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May 06, 1967 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-05-06

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THE 311CHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY. MAY d, 1967

. .....IC HI...AN...AI.LY..F.-........MAY..............

a. .sws vas.r. a-XA y, 0, 1JV

0

CATORS CLASH:

tate Board Considers Drop
1 Teacher Code Standards

kNSING -- A clash between
hers and administrators of
ch i g a n schools developed
nesday over higher educa-
al standards for the granting
eaching certificates and spe-
p e rm i t s for substitute
hers.
rguments were raised at a
ing before the State Board of
cation on a proposed new
her certification code. The
ing was attended by nearly
educators representing teach-
groups and administrators.
hie proposed change in the
ification code would require
those receiving a teachers
ificate have at least 15 hours
nstruction beyond their bache-
degree. The present code
ch was adopted in 1939 calls
at least 10 hours of instruc-
. The teachers groups are ask-
for a limit of 30 hours.
second area of contention
e over retention by the pro-
d code of 90 day and full year
hing permits which allow un-
ified teachers to fill-vacancies
classrooms if superintendents
not fill the vacancies in any
r way-
hool administrators claim that
i the temporary teaching per-
s and the reduced educational
airements are needed because
a severe teacher shortage in
higan. Dr. Robert LeAnderson,
erintendent of personnel for
roit public schools, said at the
ring that "we were about 300
hers short when we started
ool last fall. If this provision
ropped it will mean that next
tember we are practically go-
out of business."

Representatives of the Mich-
igan Education Association and
its rival organization, the AFL-
CIO affiliated Michigan Federa-
tion of Teachers claimed that the
permits allowed back door entry
into teaching by unqualified peo-
ple and urged that they be abol-
ished as soon as possible. They
proposed higher pay and better
contracts for luring people into
teaching.
Dean William Haber, chairman
of the University's Committee on
Teacher Education said that he
approved in general the Board's

proposed plan, but he did advocate
the requirement of 30 hours of
instruction beyond a bachelors
degree for a permanent teaching
certificate.
The three members of the Board
of Education who were present at
the hearing said that the proposed
revisions were the best that they
could do in the face of legal re-
strictions and the chronic teacher
shortage. The Board will vote on
possible further changes and pos-
sibly on the plan as a whole next
week. If the plan is adopted it
will take two or three years for it
to be put into effect.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
official publication of the Univer- the U. of M. is sufficient to register chem., biol., or related subjects. Lo-
sity of Michigan for which The with the Bureau of Appointments. Come cations nationwide.
Michigan daily assumes no editor- in and brows- through numerous direc- United Community Chest of Ingham
ial responsibility. Notices should be tories, current openings, company and City, Inc., Lansing, Mich.-Public re-
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to government literature. Hours: 8:30-12 lations director, dir, of year-round
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be- and 1:30-4:30 Monday-Friday, 3200 SAB. campaign relations activities. Min. 2
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding yrs. exper. work with media, writing
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday POSITIO'N OPENINGS: releases an 1 publications.
for atarday and Sunday. General Schonberg and Schonberg, CPA, Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc., Chi-
Notices may be published a maxi- Southfield, Mich.-Jr. Accountant, di- cago, IlI.-Editorial Summer Project
mum of two times on request; Day versified practice, young man, B grades '67, Srs. and grads in all fields, firm
Calendar items appear once only. or better, personable and ambitious, grasp of subject area, fast reader, sound
Student organization notices are not Houston Community Center, Philadel- judgment, full or part time. Also per-
accepted for publication. For more phia, Pa.-Program Director, group to manent positions: Reference writer.
information call 764-9270. motivate 13-15 yr. olds. MSW and some generalist with adv. degrees and edi-
exper. in group work. Start June or torial exper. Geography researcher, BA/
FRIDAY, MAY 5 Sept. BS Geog., Econ., Poll. Sci., or other re-
Marshall Associates, Enicino, Calif- lated fields, functional foreign lang.,
Research Scientist, PhD desired, em- adding machine and calculator. Library
y Calendar phasis on physics of metallurgy. Broad Research Asst., Lib. arts degree with
theoretical trng., exper. in experimenta- course work n i sciences. Production
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem- tion, familiar with library research. Assistant, Lib. arts bkgd., infinite pa-
inar-"The Management of Managers": Department of Army-June 12 start- tience.
146 Business Administration, 8:15 a.m,- ing, intensive 6 mos. program for grad- National Retirement Insurance Co.,
5 p.m., and 7-9 p.m. uates. Computer Sciences areas, at Pur- Dearborn, Mich.-Mktg. career, trng. to
due in Indianapolis, Ind. become Jr. Exec., 1 yr. trng..program.
General otices «'W. R. Grace & Co., N.Y.C.-2 open- House of the Good Shepherd, Chi-
ings. Tax analyst, planning work, ex- cago, Ill.-Director of Physical Educa-
French and German Preliminary Ob- pertise in acctg., MBA or LLB or both. tion, grad with major or minor in
jective Test: Administered by Graduate Assistant Manager of Mgmt. Reports Phys. Ed., young man 24 yrs. or older.
School for doctoral candidates, Rackham Section, supv, 14 people in div. of Also expansion program requires re-
Lecture Hall, Thurs., May 25, 7 to 9 financial report for top mgmt. Degree cruitment In Social Services, Educa-
p.m. All students planning to take the in acctg. and exposure to finance and Lion, Clinical Services and Recreation.
test must register at Reception Desk about 10 yrs. diversified acctg. bkgd. Sherwin-Williams Co., Chicago, Ill.-
of Graduate School Office, Rackham with manufacturing company, Technical Editor, in colors and chemi-
Bldg. by 4 p.m., May 25. For further Rex Chainbelt, Inc., Milwaulee, Wis. cats dept. Chem. or ChE with writing
information call: Reception Desk, Of- -Management trng. program 52 weeks, ability or Engl./Journ. degree with in-
fice of the Graduate School, 764-2199, need technical and non-tech. degrees. terest in chemical industry.
any engrg. and bus. in any field or # * *
Student Government Council Approval econ., anktg., or math. To acquaint For further information please call
of the following student sponsored trainees with challenges of career lead- 764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
events becomes effective 24 hours after ing to responsibilities in mgmt. of Appointments, 3200 SAB
the publication of this notice. All pub- company.
licity for these events must be with- U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, Div. Con- SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
held until the approval has become ef- sumer & Mkt. Service, Chicago, Ill. - 212 SAB-
feetive. 75 openings for Processed Products Summer Placement Service Hours -
Approval request forms for student Graders (GS-5), start before June 30. 1 to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday, 212 SAB,
sponsored events are available in Room Graduates in agriculture, food tech, lower level
1011 of the SAD.
U. of M. Sailing Club, Open meet- * w ,w
mig May 4. 7:30-11 p.m.. Ballroom

