100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 12, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-07-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

'THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1X7V.T)VVQTIAV ITTT.V 19 lOAPY

TWO HE MCHIC1 I Aul'

11 LU LA, JULY 1;,,J1U67

AIGHT-ASHB URY SCENE:
'Hippieville' Exeursion Brings
Arrest For Nurleyev, Fonteyn

SAN FRANCISCO (A) - Dame;
argot Fonteyn and Rudolf Nu-
yev, the world's best-known
llet partners, went on an ex-
irsion to Hippieville early yes-
rday and wound up spending
ve hours in jail.
They, along with 16 others
rested at a noisy party in a
abby flat near Golden Gate
irk, must face Municipal Court
day.
The misdemeanor charges are
sturbing the peace and visiting
place where marijuana was
ed.
Maximum penalty is six months
i each charge, but no one at the
all of Justice seemed to believeF
.at the famous dancers would
dealt with harshly.
V. H. Clark, manager of the
uring British Royal Ballet,I

posted bail of $330 each for the
two dancers at 8 a.m.
During their five hours in cus-
tody they declined all but the
barest comments, and Dame Mar-
got maintained an icy smile be-
hind the shield of her white
ermine wrap. Nureyev, needing a
shave and with his reddish brown
h a i r touseled, clowned and
pranced for photographers and
spectators.
Members of the ballet party
said all began innocently early;
Tuesday as they were dining at
a fashionable restaurant after
Monday night's performance at
the Opera House.
Nureyev and Fonteyn were re-
laxing after a strenuous program
that included "The Dream"
"Monotones," and "P a r a d i s e
Lost."

aarmichael Made Tar get,
)f Anti-Riot Legislation

Someone-no one recalled who
-suggested it might be fun to
visit the Haight-Ashbury district,
habitat of the weirdly dressed,
oddly behaving hippies.
Eight persons piled into two
taxicabs and went to the area.
The time was approaching 3 a.m.
They were attracted by loud
music and sounds of revelry from
the top floor of a shabby three-
story wooden apartment building
at 42 Belvedere St.
Someone leaned out a window
and invited them in.
Kirk Terrill, tenant of the
apartment, later told newsmen
that he and some friends had at-
tended Monday night's ballet, had
visited backstage, and had in-
vited the dancers to drop in later.
They had scarcely gotten set-
tled when two policemen rang the
door bell, someone screamed, "It's
the fuzz! Run! Go out the back
door!"
Noisy Party
Officer Arthur Fobbs said he
and his partner, Officer William
Delaney, were responding to com-
plaints of neighbors about a
noisy party.
Fobbs said their only purpose
was to tell the party to quiet
down, "But when they started
running and scattering,, we had
no choice but to call for- rein-
forcements and round them up."
The officers said they found
seven marijuana cigarettes and a#
pipe in a china cabinet in the
apartment and some other ciga-
rettes spilled on the stairs.
Footsteps
Hearing footsteps above they
found Nureyev lying prone on
the flat roof. On an adjoining
rooftop they found the ballerina,
attempting to hide with three
others.

DAILY OFFICIAL
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sutnday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once onlky.
Student organization notices are not
aecepted for publication. For more
intormation call 764-9270.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 12
Da{y (;(1 Il((
University of Michigan Third Major
Sesquicentennial Conference - "The
University and the Body Politic": Reg-
istration, Michigan Union Lobby, 9 a.m.
to 12 m,
Audio-Visual Education Center Film

neering;tliesis: "The Propagation and
"tructure of Two Ph"e Detonations,"
Thurs . July 13, 1st floor, Conference
Rm., NASA Bldg., N.C., at 10 a.m.
Chairman, J. A. Nicholls.
Doctoral Examination for Hercules
Christ Kazaanas, Education: thesis: "A
Study of the Formal Administrative
Stru-ture of Comprehensive Public
High Schools in Michigan as It Relat-
ed to Vocational and Technical Educa-
tion," Thurs., July 13, Room 4018
UHE, at 12:30 p.m Chairman, R. C.
Wenrichb
Doctoral Examination for Ronald
Carroll Attinger, Music: Performance:
Thurs., July 13, Room 2265 School of
NMu-ic, at 4:30 p.m. Chairman. L. L.
Teatl.
PlaeentI
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
FSEE Applications-For next test. Au-
gust 12. are due Wed,. July 12. Appli-
cations available at Bureau of Appoint-
men ts
Peace Corps Test-Given next Sat.,
July 15. 1 p.m., Downtown Post Of-
fice. Main at Catherine Sts. Appli-
cations at Bureau. complete and take
to test.

