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July 21, 1967 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-07-21

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FRIDAY, JULY 21,1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JULY 21, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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WASHINGTON (A) - Two of
President Johnson's top advisers
will take off Saturday on a rapid-
fire mission to six Vietnam-allied
nations in a bid for more of their
troops in the war, the White House
announced yesterday. The pros-
pects are not bright.
Gen. Maxwell D. Taylor, retired
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Stuff and former ambassador to
South Vietnam, and Washington
lawyer Clark Clifford will .sound
out the Asian allies also on a pos-
sible summit meeting in the fall.
White House press secretary
George Christian told newsmen
the mission, to last somewhat over
a week, is a follow-up to the re-
cent on-the-spot study conducted
by Secretary of Defense Robert S.
McNamara in Vietnam.
McNamaTa
When McNamara returned last
week, he said additional troops are
going to be needed there and that,
"in consultation with our allies,
we will meet those needs as they
arise."
The United States has about
465,000 men in Vietnam and this
force is expected to swell as high
as 550,000 by next July.
Observers familiar with political
trends in the various allied coun-
tries said Taylor and Clifford will
have a tough going in trying to
persuade South Korea, the Philip-
pines, Thailand, Australia and
New Zealond to send more com-
bat troops to the war.

Altogether, these five countries
are represented by some 53,000
troops in South. Vietnam, with a
few thousand more due to come in
the months ahead. -
Among problems and pressures
adverse to U.S. aims are Britain's
decision to' pull back its forces
from Malaysia and Singapore,
mounting North Korean probes
along the uneasy border with
South Korea, a worrisome Iluk
Communist. activity in the Philip-
pines and a Red insurgency threat
in Thailand.
Clifford and Taylor will confer
also with South Vietnamese lead-

Viet]
ers in Saigon, but they have shown
signs of reluctance to increase
their forces, which now total some
700,000 including regulars and
militia.
White House spokesman Chris-
tian said Taylor, now a special
presidential consultant, and Clif-
ford, who serves as chairman of
the Foreign Intelligence Advisory
Board, would discuss "all aspects
of the situation" in Vietnam with
allied leaders. He added that the
two would be "looking toward the
possibility of a future summit
meeting at an appropriate time."
The first Vietnam summit con-

roopS
ference was held in Manila last
October.
Christian said a site for a pos-
sible follow-up heads-of-govern-
ment meeting this fall has not
been decided. Bangkok, Thailand,
has been mentioned.
With 46,000 troops in the coun-
try, South Korea is the biggest
military contributor to the Viet-
nam war, outside of the United
States and South Vietnam.
South Korean leaders, it is be-
lieved, would have trouble selling
to their people another increment
of Korean fighting troops for the
Southeast Asian war.

By Abortion
NEW YORK (k)-Nearly a mil-,
lion American women will have
illegal abortions this year, Plan-
ned Parenthood Federation of
America, Inc., predicted yester-
day. A thousand or more may die
in the process. And it will cost
millions of dollars.
The New York City unit of
Planned Parenthood asked, Gov.,
Nelson A. Rockefeller this week to
appoint a commission to study the
abortion problems in New York
State with an estimated total of
100,000 illegal abortions a year.
Estimates of the number of
abortions nationally range from
300,000 up to two million a year.
Planned Parenthood estimates a
million and notes that only 10,000
to 20,000 are legal.
The death rate from abortion
has fallen off since the 1930s,
doctors agreed. But they add they
cannot begin to estimate how
many abortion-related deaths es-
caped official notice.
The New York City unit of
Planned Parenthood said more
than 2,000 women die in the state
every year from criminal abor-
tions and thousands of others suf-
fer complications.
But Dr. Christopher Tietze,
medical director of the National
Committee for Maternal Health,
says that figure is "a gross ex-
aggeration." He estimates deaths
nationally from abortion at 1,000
a year, compared to 2,700 official-
ly registered in 1933.

'TENSE SITUATION':
Prospect for UN Peace Plan
On Middle. East Appears Dim

.

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (A') -
The General Assembly took a 24-
hour break yesterday in a final
effort to avoid complete failure
in producing any kind of Middle
East peace plan. But after almost
five weeks of debate, prospects
for success were slim.
Delegates to the 122-nation
assembly met for five minutes
after a three-day recess, then de-
cided to convene again this after.-