Choice
Of The

First

*

Mansfield Urges Troop
Reductions in Europe

R E G I S T E R E D
D I A M O N D R I N G S r

I

WASHINGTON (I) - Senate
Democratic Leader Mike Mans-
field recently urged a "phase by
phase reduction" of U-S. troops in
Europe, and said a planned 35,000
man cutback is a good start in
that direction.
The chief Senate advocate of
a substantial reduction in U.S.
troop commitments in Europe al-
so indicated he will seek to keep
the pressure on for continuing
withdrawals.
But Mansfield said in an inter-
view he is not seeking abrupt,
swift reductions,
"I realize that these things can't
be done overnight," he said.
Secretary of State Dean Rusk
discussed the troop issue yester-
day at a closed session of a spe-

s
l
1
1

cial Senate panel headed by
Mansfield.
It is considering a series of
resolutions on the topic - chief
among them, a measure sponsored
by Mansfield and 43 other Sena-
tors - that would have the Sen-
ate declare itself in favor of sub-
stantial U.S. troop reductions in
Europe.
"We don't intend to end the'
hearings in a hurry," Mansfield
said "We're not going to rush
out with any findings."

They like the smart styling and
the guaranteed perfect center
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cut. The name, Keepsake,
in your ring assures lifetime
satisfaction. Select yours at
our Keepsake Jeweler's store.
He s in the yellow pages under
'Jewelers.

MichiganUnion.VV
University Activities Center, A mixer
on the Diag, May 6, 9-12 p.m., Diag.
Delta Phi Epsilon Sorority and Phi'
Epsilon Pi Fraternity, Lawn dance, Aug.
29, 8:30-11:30 p.m., Phi Epsilon Pi
House awn.
Tau DeltaaPhi Fraternity,- All cam-
pus lawn dance, Aug. 30, 2-5 p.m.,
2015 washtenaw
---~-----

3A Revises Regulations
ri Fair Trial, Free Press

The hearings will continue to
focus attention on the topic and
on the Mansfield resolution, whichI
the Johnson administration op-
poses.
The United States announcedj
Tuesday a plan to withdraw up
to 35,000 Army and Air Force per-
sonnel, plus their dependents,I
from West Germany.
Great Britain and West Germ-
any endorsed the move as part of
an effort to cut the cost of Euro-
pean defense.
Administration officials esti-
mated the manpower transfer
would mean savings of about $100
million a year in foreign exchange
expenditures.j

Placemer C
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Students and Alumni-12 hours with
ORGANIZATION
NOT ICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only, Forms are available in
Room 1011 SAB.
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk dance
with instruction open to everyone, Fri.,
I May 5, 8-11 p.m., Barbour Gym.

