued
against extradition in a hearing
before the Supreme Court Wed -
nesday on the ground that the al-
leged offenses were of a political
nature rather than c o m m o n
crimes.
Among the crimes attributed to
Tsombe was the murder of leftist
Patrice Lumumba, the. Congo's
first premier. He was slain after
he was flown as a prisoner to con-.
finement in Katanga Province in
1961. Katangan authorities de-
clared Lumumba had escaped and
villagers had killed him.
Abdallah told the Supreme Court
Wednesday that the former pre-
mier had nothing to do with Lu-
mumba's death. ,

Minneapolis BACK TO SECURITY COUNCIL:

Calls Out

-Associated Press
TROUBLED MINNEAPOLIS AREA
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. - Firemen battle the flames which swept a grocery store in the Plymouth
Avenue area. This Negro area has been the scene of disturbances for two straight nights. More
than 300 firemen and every piece of equipment the city owns were used in the nocturnal battle
against fires.
NEWARK CONFERENCE-
Black Power Meeting Aims
Self-Help Progains,' Unity

State Guard
Needed to Contain
Further Violence;
Aid Local Police
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. (i-Na-
tional Guardsmen moved into
Minneapolis last night to help
curb violence on the city's pre-
dominantly Negro North Side.
Gov. Harold LeVender ordered
out 600 guardsmen, doubled the
number requested by Minne-
apolis Mayor Arthur Naftalin.
The mayor had said the groups
were needed both to contain pos-
sible further violence and to give
hard-pressed Minneapolis police
a breather.
Two Nights of Violence
The North Side has been the
scene of rock-throwing, car-tip-
ping and wholesale fire-starting
for two nights.
There have been no fatalities.
A dozen persons have been in-
jured-one seriously. Police have
made nearly 40 arrests.
"Tension is high and our men
are tired," said the mayor as he
voiced h o p e s the guardsmen
would help cool the violence.
Minneapolis has a Negro popu-
lation of less than 3 per cent, but
many are concentrated in semi-
slum sections of the North Side.
It is an area of old frame homes,
some shared by several families.
Negroes Distressed
Negro spokesmen cite living
conditions and lack of job oppor-
tunities as linked to the outbreak.
But Naftalin said "Ninety-nine
per cent of the Negro community
are terribly distressed by these in-
cidents. The people behind the
incidents are beyond our reach."
The Democratic mayor's call
for troops - and the Republican
governor's doubling of his bid-
came at mid-day yesterday when
the area was relatively quiet.
Both.. nighttime outbreaks have
been post-midnight affairs, put
in order by police shows of force.
Police "have yet to fire their
first shot," Naftalin said in prais-
ing their restraint.
The governor canceled all trips
and appointments through Sun-
day, to keep in touch with de-
velopments.
n n Phone 434-0130 I

General Assembly prepared yes-{
terday to adjourn its five-week-
old emergency session and toss
the Middle East problem back to
the Security Council.
It was the only course open to
the delegates after the Arabs tor-
pedoed a last minute peace plan
presented to them by the Soviet
Union.
Sweden, Finland and Austria
submitted a procedural resolution
for adjournment and referral of
the Middle East issue back to the
council.
Vote Delayed

_ :.

sought to merge a request for an opposition to the Soviet mo
Israeli troop withdrawal with a re- They gained support of others, :
quest for Arab recognition of Is- cluding Egypt. and the Russia
rae!. But the Arabs, who have re- had no other choice but to give '
fused to recognize Israel for 19 The emergency session was cc
years, gave it a flat turndown. vened on June 17 at the requ
Troop Withdrawal of the Soviet Union, which si
According to the plan the as- Premier Alexet N. Kosygin to N9
sembly would ask for an Israeli York to demand condemnation
withdrawal without delay to posi- Israel for aggression, war repa:
tions held before the Middle East tions to the Arabs from Israel a
war started June 5. Similarily, it immediate and unconditiot
would ask all UN members to ac- troop withdrawals.
knowledge without delay that all On July 4. the assembly dea
countries in the Middle East have locked on rival resolutions, o
the right to independent national from the Latin Americans and I
status in an atmosphere of peace other from the nonaligned cov
and security. tries, seeking Israeli withdraw
Quakers Face Federal
Penalty for Aid Poliy

NEWARK, N.J. (A)-Black Power
delegates at a national unity con-
ference' reflected yesterday a som-
ber mood of growing Negro aliena-
tion from white society and an
overriding desire to develop work-
able, self-help programs.
Nearly 600 participants in the
all-Negro conference met in closed
workshops.
Deposed New York congressman
Adam Clayton Powell was expected
to attend the meeting. However he
has decided against it and will
hold a news conference today on
Bimini, island sources reported
yesterday.
Topic Not Disclosed
A friend of Powell's told the
Associated Press Powell would hold
the conference at 11 a.m. He did
not say what Powell would talk
about.
Powell is honorary chairman of
the Black Power conference which
he had a leading part in organ-
izing.
Delegates to the conference,
drawn from a wide range of Negro
views, worked in a strictly busi-
ness atmosphere. Outside the ses-
sions, in interviews, casual talk
and news conferences, some par-
ticipants voiced anger, bitterness
and distrust of white America.
"It's too late, too late to rem-
edy the racial situation in this
country," said a well-known dele-
gate.
Exclude Whites
The conference formally voted
to exclude whites, including news-
men, Thursday night and called on
participants to refuse individual
iterviews.
The delegate said racial aliena-
tion had gone past "that point of

Arabs Block Soviet Peace Plan
General Assembly Session End
UNITED NATIONS UP) - The sultation with the United States, Algeria and Syria led the A

no return" and the future holds
more violence, perhaps guerrilla
type actions by some of the new
"revolutionaries."
In the workshops, however, the
dominant concern was how to de-
velop positive, workable programs
and involve the nation's Negroes in
a strong, united movement to bet-
ter their lot.
One session turned into a dis-
cussion of organizing to "fight
political and police pressures."
There was considerable criticism
of existing Negro leadership in
city slums, with emphasis on the
National Association for the Ad-
vancement of Colored People.
"There are too many old leaders
trying to stay on and too many
young leaders hustling to get
ahead," one delegate said.

Another man said Newark's Ne-
groes, about one-half of the city's
400,000 population had a chance to
elect a mayor last year but were
not organized.
"City Hall could have been two-
thirds black," he said.
Ten judges working in tempo-
rary courtrooms processed bail ap-
plications for the remainder of
more than 1,000 persons arrested
during Newark's five-day seige of
Negro rioting that ended Monday.
Mayor Hugh J. Addonizio's of-
fice announced that he would meet
next Monday in Newark with Sar-
gent Shriver, director of the U.S.-
Office of Economic Opportunity.
Shriver will look into charges that
the local anti-poverty agency,
United Community Corp., contri-
buted to the violence.

world New
By The Associated Press
CAIRO, Ill.-City officials, fac-
ed with a Sunday deadline to meet
sweeping demands by young Ne-
groes, moved quickly yesterday in
an effort to avert renewed violence
by Negroes and head off a possi-
ble white backlash.
Spokesmen for an estimated 100
young Negroes living in the Pra-
mid Court housing development
warned the officials Thursday they
had 72 hours to meet demands for
new job opportunities, organized
recreation programs and an end to
alleged police brutality.
The Negro spokesmen implied
the alternative to compliance
might be more shooting and fire
bombing such as broke out Sun-
day night and Tuesday night.
WASHINGTON -- The govern-
ment reported yesterday a deficit
of $9.9 billion in the administra-
tive budget for the fiscal year
which ended last June 30, more
than $1 billion below the amount
officials estimated during May.
The deficit was the largest in
eight years and was the second
highest peacetime deficit in his-
tory.
* * * '
CAPE KENNEDY, Fla.-Ameri-
ca's Lunar Explorer spacecraft,
built to scout for radiation haz-

