100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 27, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-06-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO tlE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 1967

Bloc States Attain Diplomacy

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

By WILLIAM L. RYAN
Associated Press News Analyst
In their two days of meetings
at Glassbo'o, leaders of the United
States and the Soviet Union came
as close to statemanship as Rus-
sians and Americans had for a,
long time, even though their sum-
mit failed to make discernible
progress on major explosive issues.
Glassboro was just a small be-
ginning, but the fact remains that
it happened. In that alone, Glass-
boro becomes a sort of beacon,
Even the damp blanket spread
by Alexei N. Kosygin once he left.
New Jersey failed to smother the
glimmer of hope which the face-
to-face meeting produced - the
hope, as President Johnson put it,
that the world now is a little less
dangerous:
Now Kosygin has some fences
to mend. A Soviet leader had come
close, perhaps too close,' to looking
human. Russian leaders, trapped
by their own cliches, now must
try to allay suspicions which have
arisen among those who already
were distrusteful allies.
Thus, the first stop onz Nosy-
gin's long journey home is Com-
munist Cuba, . whose "maximum
leader,'' Fidel Castro, must take
a dim view of any Soviet deputy
exchanging handshakes with the
leader of "the imperialists,"
Nobody had expected a radical
change from the meeting. Any
deep-going change in U.S.-Soviet
relations would take time and pa-
tience. But there was, indeed, a
change in the fact that the Pre-
mier and the President met at all,
and that both, for the time being,
put aside domestic and foreign
considerations which could make

S
1
A
3
t
,
1

such a meeting politically risky. selves, with the rest of the nations the UN Assembly by Comrade
Soviet-American summits tend as spectators. Alexei Nikolayevich Kosygin has
to refocus attention on something Once back from Glassboro, expressed the position of our party
which often is forgotten. rhat is Kosygin stopped smiling. He re- and government," Pravda, the
that there are two enormously treated to the rigid, prefabricated Communist party paper said.
powerful nations in this world. positions of Moscow policy on all The position had been maped
The United Nations has been a major issues. out in advance. Kosygin was just
safety valve, a forum for debate. What he said at his news con- a messenger of the collective, the
But major decisions affecting the ference at the United Nations was representative of the whole Soviet
future of the world and the future practically a rerun of his speech leadership.
of peace cannot be made without a week ago in the UN debate on By the same token, however,
American-Soviet collaboration. the Middle East crisis. Kosygin could not have attended
U.S.-Soviet summits in the past Before he even arrived in Glass- the summit without that collective
have shaped the destiny of the boro, a Pravda edtiorial made it leadership's approval.
rest of the world, or made the clear the Soviet premier was in Now the Chinese Communists
difference between extreme ten- no position to depart in any sig- will point scornfully again at
sion and relative tranquility. nificant respect from prescribed Moscow and cry, "We told you so."
Whatever was accomplished was lines. Cuban Communists will be sus-
done by the two big powers them- "The speech at the session of ! picious. Algerians and Syrians,

the farthest left and most loudly
"anti-imperialist" of the Arab
bloc, will entertain doubts of '
long-range Soviet intentions.
Kosygin hardly made the Arabs
happy, for example, by conceding,
that Israel had a right to exist. -
China will accuse the Russians of
under-the-table deals looking to-
ward a future Vietnam settlement.
But whatever Kosygin and the
Soviet collective do now, they can-
not turn back history's pages.:
There may be repercussions in
Moscow and perhaps even a new
clash at the top, but Glassboro
will stay in the'history books, con-
tinue to represent a timid step on
a long road.a

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
otriciai putbliration of the Univer-
sity of Micnigan for which T'he
Michigan 1 atiy assumes no editor-
ial responsib ly. Notices should be
sent in TYIWK lT''N forth to
Room 3564 Administratton Bldg. be-
fore 1 p.m. of the day prereding
pubitcation and by 8 p.m. Friday
for Satarda) aud Sunday. Generasi
Notices may be publshed a maxi-
mum of two times on request; 1/ay
Calendar items appear once only.
Studentrorganization nntices are not
accepted for pubitciattnn. Yor more
inrormation call 74-tl7O.
TUESDAY, JUNE 27
Day caxlenda~cr.
Bureau of industrial Relations Sem-
inar---"Improving Management Skills":
Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m.
College of Pharmacy Conference -
"Annual Meeting of American Society
of Pharmacognosy": Rackham Bldg.,
9:30 a.m,
Audio-Visual Education Center Film
Preview-"Search for Ulysses": Multi-
purpose Room, Undergraduate Library,
1 :30 p.m.
Linguistic Institute Forum Lecture -
Opening of Institute : Rac~kham Lecture
Hall, 7:30 p.m.,
Women's Jrife Guard Corps Meeting -
Tuesday, June 27, 7:30 p.m. in the
Mtargaret Bell Pool Lobby. All women
with WSI's are welcome to attend.
College of Pharmacy Seminar -
"Teachers' Seminar on Pharmacognosy
1967": Rackham Bldg., 8 p.m.