orld News Roundup
By The Associated Press antitrust subcommittee has been
WASHINGTON - Sen. Clifford ordered by Chairman Emanuel
P. Hansen (R-Wyo) said yester- Celler (D-NY).
day that American-built ships, The investigation was requested
owned by the U.S. government, by two members of the subcom-
are being used by the Soviet Un- nittee,, Reps. Peter J. Rodino (D-
Ion to carry war supplies to North NJ) and William T. Cahill (R-
Vietnam. NJ), who said Congress should
He called it a ludicrous situa- consider whether insurance com-
tion and "another example of the panies should remain exempt from
confusion and duplicity that has the antitrust laws.
apparently become a part of our ---
foreign policy." Phone 434-0130
Hansen said the Russians ob-
tained the ships as part of a World
War II lend-lease agreement. They
never have been paid for, Han-
sen said, and the Soviet Union is Ene p, CARPENTER RAD
obligated to return them upon the F.
request of the U.S. government. I RST OPEN 8i0 P.M. FIRST
* * * RUN NOW SHOWING RUN

noon to see if they could wind up'
the emergency special session that
began on June 171.
The Soviet Union, which had
asked for the special session, was
still trying to salvage something
it could refer to as an accomplish-
ment.
Gromyko
Andrei A. Gromyko, the Soviet
foreign minister, invited U.S.
Ambassador Arthur J. Goldberg
to tea late Wednesday. This was
followed yesterday with an hour-
long meeting of Goldberg and
Anatoly F. Dobrynin, Soviet am-
bassador to Washington, who has
been playing a role also in Middle
East talks. U.S. sources declined
to comment on the meetings, but
there was no indication of agree-
ment on basic U.S.-Soviet dif-
ferences.
Finland, Austria and Sweden
were prepared to submit a resolu-
tion tossing the problem back to
the Security Council but also
authorizing Abdul Rhaman Pazh-
wak of Afghanistan, the assembly
president, to reconvene the as-
sembly "as and when necessary."

But the sponsors bumped into
opposition from the Arab dele-
gates, who spoke out against
what they described as attempts
to gloss over failure of the assem-
bly to demand unconditional
withdrawal of Israeli forces from
Arab territory won in the war.
Under the resolution, the coun-
cil would be asked to consider
"the tense situation in the Middle
East as a matter of urgency."
Diplomatic sources said the
Arabs objected to that as too mild
a description of a situation; the
Arabs said it amounted to a threat
to world peace.
Ambassador Max Jakobson of
Finland told the assembly it might
be useful to continue negotiations
a while longer. He suggested the
meeting be recessed until 3 p.m.
today, and there was no objec-
tion.
Some diplomatic sources said
there was still faint hope of work-
ing out agreement on a Latin-
American resolution that spoke of
a troop withdrawal and an end
to the state of war between Israel
and the Arabs.

I
k
I
1

presents
CHARLIE
CHAPLIN'S
Burlesque
on
Carmen
First Ann Arbor
Showing
Plus GLENN TYRON
and BEN TURPIN in
Selected Short Subjects
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
7:00 & 9:05 P.M.
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
in=STILL ONLY 50c

L

I

TOKYO-Kyodo news se'vice:
reported from Peking yesterday
that two rival bands of Red
Guards clashed throughout the'
night and into the' morning at
the Hsin Chiao Hotel, catering ex-
clusively to foreigners. r I
Several Red Guards were in-a
jured but 100 Japanese guests,
mostly traders and newspaper cor-
respondents, were not molested,
although elevator and room serv-
ices were disrupted.
About 15 unarmed soldiers of
the army were called in to quell
the fighting.
WASHINGTON-An investiga-
tion of the auto insurance indus-
-try by the staff of the House

Shown at 9:35 & 1:35
as*
Also Shown at 11:35 Only
PLUS--"RODEO DAREDEVILS"
COLOR CARTOON

-SIGN UP NOW!Y
UNION-LEAGUE UNION-LEAGUE
SINGLE'S TENNIS TOURNAMENT
for MEN and WOMEN-Students and Professors
TROPHIES and PRIZES!
Sign up and information: UAC Offices, 2nd floor, Union
DEADLINE: JULY 23

L

r

---"

2nd WEEK

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Fourteen Famous Swingers Give You The Do's And Dont's
For The Man With A Roving Eye And The Urge To Stray!
RULE 2'S
Rem ber e osuch
Thig s Prfcthideawayi

HELD OVER-3rd Week
IN THE TRADITION-OF "DEAR JOHN"
9.9
makes 'DEAR JOHN' look like a
fairy tale. Would you believe
'VIRGINIA WOOLF' looking like a
Sunday go-to-meetin'?"- WorldournaTribun

RADLEY H. METZGER presents
f.f. r 19.aw omtfh , ESSY PERSSON
m A tRE AOULT Thibntlyed byv i2 i l,, 4

SHOW TIMES:

Fri. 7-9-11,

Sat. 7-9-11; Sun. 6-8-10; Mon. thru Thurs. 7-9

SIH CAESAR o OR I LOK1

NET

*A MM

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