4

-Associated Press

WASHINGTON (u'-Negro lead-
1, Stokely Carmichael was called
a free-lance insurrectionist"Tues-
ay by the author of an antiriot
ill that was sped to the House
loor for a vote later this week.
Carmichael was singled out by
ep. William C, Cramer (R-Fla),
s a key target of the legislation,
hich would make it a federal
rime to cross state lines to incite,
rganize or encourage a riot.
The bill was cleared for House
ction by a unanimous voice vote
i the Rules Committee despite
>me doubts expressed about its
onstitutionalty and a noticeable,
ack of administration enthusiasm
or it.
Flaring Riots
Rep. Emanuel Celler (D-NC),[
hlairman of -the Judiciary Com-
ittee, questioned whether the
ieasure would be of any use in
opping the riots now flaring up
a some cities.

BALLET DANCER RUDOLPH NUREYEV appears at Hall of Justice booking desk today to re-
trieve his belongings taken from him when arrested at a San Francisco hippieland party early
yesterday morning. His dancing partner, Dame Margot Fonteyn and a large group of hippies were
arrested. The two dancers were released on bail after being booked for investigation of whether
they should be charged with visiting a place wh ere marijuana was being used, and disturbing the
peace.
ANOTHER CROSSROAD:
Ho Forcing Viet Showdown
Withimpossible',,itResistance
By JOHN T. WHEELER many more troops than the pres- lied military positions since th
Associated Press News Analyst ently authorized 475,000 should be first of the year:

Previnew-Ancyclostoma: Life History
of Hookworms, The Pond and The POSITION OPENINGS:
City,, ani "The Robin": Multipur- Gillette Co. (Toni Co. Division), St.
Pose Room, Undergraduate Library, Paul, Mnn.-Industrial Engineer, 2 yrs.
1:30 pm. exper. project work in any of several
areas. Mechanical Engineer. 2 years in
Dept. of Political Science and Cen- troublenshooting,-with .production
ter for Russian and East European4 equipment, ages 30-35,
Studies: Presents Dr. Jerzy Wiatr, of Matz Corp., Springfield, Mass.-Seek-
the Institute of Philosophy and So- ing interested or trained persons in fil-
ciology, Polish Academy of Sciences,; tration for company doing extensive
speaking on "Political and Social Trans- work in equip. and processes combating
formation in Postwar Poland" at 4:10 air and liquid pollution.
p.m. on Wed., July 12, in the Sixth~ Mobil Chemical Co., Plastics Division,
Floor Conference Room of the Insti- Macedon, N.Y.-Distribution Analyst.
tute for Social Research Bldg, production and inventory control. BS
BA in Industrial Engineering or iProduc-
Dept. of Speech University Players tion Mgmt. plus 4 or more years in
Production - Friedrich Duerrenmatt's this field, some supv. exper.
"The Physicists": Lydia Mendelssohn Big Brothers of Lansing, Lansing.
Theatre, 8 p.m. Mich.-Assistant D'ector, interviews
and screens.- boys and their mothers,
, recruits men for Big Brothers. Gradu-
General Notices ate, with courses in psych., soc., soc,
History Make-up Examinations and work or education.
Language Examinations: Will be held International Packers Limited, Chica-
! Fri., July 14, 4-6 p.m., in Room 429 go, I1.Research and deeopment in
Mason Hall. Please consult your in- meat industry. MA/PhD in Biodhem.,
structor for the make-up examinations Bacteriol., Biol., or Chem. plus 5 years
and then sign the list In the History exper. in indust. food res. Manager-
Office, 3601 Haven Hall. s al ability, research competence in pub-
Fications, patents and industrial
Doctoral Examination for Don Brian achievements.

mass violence. Then he usually
leaves the jurisdiction.
"In his wake are thousands of
Negroes whose blood is simmering,
waiting for the instance certain to
occur in any large city when a
felon is arrested or shot.
"Charges of police brutality ring
out and, like turning up the flame
under a caldron of simmering oil,
the 'boiling point is quickly reach-
ed. The riot is under way."
Cramer called his bill, which has
been attacked by civil rights
groups, a pro-civil rights measure.
"It will get rid of the irrespon-
sible, rabble-rousing hate mongers
and put in business the legitimate,
respected civil rights leaders," he'
said.

"F

;he

i
i

SAIGON (R)--North Vietnam's sent. The impression in Saigon is -North Vietnamese troops have
President Ho Chi Minh has forced that at least 30,000 to 40,000 more set up antiaircraft batteries and a
the United States into a showdown will be authorized. There are 466, major base in the A Shua valley
test of will that U.S. intelligence 000 here now, region, near the Laotian border 30
estimates once rated as impossi- But McNamara and the admin- miles south of the demilitarized
ble. istration must weigh considera- zone. Though B52 jets have work-
In 1965, when it was decided to tions the military men don't have ed over that region repeatedly, the
send about 120,000 American to contend with. enemy buildup has yet to be chal-
troops to rescue South Vietnam To send 100,000 more men prob- ed by allied ground troops.h
from the prospect of defeat, senior ably would mean three divisions
U.S. military officers said it was together with helicopter, supply contrary, U.S. Marines along the

i
T
1'
i
:
$:
:
x

f'
f
3

Terrorist Activity Haltsj
Transport in Hong Kong

"The 50 states all have laws
gainst riots," Celler said, "and
otf a single state or local official
as asked for this law or for fed-
:al intervention in this area."
The cure for riots, he said, lies
t improving living, conditions in
he Negro sectons. .
Vague, Imprecise
Celler said some provisions of
he bill are vague and imprecise
nid raised' questions' of constitu-
onality. He was answered on both
oints by Rep. Richard H. Poff
Poff said the language Celler
bjected to was carefully chosen
meet specific objections raised
y the Justice Department.h
Poff said the chief value of the
11 would be as a deterrent to
iture riots.
"We are not so much interested
i punishing someone for an of-
use already committed as in pre-
mting it from occurring," he
id.
Want Actioni
But Cramer and Rep. James H.
uillen (R-Tenn), a Rules Con-
ittee member, made it clear that
least where Carmichael is con-
ned, they want action against
im.
"I'm getting sick and tired of
e Carmichaels going around this
untry to incite riots," said Quil-
n. "Wherever they go in their
ake lies millions of dollars in de-
ruction of property. Congress
tould take bold steps in enacting
is. legislation."
Cramer said it was more than
incidence that riots have broken
it in cities shortly after visits
y Carmichael.
"He calls for rebellion, recites
.e examples of alleged police
'utality that he says warrant
Phone 434-0130
-nanc on CARPENTER RAD
--NOW SHOWING-

HONG KONG {P)--A govern-
ment curfew halted all Hong
Kong's public transport last night
in the face of terrorist attacks by
Communist-led mobs off Chinese.
They pressed an anti-British cam-
paign with knives, torches and ex-
plosives.
Immobilization-of the buses and
street cars was one aim of the
mobs, which are trying to make a
transport strike 100 per cent ef-+
fective.
Crude bombs were hurled in the
streets, one at riot police trying
to restore order. Armed demon-
strators, some wearing gas masks,
had stopped and set fire to buses
moving in definance of Commu-1
nist orders for the strike.
Smash Stores
A dozen fires burned in Wan-1
chai, a congested Chinese sector
of this 126-year-old British crownI
colony. Mobs smashed store fronts'
and wrecked two restaurants they
accused of hiding Hong Kong de-c
tectives and intelligence officers.!
Police fought back with clubs1
and tear gas, They fired carbine,
and rifle shots over the heads of

The latest outbreaks, begun last
Saturday, have attained a ferocity
unmatched during riots and dem-
onstrations touched off in May
between police and Chinese work-
ers on strike against artificial
flower factories in the Kowloon
Peninsula, the mainland sector of
the colony's 400 square miles.
Failure of those demonstration
to win the support of any number
of Hong Kong's 4 million Chinese
-98 per cent of the population-
was regarded as a setback for the
local Communist leaders.
Peking's interest was reflected
in a rise of propaganda attacks
on the colony. Mao Tse-tung's re-
gime broadcast charges that the
British persecuted Chinese. Though

preposterous to think North Viet-
nam could resist, let alone turn
back, a predicted allied victory
tide.
But by mid 1967 Hanoi's de-j
termination to counter the allied!
offensive, regardless of the cost in
blood and national resources, has
forced Washington to a crossroad
in the seven years long war.
Stalemate
American and Vietnamese mil-
itary sources say that, unless 100,E
000 to 140,000 more U.S. troops are
sent, the allies may be forced
gradually into a defensive posture'
that could end in stalemate.
This could mean the loss of any
hope for a negotiated peace favor-
able to the allied side.
Even if Washington agrees to
all of the recommendations by
Gen. William C. Westmoreland,
the U.S. commander, more troops
might be needed later.
Defense Secretary Robert S. Mc-

and other support units.
'Military men here believe this
would involve a partial mobiliza-
tion ofr reserves, higher draft
quotas, higher battle casualties, an
additional spending, the possibility
of a tax increase and dislocations
in the civilian economy.
Overheated
Concern is voiced also about the
effect of another major buildup
on South Vietnam. Saigon sources
cite the already overheated econ-
omy, government troops who seem
to fight a little less With the ar-
rival of each new U.S. division and
possible effects on the campaign
for winning the allegiance of the
peasants.
The Americans, hailed in 1965
as the saviors of Vietnam, have
lost luster from their public im-
age for a number of reasons. One
is the terrific amount of bombing
and artillery used in the country-
side.

demilitarized zone nave suffered a
nun~ber of defeats. No one has
come up with a method to stop the'
almost daily showers of steel and7
explosives from North Vietnamese
artillery, rockets and mortars
based in and north of the DMZ.
-American casualties have ex-
ceeded original estimates, and this
has forced U.S. commanders toj
send some under strength units
into the field.
S "The United States got caught;
in a whirlpool in Vietnam," a high
U.S. source once said.
ORGAN IZATI ON
NOTI CES
USE OF THIS COLUTMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMINTS is available to otfieily
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1311 SAB.

Chaffin, Industrial ' Engineering, thes-
is: "TheoDevelopment of a Prediction
Model for the Metabolic Energy Ex-
pended During Arm Activities," Wed.,
July 12, Room 214 West Engineering, at
10 a.m, Chairman, W, M. Hancock.
Doctoral Exanmination for John Hugh
McNeill, Pharmacology; thesis: "Drug
fInteractions on Amine Uptake and;
IPhosphorysase Activation," Wed., July,
12, Room 6314 Medical Science. Bldg.,
at 10 a.m. Co-Chairmen, T. M. Brody,
MSU, and M. H. Seevers.
Doctoral Examination for Piergiorgio
Luigi Enrico Uslengh, Physics; thesis:
"Electromagnetic Scattering from Ra-
dially Inhomogeneous Media," Wed.,
July 12, Room 629. Physics-Astronomy
Bldg,, at 3 p.m. Co-Chairmen,, Otto
Laporte and V. H. Weston.
Doctoral Examination for Kenneth
Waterman Ragland, Aerospace Engi-
DIAL 8-6416
ENDI'NG TONIGHT
"Funny & Profound"
-Time Magazine
"CRAZY
QUILT"

For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.

... m"Wo
Admiummomp"m

r dectw nin 7 Lde ecoing
Last 2 Days
Positively Ends Thursday
RODGERS - HAMMERSTEIN'S
WERT WISE

,IANDREWS "cuaTMERPLUMMER
RICHARD HAYDN' w o't
ELEANOR PARKER:
di(ROBERT WISE I RICHARD RODGERS
OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN 111 ERNEST LEHMAN
Matinee 2 PM.-$2.00
Night 8 P.M--.$2.50

i

. . _ ..., - - r_ . i

Red China profits from trade and Namara, who is on his ninth in-
banking ties with Hong Kong, it spection tour of Vietnam, will rec-
voiced demands for the liquida- ommend to President Johnson how
tion- of British rule
U.S. Troops
Objections were revived to use SHOWN
of Hong Kong by U.S. servicemen
on rest and recreation leaves from
the Vietnam war. 1 :00-30-5:00
Considerable blood has been 7:10-9:20
shed since five policemen were

One well informed source cited Deutscher Verein, Will sponsor kaf-
three current situations as symp- feestunde: kaffee, kuchen, konversa-
tiontnWed., July 12, 3-5 p.m., 3050
tomatic of deterioration in the al- Frieze Bldg.
ask

.TATE

"w, ONL[
AEOU LtI
MN ~ If
PANSNTEHIO!E EARTIT

i

NO 2-6264

.7-

l STARTS TOMORROW! I

F

-.3

F

I

WINNER OF 6
ACADEMY AWARDS

A bids forThe MarriedMan
Dy America's mosi Famous swingers
: OR
The Do's And Don'ts For The Married
| Man Who's Thinking Single - or
The Single Man Who's
Just Thinking!
GIRLSI 4
SEE Irrop, «
Vbuco~
1-

; ;,,
;;.::::::: x
: r: ,,,.,z. ..
4

10

VFiUUUU I N Based on the exciting best-seller.
Starmng LEE ERNEST CHARLES JIM JOHN RICHARD
MARVIN BORGNINE BRNSON BROWN CASSAVETEI JAECKEL
GEORGE TRINI RALPH ROBERT TElLY CUINT ROBERT
KENNEDY LOPEZ MEEKER RYAN SAVAIAS WALKER WEBBER
NUNNALY JOHNSON anUKAS HELLER EM NATHANSON KENNETH HYMAN ROBERT A RICH q =
OPENING PREMIERE
TODAY

Mo .ETRO-GU"NMAYER
A CARLO PONi PRODUCTION
DAVID LEAN'S FILM
OF BORIS PAStERNAKS

I

I

I

i

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan