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June 15, 1967 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1967-06-15

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THURSDAY, JUNE 15, 1967

TIME MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

THURDAYJUN 15,1967THEMICHGAN ~__

UN Body Rejects

POLICE SHOOTING:
Justifiable Homicide'

Ruling

Israeli

Censure

Soviets Request Emergency Session
Of Assembly; Kosygin May Attend

By The Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS - The Se-
curity Council rejected yesterday
a Soviet demand to .wipe opt
Israel's gains of Arab territory
won by war.
Secretary-General U Thant im-
mediately acted on a Soviet re-
quest 'for an, emergency special
Dodd Denies
Ftt
Accusations
For Senate
WASHINGTON (RP)-Thomas J.
Dodd (D-Conn) swore before his
Senate colleagues yesterday that
he had never cheated the govern-
ment out of a cent.
"Many the vengance of God
strike me if I'm telling you a lie,"
he declared.
"It is my life that is at stake,"
he cried. "I would rather be dead
than be dishonored."
Pleaded Case
In a firm, steady voice that
sqmetimes rose to a shout, Dodd
pleaded his case against the cen-
sure move recommended by the
Senate ethics committee
The bulk of Dodd"s initial de-
fense speech wasadenial'that he
ever- ordered his bookkeeper to bill
both the government and private
organizations for ,travels on which
he conducted official business and
also addressed meetings or con-
ferences.
. The ethics committee said Dodd
requested and accepted dual pay-
ments for seven trips over a four-
year period.
Recommended Censure
It also charged that he spent
for personal purposes at least
$116,083 in funds collected at po-
litical events-.
On those counts, the panel rec-
ommended that Dodd be censured
for conduct bringing the Senate
into dishonor and disrepute.
Dodd maintained that the
money collected at seven testi-
monial affairs was a gift, to be
used as he saw fit. He said it was
spent to pay political debts and to
offset the costs of office.
Solemn Silence
Dodd blamed the double billings
on sloppy bookkeeping.
As the Senate sat in judgment,
Dodd's self-appointed defender
Sen. Russell B. Long (D-La) toyed
with his glasses, passed messages
to Dodd's lawyer, and laughed
sympathetically as Dodd told of
R his troubles with his bookkeeper.
Other Senators sat in solemn
silence. -

session of the General Assembly
to renew Moscow's anti-Israel
campaign.
Amid reports that Premier
Alexei N. Kosygin may attend the
big session, Thant sent out tele-
grams to the 122 members of the
United Nations seeking their re-
action to calling the Assembly in-
to session.
If he gets 62 favorable replies
he could issue a call tomorrow for
a session within 24 hours. Most
delegates anticipated he would get
the required affirmative replies
and they prepared to go into an
emergency session Saturday.
NATO Meeting
In other diplomatic develop-
ments, foreign ministers of the
North Atlantic Alliance meeting
in Luxembourg strongly support-
ed the establishment of a lasting
peace in the Middle East.
But they skirted any suggestion
of how it should be done or who
was to blame for the war.
The rapid developments came
after the 15-nation council killed
a Soviet resolution demanding
that Israel be branded an aggres-
sor, and ordering Israel to sur-
render land it won in Egypt, Jor-
dan and Syria in the six-day war.
The Soviet defeat came on votes
on key paragraphs.
Condemn Israel
The request for vigorous con-
demnation of Israel as an aggres-
sor failed to get the nine votes
required for approval of a resolu-
tion in the council. Only four
nations - the Soviet Union, Bul-
garia, India and Mali--voted for
it. The other 11 members ab-
stained.
The demand for an uncondi-'
tional and immediate withdrawal
of Israeli troops from Arab-held
territory mustered six favorable
votes.
Abstaining on both votes were
the United States, Britain, France,
Nationalist China, Argentina, Bra-
zil, Canada, Denmark and Japan.
U.S-Soviet Clashes
The vote in the council came
after a long and rancorous debate.
It was marked by sharp U.S.-
Soviet exchanges and bitter de-
nunciations of the United States
by Arab delegates.
Thant withheld the poll of the
UN members on the special emer-
gency session until he felt con-
vinced that the council was unable
to act on the Middle East situa-
tion.
The defeat of the Soviet resolu-
tion and the announced Soviet'
intention to veto a U.S. resolution
gave him the go-ahead.
It would be the fifth emergency
special session in the history of
the United Nations. The first four
were convened at the request of1
the Security Council.

May Cause New Tampa Riots
TAMPA. Fla. (A)-A ruling that ;facilities. But mostly, they said, and demonstrators who are
a white policeman committed jus- Negroes were bitter about their going to accept this ruling."
tifiable homicide when he shot a treatment by police. ".I trust and I hope and I
Negro youth brought a threat of Antinori said Chambers was that the calmer and more rea
new violence to this riot-torn city, about to escape after committing able members of the Negro c
The ruling was a result of an burglary and grand larceny when munity will accept this t
inquiry by State Attorney Paul he was stopped by Calvert's bullet. rightly, because this is an exi
Antinori into the killing of 19- "Under the facts, circumstances, sion of the law."
year-old Martin Chambers on Sun- evidence and law of the State of It is thought that the
day by Patrolman James R. Cal- Florida, Antinori said, "the death youth's mother, Janie Bell Ch
vert. of Martin Chambers must be ruled bers. probably would take
The death of Chambers. who justifiable homicide." action against the city, and w
was shot in the back, triggered "You're going to have a very be given the help of NAACP

I

-Associated Press
RAILROAD BRIEFING
Secretary of Labor Willard Wirtz, flanked by De fense Secretary Robert McNamara and Transpor-
tation Secretary Alan Boyd, talked to newsmen yesterday at the White House after a meeting of
President Johnson and his cabinet. Johnson asked the three men to brief reporters on the impor-
tance of quick legislative action on an administr ation bill aimed at heading off a nationwide rail-
road strike.
SAUDI ARABIA FIRST:
USe. Oil Industries Optimistic
Arabs Will Resume Output

I
I
3
I

three nights of shooting, burning,
and looting in slum areas here.
Four Alternatives
Negro leaders had predicted that
if Calvert were found blameless,
an uneasy truce reached Tuesday
night might be shattered by the
return of the mobs to the streets.
"As I see it," said James A.
Hammond, director of Tampa's bi-
racial committee, "the Negro has
four alternatives."
The first, which he begged Ne-
groes not to choose, would be to
take the fight for a better life back
into the streets. Such a course,
Hammond said, would lead to
"major catastrophe and endanger
the lives of many people.'
The other courses of action
Hammpond offered were a grand
jury investigation of the shooting,
civil action against the city, and
the dismissal or resignation of
Calvert.
Negro leaders walking the streets
during the daytime lulls in the
rioting heard complaints about
shabby housing, joblessness, and
poor education and recreational

small segment of violent people yers if she asked for them.
Thieu Announces Candida
For Vietnamese Presidene'

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-The return to
full production by Saudi Arabia,
largest oil source in the Middle
East, has buoyed U.S. hopes that
other Arab nations will follow
suit.
"It would seem the others would
follow along," a spokesman for the
oil industry said here yesterday.,
He added, "But if they don't all

of the major oil companies will
eventually be hurting somewhat.
Oil operations also are reported
to have restarted in Algeria. They
still are shut down in Iraq, Libya
and Kuwait.
Tankers are loading and steam-
ing to. various world ports with
cargoes of oil. But an embargo
imposed by most of the Arab na-
tions forbids taking their oil to
the United States or Britain.

World News Roundup

By The Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea - About
32,000 students battled riot police
here and thousands demonstrated
elsewhere in South Korea yester-
day, trying to force President
Chung Hee Park to call a new
general election.
In the election President Chung
Hee Park's ruling Democratic Re-
publicans won 130 of the 175 Na-
tional Assembly seats. Park has
admitted irregularities in some dis-
tricts and has ordered a thorough

off a nationwide railroad strike.
The GOP leadership said the
choice is "compulsory arbitration
or national chaos."
NEW YORK-Nine top civil'
rights leaders announced yesterday
that for the first time in the
movement's history they are back-
ing a project to concentrate their
full power in one city at a time.
The city they chose was Cleve-
land, Ohio.
*' * *

Egypt and Syria also have rec-
ommended the Arab countries use
oil as a bargaining lever in any
negotiations arising from the
Arab-Israeli war. Industry sources
here say, however, they are hope-
ful the oil crisis will be over by
the end of the month.
The embargo is not expected
to affect the United States, an
industry spokesman said, since
very little of the. oil produced in
the Middle East and North Africa
is shipped to this country.
Suez Closed
The ships are taking the long
route because the Suez Canal is
closed by sunken vessels, according
to Egyptian authorities. No esti-
mate was given as to how long it
would ake to reopen the water-
way.
However, in Washington retired
Lt. Gen. Raymond A. Wheeler
said that Egypt should be able to
open the clogged Suez Canal even
if several ships have been sunk in
jit.
Wheeler, 81, headed the United
Nations team that cleared the
canal in less than three months
after the 1956 Middle East war.
The Egyptians have been oper-
ating and improving the canal
very satisfactorily, Wheeler said in
an interview yesterday. "They are,
very excellent technically and me-
chanically," he added.

International Classics
presents
GIOVANNA RALLI
and
ANOUK AI.MEE
in
LA F UGA
Mon.-Thurs.: 7-9
Ann Arbor, Michigan
210 S. Fifth Avenue
761-9700

SAIGON (R)-The South Viet-
namese chief of state, Nguyen Van
Thieu, announced his presidential
candidacy yesterday, challenging
his military colleague Premier
Nguyan Cao Ky.
Over a month ago Ky declared
his intention to run in the Sept. 3
election against the eight civilian
candidates also in the race.
"I have decided I will run,"
Thieu announced.
American officials, seeking to
prevent diversion o'f military at-
tention from the war effort, had
tried to persuade Thieu not to
enter the campaign.
Thieu, 44, is a lieutenant gen-
eral in South Vietnam's army. Ky,
37, is a vice marshal who con-
Presents
Stan Laurel
and
Oliver Hardy
in
1. A CHUMP
AT OXFORD
PLUS
2. OUR
RELATIONS
That inimitable duo in
their most hilarious
SOUND features.
Friday and Saturday
7:00 and 9:05 P.M.
ARCH ITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
STILL ONLY 50cm "

mands the South Vietnamese
force.
They have worked together ti
years in the military governme
Thieu as the titular chief and
as the administrator.
When Ky, despite previous sta
ments that he would not run, a
nounced his candidacy May 12,
said he would withdraw if Th
decided to run.
The premier has since chani
his mind, saying "I am in it
stay."
Ky has been campaigning vi
orously. With help from the I
formation Ministry, he has pl
tered the countryside with sig
saying. "The government of Ngu
en Cao Ky is the government
the poor."
*t

DIAL 5-6
ROGiERS...HAMMERSTEN'
RO0BERT WISE

COLO
(Oi.OIn

investigation. . BOGOTA, Colombia - Troops
* took over the university city of
WASHINGTON-President John- Bogota Tuesday night after two
son won reluctant backing from days of student rioting over a 30
the House Republican leadership per cent increase in public trans-
yesterday for his formula to head portation fares.

JLtIEANDREWS-'c.i.mPLUMME
RICIARD HAYDN ' AD1
ELEANOR PARKER
RB IERT WISE IRICHARDR ODGERS
OSAR HAMMERSTEIN 111ERNEST LEHMAN
Mon. thru Fri. 2 P.M.-$2.00
Sot. 1:00-4:30-$2.00
Sun. 1:00-4:30-$2.50
All Nights 8 P.M.-$2.50
Children All Times--$1.00

r .; .,nS d O ,4" i pp : ..,y'.." V.' h4 .4M. .6"'.V.".' ::Y.'. :: S S".... y . ,y..r. .G.' W' .."'. .:1::.1.'.1":,.'.::f;.;. .; pry" So
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L'.

& <
t4t

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

-

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
Official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Satarday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day,
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organiztion notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
THUSRDAY, JUNE 15
Day Calendar
Conference-"International Confer-
ence on Systemati cBiology": Rackham
Lectur Hall, 8:30 a.m.
Bureau of Industrial kelations Sem-
inar -- "Management by Objectives":
Michigan Union, 8:45 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Conference-"Midwest Fulbright Con-
ference on Higher Education": Tele-
vision Room, South Quadrangle, 9 a.m.
Student Laboratory Theatre Program:
Dept. of Speech performance of
scenes from "Britannicus" by Racine
and "Don Carlos" by Schiller. Arena
Theatre, Frieze Bldg., Thurs., June 15,
4:10 p.m., admission free.
General Notices
Astronomical Colloquium: Fri., June
16, 4 p.m., Room 807 Physics-Astron-
omy Bldg. Dr. Robert P. Kraft. Mount
Wilson and Palomar Observatories,
Pasadena, Calif,, will speak on "The

Twisted Lives of Main Sequence Contact
Binaries as Performed by the Inmates
of the W UMa Asylum under the Di-
rection of the Count de Estrellas."
French and German Preliminary Ob-
jective Test: The Preliminary Objective
Test in French and German administ-
ered by the Graduate School for doc-
toral candidates is schehuled for Mon.,
July 10, from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Rack-
ham Lecture Hall. ALL students plan-
ning to take the test must register by
2 p.m. July 10, at the Information Desk
is the lobby of the Rackham Building.
For further information call the In-
formation Desk, 764-4415.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
General Electric Co., Detroit, Mich.
-Trng. Program for recent grads in
Data Processing field, IInformation Sys-
tems Division. Two yr. program with
formal and on-the-job trng. Covers
Time-Sharing, Data Communications,
Mass Storage Techniques, etc.
Legislative Reference Library, Albany,
N.Y.-Reference Asst.-Need bkgd. in
soc. sci., poli. sci, public admin., econ.'
Ingalls Shipbuilding Corp., Pasca-
goula, Miss.-Opportunities for engi-
neers, systems analysts, accountants,
auditors, estimators, planners, finan-
cial and budget analysts and naval
architects.'Varying exper. and ,degree
requirements.
City of Palo Alto Calif.-Supervis-
ing Director in the Division of Cul-
tural Activities. Need broad knowledge
of performing and visual arts with ad-
min. exper. in planning, organizing
and devel. a variety of programs and
activity in community arts.
Miniature Precision Bearings, Inic.,
Keene, N.H.-Field Sales and Engineer-

ing positions-Trng. will supplement
educ. and exper. to equip the person
to contribute solutions to customers'
application problems. Neew men with
creative tech. imagination.
Management Consultants, New York
-Material Procurement Manager re-
sponsible to vice-pres. operations.
Knowledge and exper. in purchasing
and production control, with EDP. Al- -
so, Underwriter-Personal Lines/Auto.
10-15 yrs. exper. in underwriting and
knowledge of EDP.
* * *
For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.
TEACHER PLACEMENT:
The following schools need teachers
for Sept., 1967:
Ann Arbor, Mich. (C.P.H.-Inpatient
School)-Reading Therapist.
Detroit, Mich.;(Redford Union)--H.S.
Chem., H.S. Math, J.H. Science/Math,
J.H. Math, Later Elem., 3rd Grade,
Elem. PE, J.H. English/SS, H.S. Adv.
English, Visit. 'Tch., Speech Corr., Cris-
is Room Tch., Reading Specialist.
Highland Park, Ill. (Twp. H.S. Dist.
No. 113)-Educable Ment. Hdcp., Sch.
Psychologist; Art, Girls PE, Boys P$.
Pinckney, Mich. - Sec. Math, J.H.
Math/Science, Earl Elem., Later Elem.,

Vocal Music, Art or Arts & Crafts, Ind.
Arts, Type A.
South Lyon, Mich. - Perceptually
Handicapped.
Ypsilanti, Mich. (East J.H. School)-
J.H. Home Ec., J.H. Ind. Arts.
* * *
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3200 SAB,
764-7459.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES {
. USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 SAB.
* * *
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk dance
with instruction open to everyone,
Fri., June 16. 8-11 p.m., Barbour Gym.
* * *
Christian Science Organization, Week-
ly testimony meeting, Thurs., June 15,
7:30-8:30 p.m., 3545 SAB.

CINEMA I1
Present
The
Loved One
with
JONATHAN WINTERS
ROBERT MORSE &
ROD STEIGER
JUNE 16-17
7-9:15 P.M.
AUDITORIUM A
ANGELL HALL

NOW SHOWING
DIAL 8-6416

U j

Phone 434-01304
N CAAP*ITfR R00D

The Area's Finest Drive-In is easy
to reach - 2 miles south of
Washtenaw Rd. on Carpenter.
BOX OFFICE
OPEN 7:00 P.M.

**POLANSKI'S
WILD SWING!'
"It compares as black comedy to John Huston's
'Bent the Devil,' Mr. Polanski has directed
with impressive ingenuity and comic speed!"
-Bosley Crowther, N.Y. Times
"A MERRY-GO-ROUND
OF EMOTIONAL
VIOLENCE!"
--William Wolf,
Cue Magazine
"TANTALIZING
AND HYPNOTIC"
-Judith Crist,
N.Y. World
Journal Tribune

HELD OVER

FIRST
RUN

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