1I
's Roundup
ards facing moon-bound astro-
nauts, successfully shifted its
pointing direction yesterday as it
aimed to ride into orbit around
the moon today.
The windmill-shaped radiation
sentry, officially named Explorer
35, fired a tin gas jet as it sped
through space to slightly change
the pointing direction of its retro-
rocket.
SAN FRANCISCO-Mrs. Esther
Pike filed a divorce action yes-
terday against Episcopal Bishop
James A. Pike, controversial
church leader. They have been
married 23 years.
Mrs. Pike's petition charged
mental cruelty.
WASHINGTON-A U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals yesterday stayed
at least until July 31 the merger
of ABC and the International Tel-
ephone and Telegraph Corp. The
consolidation had been scheduled
to become effective next Tues-
day.
Ruling on a Justice Department
request for delay, a three-judge
panel directed ABC and ITT to
file before 4 p.m. (EDT) next
Thursday their answers to a de-
partment motion for an injunc-
tion to block the merger until
the court rules on its overall va-
lidity.

,
I,

DAILY OFFICIA L BULLETIN ,'r,1:: .
WW E R M M .:ti"y '. M . y":" " .M"' ;::{:{":{ t {'4 ' 1,x :::"4:': ' :'' ' ' : ::i"."f""': :''.":{""":"::{{: "': ::

FIRST OPEN 8:00 P.M. FIRST
RUN NOW SHOWING RUN
Shown at 9:35 & 1:35
M s din
ax
Also Shown at 11:35 Only
44ag
PLUS-"RODEO DAREDEVILS"
COLOR CARTOON
Dial 8-6416
ENCORE TRIUMPHS!
Whenever
they talk
about
great
suspense
motion
pictures,
they always seem
to mention
DIABOLIQUE.

A vote was delayed when the
assembly decided to adjourn at
6:38 p.m. for one hour. But de-
spite Arab opposition to the pro-
cedural resolution, its approval
was regarded as certain.
Arab opposition to the resolu-
tion reflected bitterness over what
the Arabs described as an attempt
to cover up failure of the assem-
bly to achieve any kind of suc-
cess in dealing with the after-
math of the Israeli-Arab war.
The procedural adjournment
resolution was presented by Swed-
ish Ambassador Sverker Astrom.
Reconvene When Necessary
It stipulated that the assembly
would adjourn temporarily and
authorize its president, Abdul Rah-
man Pazhwak of Afghanistan, to
reconvene it "as and when neces-
sary."
Diplomats generally expected
that there would be no summons
to reconvene, and that the Middle
East problem would be carried for-
ward to the next regular session
of the assembly opening Sept. 19.
In a speech before the vote, Al-
banian delegate Halim Budq lash-
ed at both the United States and
the Soviet Union, accusing them
of conniving in secret to defeat
the Arab countries.
Recognition of Israel
The Albanian, regarded as the
voice of Red China at the United
Nations, said the assembly was
being asked to "save the face" of
the Soviet Union.
The Soviet proposal presented
to the Arabs privately after con-
presents
CHARLIE
CHAPLIN'S
Burlesque
on
Carmen
First Ann Arbor
Showing
Plus GLENN TYRON
and BEN TURPIN in
Selected Short Subjects
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
7:00 & 9:05 P.M,
ARCH ITECTURE E
AUDITORIUM
ST ILL ONLY 50c '
Here we
come
, again
with a
s Heigh-
Heigh-
SHo!
I.

5. t
1 x{h-r
:;. ::

PHILADELPHIA (P)-A Quaker
task unit yesterday pushed plans
for another shipment of medical
supplies for civilian war casual-
ties in North Vietnam in the face
of threatened federal prosecution.
"We realize there is the possi-
bility of imprisonment," said
Lawrence Scott, 58, the leader of
the project. "But we think the'
government wants to avoid that,
although some super-patriots are
pushing for it."
Boat Commissioned
From its, headquarters here,
the organization, "Quaker Action
Group," is screening volunteers
to form a new crew for the 50-
foot ketch, Phoenix, chartered for
a year's use in the medical trans-
port operation.
It is the same vessel by which
the unit carried an initial $10,000
medical cargo from Japan to
North Vietnam last March. 'Pass-
ports of the previous crew were
ordered revoked.
In Washington Thursday, offi-
cials of the U.S. Treasury Depart-
ment said it has recommended
prosecution of the group under
the Trading with the Enemy Act,

