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July 06, 1967 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-07-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JULY 6, 1967

'IIIE MIChIGAN DAILY ThURSDAY, JULY 0.1907

FILMS

,*

'Addio': Inadequate Documentary

By PAUL GINGRAS
Africa's lure for the film maker
is obvious; people enjoy seeingI
colorful exotic places, strange
customs, primitive people, wild
animals at large, and lots of bare,
brown boosums. And, of course all
those extras are free, and Bawana,

ion of character or of "facts." To
neglect style or to mix styles in a
random manner without purpose
is to waste the potential of the
unique tool of the cinema, the
camera, and is something the true
artist would never do.
Mood Missing

people's memories are much longer
than that scene.
A good documentary must be
good journalism. Good journalism
must communicate {a situation ef-
fectively, through full utilization
of all aspects of the medium. The
best is art. This is "Africa Addio'"s
failure.
Without purpose and skill bru-
tality and gore become obscene.
Unfortunately there are people
who like things" the more grotes-
que the better." Almost every cir-
cus has a freak show.

One leaves the theatre after
"Africa Addio" having learned
very little about "the birth of the
i:iw Africa." Of course there is
a beautifully irrelevant scene
showing a man with his arm
plunged into an elephant's rectum
up to the elbow trying to retrieve
a thermometer. It takes him two
tries and several minutes of film.
In short, the viewer of "Africa
Addio" gains about the same
'.nowledge and understanding of
Africa as the reader of the "Na-
tional Inquirer" gets of America.

the benevolent slave holder, gets It is because of its purposeless
plenty of yuks at the black man's and random use of camera styles
expense. that "Africa Addio" fails to cap-
This is the Africa of "Tarzan" ture the mood of Africa and the
and "Ramar of the Jungle," but events of the screen. This is a lack'
the Africa of "Africa Addio'' is an- which ultimately makes the film
other story, or rather, non-story, a failure not only as cinema, but
for "Africa Addio" is a "docu- as journalism. While the scenes
mentary." This raises two ques- of violence and gore at first begin
tions: for the film-maker, how do to create a mood of brutality and
you get people to sit for two hours uncontrolled power, one searches

4

without telling them something re-
sembling a "story,;" and for those
who care, what makes a good
documentary?
Angelo Rizzoli, Jocopetti, Pros-
peri, et al. probably believe they
have developed an answer to the
first question in blood and gore.
As for the second, well-turn a
camera loose and it records what
it sees, impartially, i.e. documents
- that's simple. Also simple-
minded.

for some unity, some current run-
ning through the film, to attach his
emotions to. And one is frustrated
until the mood dies and he be-
comes immune even to the shock
value-just before nausea sets in.
The unity which the camera
fails to provide is not supplied by
the narration. The details of his-t
tory and politics which would
have given meaning to the atroci-
ties which appear are sketchy and
unsatisfactory.

LSD Use in Navy Doubles
According to 2-Year Figure

-Associated Press
MICHIGAN GOV. GEORGE ROMNEY leads his barefoot wife up from a walk on the beach at
Mirror Lake, N.H., where Romney is relaxing and testing the political climate as a possible presi-
dential candidate.
?AIN RELIEVERS MAIN TARGET:
FTC Recommends Regulation
To .Bar Deceptive Advertising

plying an equivalent quantity of
an analgesic ingredient or com-
bination of ingredients."
The commission said the targets
of its proposed rule are:
1. Claims of effectiveness or
safety which contradict or exceed
statements or directions for use!
on labels.
2. False claims of comparative.
strength, speed or duration of
relief.
3. Attributihg beneficial effects
to specified ingredients without
substantiation or without indent-
ifying them by their common orI
usual names.
The commission said one of its
prime duties was to protect the
public from false, misleading, de-
ceptive or unfair advertising, es-
pecially for products that mightI
endanger health or safety.
Deadline Set
It fixed Sept. 15 as the deadline
for the filing of written com-
ments on its proposed rule which
would label advertisments falling
within any of the three target
areas as an unfair method of
competition or an unfair or de-
ceptive act or practice.
The proposed rule says a com-
pany may not advertise its pro-
duct as faster, stronger or longer
lasting unless it can demonstrate
that a significant difference does
exist because of an increased
quantity of analgasic ingredients
in the recommended dosage.
This fact, the proposal says,
must be "clearly and conspicu-
ously" disclosed in the advertise-
ment.
Cigarettes Hit Also
In its campaign for honest ad-
vertising, the FTC also is attack-
ing the cigarette industry.
The FTC says warnings of
health hazards required on ciga-
rette packages are too round-
about, not firm enough, and don't
pack a full enough punch.
The Federal Trade Commission
recommended Friday that warn-j
ings on cigarette packs be
changed to read: "Warning: Cig-
arette smoking is dangerous toj
health and may cause death from
cancer and other diseases."

there was no evidence the warn-
ing required under the 1965 law
has had any significant effect in
cutting public use of tobacco.
In fact the commission noted
that recent estimates indicate
cigarette sales in the past year
will set a record high.
More Listing on Pack
The commission also urged leg-
islation to require that the tarj
and nicotine content of each
brand of cigarettes be listed on
packages and in all advertising.,
And it called an industry trend
toward manufacture of longer
cigarettes disturbing because they
"expose the smoker to greater
amounts of tar and nicotine, mak-
ing them potentially more haz-
ardous than the shorter length
cigarettes."
Ban Long Cigarettes
Commissioner Philip Elman, in
a separate concurring statement,
urged banning of the extra long
cigarettes and of all cigarette
advertising on radio and televi-
sion.
1 The commission statement said
its analysis of television programs
indicated that "intentional or
fortuitous, teen agers appear to
be a prime target for televised
cigarette advertising."
The commission's recommenda-
tions to Congress were made
within hours after the cigarette
industry protested a recent Fed-
eral Communications Commission
ruling that radio and television
stations which carry cigarette ad-
vertising may be required to fur-
nish free time to anti-cigarette
advocators.
The June 2 ruling, said an in-
dustry petition, exceeded the
FCC's authority.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1311 SAB.
* * *

Resources Limited What the viewer is confronted
The resources open to the maker with is an endless parade of scenesI
of pure documentary film are lim- showing a man, with his abdomen2
ited. He must, in general, do with- cut open by torturers, writhing on
out character and plot and con- the ground holding his intestines!1
fine himself to utilization of the in, close-ups of magot infestedt
camera, the narration, and music. carcases; and recently severed'
The camera is the most impor- hands dripping blood; and on and
tant tool of film-making. And the on. .
cameraman and director must Misfit Music
select those elements from the The music, which should, in its
total visual environment upon proper role, also aid in capturing{
which they will direct the "gaze" the mood and be an integral part
of the camera, just as we uncon- of the totality, sounds as if it
sciously aim our natural vision at were taken from an unsuccessful
those elements of our every day L.P. which can now be re-released,
visual environment which we de- as "The Sound Track from Africa3
sire, or are otherwise motivated, Addio" in hopes of better sales.
to perceive. There are some good shots and
The individual's choice of what skillfully done scenes, such as the
he perceives and the manner in fox hunt which shows a nativej
which he perceives it is largely a boy dragging a shipped-in . fox
function of his personality. The body in lieu of the real animal,j
director uses the camera to and a scene in which native actors
achieve what in literature is term- in South Africa play music. The
ed "persona" or "mask." That is, first sunset is beautiful and
as one watches a film, his per- moving but the director realizes
ceptions of what takes place in the he had a good thing and the third'
world created on the screen are sunset is two too many. Near the
not those dictated by his own per- end comes a scene showing girls
sonality, but, are rather, those in South Africa stripping to bath-
dictated by the "personality" ing suits and swinging in slow mo-
which the director has chosen to tion, a clever effect but entirely
give to the camera as a sort of impertinent.
"narrator." Finally, at the end of the film
To be effective, the director, there is a scene which utilizes the'
even of documentary, must choose media; one in which the viewer
the style of cinematography which is led to believe that he is in a'
will contribute to the totality of church when actually he is in a
his presentation, be it a presenta- gold vault. Unfortunately most
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

WASHINGTON ()-Navy fig-
ures show drug usage among sail-
ors has climbed at a rate more
than double that of last year. The
hallucinatory drug LSD has been
involved in 28 cases resulting in
administrative discharges since
February.
The figures, as well as a new
anti-LSD directive issued last
month, seem to indicate more and
more Navy men are taking psy-
chedelic trips on LSD-trips that
in most cases carry them right
out of the Navy.
In response to questions, the
Navy said yesterday that in the
first five months of this year, 187
Navy men had been given admin-
istrative-nonpunitive but not
honorable-discharges for wrong-
ful possession or use of drugs.
This compares with 176 similar
cases in all of 1966.
Apparently the Navy began keep-
ing track of LSD cases only this
year. No figures were available
a L
presents
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
FOREIGN
Correspondent
SEE! international
intrigue
SEE! NAZI plots
exposed
FEEL! the Unbearable
suspense
:RIDAY AND SATURDAI
7:00 and 9:05 P.M.
Architecture Auditorium
-STILL ONLY 50c

for 1966, but the Navy said rec-
ords beginning in February indi-
cated that 28 of the 187 admin-
istrative discharges given this year
involved some use or mention of
LSD.
According to the figures, drug
usage among Navy ranks has risen
at a monthly rate more than 21/
times that of 1966.
The Navy was unable to say
how many had been court martial-
ed on drug charges this year. Last
year there were 13 courts martial
involving drugs-not specified in
available records as to type-with
12 resulting in bad conduct dis-
charges.
The new regulation, one ad-
miral said, illustrates the Navy's
concern that experimentation with
the so-called consciousness ex-
panding drug might spread from
college campuses through Navy
ROTC units into the regular serv-
ice.
- -~ -- -
er/ ctta o 3In pde n Gcxin~
DIAL 5-6290
RODGERS- HAMMERSTEINS
ROBERTWSEI
" WINNER if
SACDMldt d RS
Ju~tANDREWS-CHorSHEaPLUMMER
RICHARD HAYDN
ELEANOR PARKERz
I ROBERT WISE I RICHARD RODURS
OSCAR IIAMMERSTEIN 111 ERNEST LEHMAN
Mon. thru Fri. 2 P.M.-$2.00
Sot, I :00-4:30--$2.00
Sun. 1 :00-4:30-$2.50
All Nights 8 P.M.-$2.50
Children All Times-$1.00

0

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Miculgan for which The
Michigan Dally assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Noti'es should be
sent in TVP'EWKI'T1EN form to
Room 3566 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2~ p.m. of the day prereding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Sat.arday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a mai-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organiration notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information ca1 14-VC7O.
THURSDAY, JULY 6
Day Calendar
Audio-Visual Education Center Film
Preview-"History of the Negro in
America": Multipurpose Room, Under-
graduate Library, 1:30 p.m.
International Center Tea-603 East
Madison, 4:30 p.m.
Linguistic Institute Forum Lecture-
Prof. William Labov,Columbia Univer-
sity, "The Significance of Marginal
Phonemes": Rackham Lecture Hall, 7:30
p.m.
University Musical Society Fair Lane
Festival-Caramoor Festival Opera Pro-
ductions-Julius Rudel, music director-

organist, present Benjamin Britten's
"The Burning Fiery Furnace": Dear-
born Campus, the University of Michi-
gan, 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
Final Payment of Summer Half Term
Fees and Spring Summer Full Term
Fees: Are due and payable on or be-
fore July 7, 1967.
(Continued on Page 5

1i,

i

BREAKING WE

.1

-I

t

SEMI GAMER!

Under a law passed in 1965, the Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk dance.
packages now carry these words: rith instruction open to everyone,
"Caution: Cigarette smoking Thurs. July 6, 8-11 p.m., Barbour Gym.
may be hazarous to your health." Christian Science Organization, Week-
In urging Congress to modify ly testimony meeting, July 6, 7:30 to
the wording, the commission said 8:30 p.m., 3545 SAB.

POLICY
Monday thru
Friday
Shows at 7
& 9P.M.

"A HORROR PICTURE WITH AN EXTRAORDINARILY
DELICATE AND SENSUOUS QUALITY!
A THRILLER! EXQUISITE! MYSTICAL!
SPECTACULAR! EXCITES THE SENSES .. .
CINEMATIC ARTISTRY!"
-Bosley Crowther, N.Y. Times

GALA GRAND
Premiere Opening
Fox Village Theatre
WEDNESDAY- JULY 12
Ann Arbor's Newest Most Modern Theatre
Featuring:
F AMERICAN BODIFORM SEATS
FINEST PRODUCTIONS
* STEREOPHONIC SOUND
LUXURIOUS CARPETING
f THERMOSTAT-CONTROLLED
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See in persoallollywood & IV personality
CHILL WILLS
Also a Great Movie! NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN THEATRES E
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AN FtEM I NOG'S tU O NLYLE
3. ad -IIEi! oivwa olive!

I'

-Judith Crist, N.Y. Herald Tribune

Il

Nw,

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