I

tGEORGE WEIN Presents the 14th annual
NEIWPOR T 3A\Lz FE STIVAL :
JUNE 30 thru JULY 3, 1967
at Festival Field " Newport, Rhode Island
Count Basie, Dave Brubeck, Charlie Byrd, John Coltrane, Miles Davis,
" Dizzy Gillespie, Woody Herman, Earl Hines, Herbie Mann, Modern -
Jazz Quartet, Thelonious Monk, Wes Montgomery, Olatunji,
Preservation Hall Band, The Blues Project, Buddy Rich Band,tMax
Roach, Sonny Rollins, Nina Simone, Willie "The Lion" Smith, Joe :
Williams, Sarah Vaughan, and many others.
Four Evening Concerts - Friday thru Monday -
Afternoon events: Saturday, Sunday, Monday
Opening Night Friday - "Schlitz Salute to Jazz"
Tickets: $2.50, 3.50, 4.50
Other Evenings: $3.50, 4.50, 5 50 (All Box Seats: $10.00)
Afternoon General Admission: $3.00
. THE NEWPORT FOLK FOUNDATION Presents the
NEWPORT FOL FESTiVAL
JULY 10 thru JULY 16
Four major evening concerts Thursday through Sunday, Children's Day
- Wednesday, Craft demonstrations, daily Workshops; Monday and.
- Tuesday devoted to American and International Folk Dance; Tuesday
evening, folk tales, anecdotes, story telling and instrumental music.
Evening Tickets: Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun.: $3.50, 4.50, 5.50
(Box Seats $10.00)
-, Mon., Tues. Eves. & Afternoon Events: $2.00 General Admission
- Group Rates Available
"All Programs Subject to Change
For information and tickets regarding all Newport Festivals
Write . . . Newport Festivals, Newport, Rhode Island 02840

t

PRICES FROM 1100, TO SSOOO. PINGS ENLARGED TO SHOW BEAUTY OF
DETAIL. OTRADEMARK RES, A. M. POND COMPANY, INC., ESTABLISHED 1892.

HICAGO UP) - The American
Association recently announ-
amendments to its original
trial and free press recom-
idations.
he principal revisions would
ralize the association's original
estion that attorneys restrict
.r public statements during the
rse of a trial and allow police
artments "reasonable time" to
pt rules on the release of crime
's.
he amendments were approved
the association's 10-member
isory committee on fair trial
free press, headed by Paul C
rdon of Boston, a member of
Supreme Judicial -Court of
ssachusetts.
The basic approach-that of
ing the bar and the law en-
-ment branch to put their own
tes in order and of enhancing,
judicial remediesaavailable
n the right to fair trial is
eatened-has been retained,"
LIBRARIAN TRAINEES
LIBRARY TECKICIANS
Openings at
he Chicago Public Library
r graduating students from all
aids of specialization.
BRARIAN TRAINEE POSITIONS
ovide for work-study program
which Trainee completes re;-
irements for Master's degree in
>rary Science while acquiring
octical library experience.
LIBRARY TECHNICIAN
POSITIONS
ovide an opportunity to assist
ofessional librarians in an inter-
ting variety of library science,
thout further educational re-
irements.
INDIVIDUAL PREFERENCE
CONSIDERED IN MAKING
ASSIGNMENTS.
EXCELLENT STAFF BENEFITS,
r Information Please Contact:
Mrs. Charlotte Shabino
Personnel Office
The Chicago Public Library
78 East Washington Street
Chicago, Illinois 60602

the committee said in a statement.
On statements by attorneys
during a trial the committee said
it narrowed and clarified the spe-
cific restrictions so that they ap-
ply only pending the imposition
of sentence in the trial court and
not while the case is pending "in
any court."
Another amendment said the
bar association should narrow the
proposals advanced on use of
contempt power. "There are cer-
tain instances when the use of
that power is appropriate and
fully consistent with the consti-
tution," the committee said.
What Every
Young Working Girl
Should Know
...about the fun and games, the
toll and trouble of living and
working in a metropolis. ,
McCall's Editor Lynda Bird Johnson
k got the candid story, through
personal interviews with aware
young girls in big cities from
coast to coast..
Read this handy guide on how to
confound competition and pick
the plum job... beat the
apartment scramble and the
re pulsive-roomrmate risk ... turn
on a lagging social life,
turn off an aggressive male.
Don't miss "The Working Girl,
1967 Style." In May McCall's.
AT ALL NEWSSTANDS NOW.

HOW TO PLAN YOUR ENGAGEMENT AND WEDDING I
Please send new 20-page booklet, "How To Plan Your Engage-
ment and Wedding" and new 12-page full color folder, both for
only 25c. Also, send special offer of beautiful 44-page Bride's Book.

3rd ANNUAL
JUDO DEMONSTRATION
Saturday, May 6, 1967-8-9 P.M.

Name..
I Address
Cit y
State ___

Zip

1

I

KEEPSAKE D AMOND RINGS, BOX 90, SYRACUSE, N. 13202
dea an Ue aiyClssfid d

3r

Tickets at YM \C.A

Donation: Adults $ 00

Children under 12 accompanied by parents free

Does growing
up have to be absurd?
Can you learn
about McLuhan 0 .
through Aristotle?
What kind of political life
is plausible in Vietnam?

SUmmervdcdtionitis.
,(How to spot and get rid of),

SUY IT-OR ORDER BY SUBSCRIPTION-.
AT YOUR LOCAL COLLEGE BOOKSTORE

What happens in a "happening"?
. For the undergraduate who is unwilling to settle for easy
answers, who seeks relevance in his studies-there is now
a place.
" There is a small college within a noted university in New
York City. It has no "credit system" for measuring
knowledge; no large lecture halls for one-way dialogues;
no teaching assistants where the professor should be.
* What it does have is a new program of study conceived
for students who can best realize their intellectual poten-
tial by learning how to inquire, by seeking meaningful
relationships between disciplines, by recognizing alterna-
tive modes of analysis and explanation. It has a faculty
that is discussion-oriented, concerned with teaching -
and learning - only through active participation of the
student. It has a philosophy which views preparation for
graduate school as just one of several possible goals of
a liberal arts education.
* THE NEW SCHOOL COLLEGE offers a two-year course of
study (the third and fourth years of undergraduate work)
leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree in the Humanities
or the Social Sciences. It provides opportunities for spe-
cialized study and research through a tutorial program
conducted within a broad liberal arts framework. It
grants degrees only on the basis of comprehensive exam-
inations administered after completion of the course of,
study. It is open only to students who have completed
at least two years of college work at other accredited
institutions.
For further information, please contact the Director of
Admissions, The New School College, Room 200, New
School for Social Research, 66 West 12th Street, New
York, N. Y. 10011, OR 5-2700.
THE
NEW SCHOOL
COLLEGE

Pallid peepers'
There's no sparkle in those baby-blue
eyes. It's been knocked out by all those
Fluorescent fade-out. rexams. Get that vitality back. See what
"*'"ro" eg cgood is still left in the world. Go to
That's from being cooped-up al l winter. Expo 67, Montreal
What you need for that sallow pallor
is some sunshine Vitamin D. There's a
whole lot of it available at Sunset
Beach in Acapulco,
f*
Lip lingo.
They're letters from good buddies
away for the summer. The best
way to avoid them is not to be
there when they arrive. Be in
Puerto Rico instead.
The good books.-Racquet squad.
They have the possibility of being That's the tennis team in your
good symptoms. That's if you neighborhood during the summer
seek summer scholastics. Say i You'd find snorkeling or scuba diving
Mexico City. Or Acapulco, in the Bahamas would make playing
tennis seem like last summer's
bad sports
College fatigues.
That's the uniform you wore all semester, B.T Down.
Get rid of those o.d.'s (olive drabs). That's all you've known summer
Break out the white levis. And throw orLn after summer. A change of palate
a colorful Mexican serape.,,, would do you good. In Bermuda a
few savory morsels of Hopping John
with a sauce of Paw-Paw MontespaoI
usually does the trick

1

'ree to
ichigan
students
Z50 to others

CROSSROADS OF THE
WORLD FOR 30 MILLION
YOUNG PEOPLE
"Under
r. the
v. '!Err r Revolving
r Triangle"
Facilities for 2,000
Young Men, Women and
Families

tew booklet, published by a
-profit educational founda-
1, tells which career field lets
make the best use of all
r college training. including

t

u

r

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