NOON BOOK -DISCUSSION
TUESDAYS
MICHIGAN UNION
ANDERSON ROOM D
SJLY 25
LIVING WITH SEX: THE STUDENT'S DILEMMA
REV.,RICHARD HETTLINGER
THOMAS LOGAN, Doctoral Candidate:
Education-Psychology
AUGUST 1
A PROPHETIC MINORITY: JACK NEWFIELD
PROF. ROBERT SKLAR, Ph.D., Dept. of History
DISCUSSIONS FREE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
LUNCHEON Available $.50-Sandwich, Fruit, Beverage
(ALL BOOKS AVAILABLE IN PAPERBACK)
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, OFFICE OF RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS

which provides penalties of it
years in jail and a $10,000-fine
for violation.
The Justice Department sai
the case is under review.
"This is a concern," Scott said
"But we're going ahead. In term
of the purpose of our lives, ane
of helping people who have beer
injured by our bombs, this is o
witness that ought to be engagee
in."
Sail in August
He said sending of the ne'
medical shipment still depends 01
approval from the North Viet
namese Red Cross, corresponden(
with which is being handled froir
abroad to avoid government in
terception. Approval is antici
pated.
The intended sailing is expecte4
to be in late August or early Sep
tember.
"When people are being bombec
and are bleeding, it's a religion:
right and a religious duty to hell
them, whoever/ they are," Scot
said, echoing a long-standini
Quaker tradition of aiding wa
victims on all sides in any con-
flict.

5.-

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility, Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices' may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-270
SATURDAY, JULY 22

Events Sunday
School of Music Recital - Ernest
Cramer, Violinist: School of Music Re-
cital Hal, 2:30 p.m.
School of Music Recital-Marilyn Ma-
son, Organist: Organ Studio 2110, School
of Music, 4:30 p.m'
Dept. of Gerontology-"Twentieth An-
nual Conference on Aging": Registra-
tion, Michigan Union Lobby, 5 p.m.
School of Music Concert-Jack Fort-
ner, conductor, "Contemporary Direc-
tions": School of Music Recital Hall,
8:30 p.m.

pr

University Musical Society Fair Lane
Festival-Stratford Festival Orchestra
D ry C n r of Canada-Oscar Shumsky, director of
music: Dearborn Campus, the Univer-
Cinema Guild-Charlie Chaplin in sity of Michigan, 8:30 p.m.
"Burlesque on Carmen": Architecture'
Aud., 7 and 9:05 p m. EventsiMonday
School of Music Recital-Marilyn Ma- Dept. of Gerontology Conference -
son, Organi"t: Organ studio2110, 8:30 "Twentieth Annual Conference on Ag-
p.m. f (Continued on Page 4)

CINEMA 1U

I

I

HELD OVER-3rd Week
IN THE TRADITION OF "DEAR JOHN"
!e
makes 'DEAR JOHN' look like a
fairy tale.. Would you believe
'VIRGINIA WOOLF'looking like a
Sunday qo-to-meetin'?" -W.rld Journal Tribun*

I

presents

J. M. SYNGE'S

J. 11'" ' :". :":": s:ti:':s'

"MEN

BE WARNED-THE
GIRLS IN THIS
PICTURE ARE
GUARANTEED TO
STEAM HORN-RIMMED

"WIVES
WILL PROBABLY
LAUGH TOO. THE
NAME OF THE GAME
IS INFIDELITY
AMERICAN-STYLE"

I

7e PLAYBOY
OF THE
WESTERN WORLD
(1963)
In color with Siobhan McKenna
and the Abbey Theatre Players
"At last, oneoue has had the good
sense to make a ripe and rousing
film of Synge's great comedy! Every lover
of Irish Theatre should see this

4 '
,.

GLASSES"
-Doily News *
Zd WEEK'
GI~j~f 2c

Seven Arts Productions presents
Robert Dhery AS
N D4-8YLA'. -

o" RADLEY H. METZGER presents
-,-a-oinailmESSYPERSSON
SHOW TIMES: Fri. 7-9-1 1,

11

I

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