Plaxc~reen

Cooperative Educational Service Agen-
cy No. 8, Appleton. Wis.-Two Speech

._ e:....._._. _ ____ _ __ __

'CHARGE POLICE BRUTALITY:
Student Death May

POSiTiON OPENINGS: therapists. Public Health Nurse, $$ de-
grEe plus certification. 10 mos. terms of
LCamp Fire Gxirls, lnc.--Opeinigs at duity.
Detroit and Battle Creek. Mich.--ExeC-
utiv-e Directors, women.25 or ov er, BA C'ity of Saginaw, Mich.-Recreation
degrees require 3-5 yrs exper. in oCF.G. Supervisor III, Center Director in win-
teaching, business with supv. respon. ter, summer may supv. large play area.
MA degrees require 5-7 yrs. for more Graduate with any major, adequate
advanced position in larger communi- yphsical and moral qualifications.
ties. University of Wisconsin Medical Cen-
Flint Osteopathic Hospital, Flint, ter, Madison, Wis.-Large variety of de-
Mich.-Administrator, 250 bed hospital, partments need BS degrees in Chem.,
some exper, in similar capacity. i Bio-Chem, Biol.. Med. Tech., Path-
Ideal Induxstries, Inc., Sycamore, Iil. ology- and Bacteriol. MS degree in
-Openings in Detroit. Cleveland, In- Psych. for Psych.-Phystol.
dianapolis, and Milwaukee. Sales Engi- * * *
neer, O.E.M. and Distributor Markets.
Degree and related exper. with electri- For furt'her lIiformlation please call
cal, electronic and automotive Indus- 764-7460, eneral Divisioni, Bureau of
tries. Appointments, 3200 SAB.
UNIVERtSITY PLAYER S
,.
TOMORROW NIGHT
with

Precipitate

4,
4

Demonstrations in West Germany

By HUBERT J. ERB
Associated Press News Analyst
In this era of wars, the death
of one man can go unnoticed.
But the death of a West German
student from a West Berlin po-
liceman's bullet has brought to
the surface boiling discontent
among students across the coun-

wild West Berlin demonstration
against the Shah of Iran are but
one indication that for the first
time since World War II a na-
tional German student movement
is in the making.
Exactly what happened when
Ohnesorg was killed may never
be made clear.

filled eggs, vegetables, sand and and lowered the American flag to

try. It is enough for the students
Solidarity marches from Bonn that a police bullet killed him
to Berlin in sympathy for the during what they allege to have
death of Benno Ohnesorg, 26, of been brutal police action against
Hannover in the aftermath of a demonstrators who threw paint-

stones. A score of policemen were
injured as well as about 24 dem-
onstrators.
According to their own state-
ments, the students now are pro-
testing what they consider an
overly authoritarian German so-
ciety, which they say they were
told would be more democratic.
German universities, however,
traditionally h a v e been very
straightlaced and this as much as
anything else appears to be what
the students want to break away
from.
Add to this the division of Ger-
many, the unnatural position of
Berlin, the legacy of guilt from
Nazi times, concentration by gov-
ernment and the mass of the pop-
ulation on "wohlstand" - pros-
perity - and what bothers the
students becomes a little clearer.
On the government side, there
is some resentment that the stu-
dents use state funds to study
and then criticize their bene-
factors. But there also is latent
sympathy for Their dissatisfaction
with the status quo.
"I too," said a member of the
German federal parliament. "am
disappointed when I look back
over the last two decades of Ger-
man progress. We are no nearer
a solution to the division of our
country than we ever were."
Here a long history of class
differences that transcend current
developments is visible. University
students always have felt them-
selves to be something special in
Germany, where most workers
leave school at 14 even today.
For a worker, faced with his
own problems, the disruption of
law and order through demonstra-
t ions by the more fortunate stu-
dents is difficult to understand.
Concerning West Berlin speci-
fically, the battle lines were hard-
ened on Feb. 5, 1966, when a
group of anti-Vietnam war dem-
onstrators spilled over to the U.S.

i
ti
.I
;
;f
.
r.

half staff.
In a followup sidewalk sit-in,
police use of rubber clubs and the
students retaliation escalated the

level of hostility.N i
On the eve of Vice President General No' lees
Hubert H. Humphrey's visit in Doctoral Examination for John Wil-
Ap Liam Koch, Physics; thesis: "Interac-
Apri, police arrested 10 sd artions of Cosmic Ray Nuclear Active
members of what the students Particles in Iron at Mountain Altitude,"'
call "the horror commune" for Tues., June 27, Room 629 Physics-As-
traonomy Bldg., at 2:30 pm. Chairman,
planning to throw such things as, w. E. Hazen.
pudding at him.
When the 10 were released even Doctoral Examination for Jan Emily
Farrell, Education; thesis: "An Appli-
before Humphrey left the city, cation of Programmed Instruction to
student self-righteousness found the Perceptual-Motor Skill of Tennis,"
itself well-served and the stage wed., June 28, West council Room,
was set far much bolderaction Rackha Graduate School, at 1 p.m.
wsstfrmc bodrChairman, S. A. Howard.
during the Shah's visit this
month. Doctoral Examination for Hirokuni
Tamura, Business Administration; thes-
That the students of West Ber- is: "Linear Models for Macroeconomic
lin have struck a responsive note Policy Making," Wed., June 28, Room
in their protests among other stu- 816 Business Administration, at 3:30
dents is seen from supporting
statements of student leaders e,:Se-
where. One national rallying point ForeV t0 "

pr
\.
/
Y j
a
//l r '
i
' I ; !.
; _
;
/ ,
1 'I , .
t a . ,
i

ki

f

' is a=hat the students call ina. l -

C.

1
7
4
" +
1
4
. 1 r
' r
' 1
'
((V
U

~~ "-~ """^ " " "" The following foreign visitors can be
quate facilities and not enough reached through the Foreign Visitor
schools. Programs Office. 764-2148.
Dr. Ambalal S. Patel, Center for Ad-
How far aly joint student ac- vanced Study in Education, University
tion program Will go or what form of Baroda, India, June 24-July 2.
it will take is still not evident de- Janos Barat (accompanied by Mrs.
Barat), research worker, Research In-
spite the students' avowed pur- stitute for Automation, Hungary Acad-
pose of becoming a political force. emy of Sciences, Hungary, June .25-29.
Miss Afaf Deeb Kandis, research as-
More certain is that the general sistant, UsIS Regional Research Office,
population sides with the estab- U.S. Government, Beirut, Lebanon, June
25-Aug. 19.
lished authorities. A labor leader Masaki Yoshimoto, professor, Depart-
i West Berlin said his workers ment of Literature, Hosei University,
wanted to stage counter-demon- Tokyo, Japan. June 25-Aug. 19.
Christianz Bore, student in economics
strations against the students. 1 from France, June 26-30.
DIAL NO 2-6264 ____________OPEN 12:45 P.M.

e

~'1~'

4 " yf
S
t
J 1

wUi~im

-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
THE STAR II, A 'SUBMERSIBLE,' or miniature submarine, is pictured above, aboard the USCGC
Woodbine, a seagoing buoytender. The Universit y's Institute of Science and Technology is rent-
ing the Star II from General Dynamics, Inc., fo r underwater research in connection with work
being done by its Great Lakes Research Division.
Star II Makes Exhibition Dive
Into Lake' Michigan for Press

SE 7 AN FOMN'SE ::;.:AI
IA' M :::::
j~I :r :;.f
N t _

"Amerikahaus" cultural

center

By THOMAS R. COPI
Special To The Daily
GRAND HAVEN, Mich.-"It was
as though it was raining dandruff
. . .dandruff all the way down,"
newsman George Fulk commented
last Friday. Fulk was the first non-
,scientist to ride the General Dyna-
mics Submarine Star II to the bot-;
- tom of Lake Michigan.
The Star II, which is being
rented by the University's Insti-
tute of Science and Technology;
° for Great Lakes research, is tech-
nically known as a 'submersible'
and is capable of carrying a two-!
-man crew to a depth of 1200 feet.
Lake Michigan is 923 feet deep;
'at its deepest point.
Fulk, representing WMKG-TV,'
Muskegon, was chosen in a blind
dzawing to represent the press
aboard the Star II in a special;
press' dive to a depth of 50 feet.
The "dandruff" Fulk saw out-
side the portholes of the 'mini-
sub' consisted, according to Char-
jes Pow ers, oceanographer for the
IST, of suspended organic mate-
rial, apparently the product of de-
caying plant and animal life.
TOM CORNELL
of the
Catholic Peace Fellowship
speaking on
DRAFT
RESISTANCE
..AND THE
-u~r E.U ~ A

The "underwater snow" prob-
blen was also encountered on ear-
lier dives, Where the bottom of the
lake was not visible, even though
the Star II was resting on it. How-
ever, in a dive made in the middle
of the lake, at a depth of 135'feet,
visibility increased to about ten
feet.
Prof. David Chandler, director of
the IST's Great Lakes Research
Division, said that the primary ob-
jectives of this first submarine ex-
ploration of Great Lakes depths
has been "to determine the feasi-
bility of using a vessel like Star
II in further Great Lakes re-
search."
Chandler, whose specialty is
aquatic biology, listed several
biological and geological studies
that are being undertaken on the
Star II dives:

-Deep rock formations will be
examined to learn more about the
nature of the lake basin. Scientists
aboard the Star II will try to ob-
serve the face of rock ledges and
take samples at depths of 600 to
700 feet to help improve sampling
techniques.
-Efforts will be made to learn
the living and movement patterns
of fish and of bottom-dwelling or-
ganisms on which fish feed.
Another question concerns the
depths of rooted plants. Some may
reach 150 feet or more, beyond
the range at which they can now
be effectively sampled.
-Bottom sediment will be ob-
served as fathometer readings are
made, These findings will be cor-
related to determine a pattern for
future readings.
Phone 434-0190
Eranca Ox.CARPENT ER READ

mnd"TWICE"is the only way to five!
II[BERTR. BRO~CC6I a' HARRY SAIi7AN. PANAVfSIONTECHNNCOOR>
1:00-3-0

5:00-7:10
9:20

"IT IS IMPOSSIBLE NOT TO
BE INTRIGUED!
Brutal massacres-grisly
sightS "-'.YDalys

presents
THE FOURTH ANNUAL SUMMER CONCERT SERIES
in RACKHAM AUDITORIUM
;air-conditioned)

' 1

L

DIAL 5-6290
RO)CERS. M ME HAi# ST ii"
RvB:RT R ISE
%ttucjC

OPEN 8:00 P.M.
--NOW SHOWING--
WOOLNES BROS. Preets
FERUiN J40DN
HUSKY LANSING BOWMAN
IIABIIYS IN
" by~h~ eL UXE

"HITS LIKE A TON
OF BRICKS!
his film should he
seen by a l!"-Cu.
ANGELO RIZZOLI o~c " . '" .". ' . ec~
JACOPEITI r~ PROSPER! AN10NIO CUIMAT!
R#Z ORTOLAN# " SIAN#S NIEYO Kli/(lrI.I
TECNNICOLoR/TECHNISCOPE ",,.
SHOW TIMES:
Mon.-Thurs. , 9 P.M.
Fri. 7, 9, 1 1
Sat. 7, 9, 1 1, Sun. 6,8$, 10

'
You W() i' Want /0 mis
any of these fine plays
iii Suimmer Festival '67'
MACBETH
THE PHYSICISTS
THE COUNTRY WIFE
LITTLE MARY SUNSHINE
Box offiCe open daily
1 -
A..
suen ,e

A

MALCOLM FRAGER, Pianist
Sonata in F major, Op. 10, No. 2.
Sonata in G minor, Op. 22.
Waltzes, Op. 39.
Prelude, Op. 12, No. 7.
March, Op. 12, No. 1.
Sonata No. 3, Op. 28.
MONIQUE HAAS, PianistM
Variations Serieuses.
Six Etudes .......
Trois Etudes.
Trois Preludes.
Deux Regards sur l'Enfant Jesus.
Quatre Caprices
Variations, Op. 27.
Le Tombeau de Couperin .
MICHEL BLOCK, Pianist M
Sonata ilnA major, Op. 120.
Goyescas . .
Trois Mouvements de Petrouchka.

Friday, July?
..... .Beethoven
.. Schumann
..... Brahms
...... Prokofieff
.....Prokofieff
.....Prokofieff
)nday, July 10
Mendelssohn
Chopin
Debussy
.Debussy
.. Messiaen
Mihalovici
Webern
Ravel
onday, July 24
Schubert
Granados
.....Stravinsky

4'

I I.:

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan