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July 16, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-07-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OLDFISH, RADIATIONf
Television Series To Present Programs
Treating Historical, Scientific Subjects

'U' Facilities Aid Summer Relaxation

New Committee Members
Named at Regents'_Meetin

Several University television
series will present programs of
scientific, academic and general
interest this weekend.
Prof. Robert McCleary of the
psychology department is doing
this week's "Science: Quest and
Conquest" production, at 8:30 a.m.
this morning on station WXYZ-
TV.
Prof. McCleary's work, which he
feels is beyond even the frontiers
of research, is concerned with in-
ter-ocular vision. He had dis-
covered that even when connec-
tions are cut between the left and

right sides of the brain in goldfish
and cats one eye can still tell the
other what it knows,
Implications Seen'
This, Prof. McCleary believes,
implies the presence somewhere
of a primitive brain. If this sort
of thing holds true for man, he
thinks it may shed some light
on the subconscious, and may
prove a neural physiological basis
for Freudian psychology.
"The Frontier Thesis" of Fred-
erick Jackson Turner is the topic
for the fourth program in the
series called "The Western Way."
Prof. Niel Snortum, host of the
series, is joined by Prof. Howard
H. Peckham of the history depart-
ment, director of the Clements
Historical Library, on the program
"The Shaggy Continent," tomor-
row at noon, over station WWJ-
TV.
To Explain Theory
Prof. Peckham will use maps
and specially prepared sketch se-
quences in his explanation of the
major points of the theory, which'
"caused a whole generation of his-
torians to completely rewrite
American history," and to contrastj
it with the other methods of in-
terpreting American'history which!
existed prior to its publication in
1893.
Prof. James Van Allen, chair-
man of the physics department at
the State University of Iowa and
one of the naton's foremost re-
search physicists, will be inter-
viewed at 9:45 a.m. tomorrow on
the program "Radiation in Space,"
as a part of the "Accent" series on
WXYZ-TV.
Discovers Radiation
Prof. Van Allen discovered in
1958 belts of extremely high radia-
tion nearly completely surrounding
the earth, which pose one of the
major problems to manned space
flight. The belts, which begin about
500 miles up and extend to a
height ten to fifteen times the
radius of the earth, were named
the Van Allen belts in his honor.
"The Great Stamp Chase," a
study of "the world's number-one
Court Work
Group Meets
The University school of social
work is hosting juvenile court
workers from 18 Michigan coun-
ties this week,
The institute is being taught by
Prof. Mary Taylor, and has been

hobby, stamp collecting, will be
shown at 9 a.m. tomorrow as a
part of the University series "Un-
derstanding Our World."
Prof. Peter Gosling of the geog-
raphy department will be joined
by three specialist collectors from
the Ann Arbor Stamp Club on
station WXYZ-TV to talk about
their particular collections and
stamp collecting in general.
Assignments
Undertaken
Five off-campus assignments for
University faculty members were
approved by the Regents yester-
day.
Dr. Thomas Francis. Jr., chair-
man of the department of epi-
demiology in the public health
school was assigned to off-campus
duty from July 16 to Aug. 13. He
has been invited to attend the
First International Conference on
Congenital Malformations in Lon-
don and the Fifth International
Conference on Poliomyelitis in
Copenhagen.
The four other off-campus as-
signments went to faculty mem-
bers of the literary college. Prof.
Richard D. Alexander, assistant
professor of zoology and curator
in the Museum of Zoology, will
attend the meetings of the Inter-
national Congress of Entomology
at Vienna and will be off campus
from Aug. 7 to Sept. 10. He has
received a grant for this purpose
from the Entomological Society of
America.
Prof. Norman E. Hartweg, pro-
fessor of zoology and curator in
the Museum of Zoology, will be off
campus from June 25 to Sept. 1
while he negotiates with the Uni-
versity of Mexico and other Mexi-
can institutions preliminary to
preparing proposals to foundations
for the establishment of the Uni-
versity Center for Tropical Studies.
Prof. Robert R. Miller, also a
curator in the Museum of Zoology
and an associate professor of
zoology, will be off campus from
Aug. 1 to Sept. 15 to carry out
field studies on the fishes of Utah,
Arizona, New Mexico and Colo-
rado.
Prof. Claude W. Hibbard, pro-
fessor of geology and curator in
the Museum of Paleontology, will
be away from June 21 to Sept. 1 to
visit museums in Europe for study
of vertebrate fossils, participate in
field trips and attend the Interna-
tional Geological Congress at
Copenhagen.

Nineteen appointments to com-
mittees were approved by the Re-
gents yesterday.
Prof. Samuel K. Clark was ap-
pointed for a four-year term, end-
ing June 30, 1964 on the Executive
Committee of the College of En-
gineering, succeeding Prof. Mau-
rice J. Sinnott.
On the Library Council, Deans
Fedele F. Fauri and William N.
Hubbard, Jr., were named for four
year terms, ending June 30, 1964
succeeding, respectively, Prof.
Harry B. Benford and R. Reed M.
Nesbit.
Broadcasting Committee
On the University Committee
on Broadcasting, Prof. Charles W.
Joiner was appointed to succeed
himself for a three-year term,
ending June 30, 1963, and Prof.
Gilbert Ross was named for a
similar term to succeed Dean Earl
V. Moore.
Indefinite terms have been given
to five appointees to the Advisory
Committee of the Bureau of Pub-
lic Health Economics. Named were
Dean Fedele F. Fauri, Roger W.
eyns, William N. Hubbard, Jr.
and Robert S. Ford and Rensis
Likert.
Prof. Alfred F. Conrad was ap-
pointed for a three-year term,
ending June 30, 1963, on the Com-
mittee on American Institutions
Lectureship and Professorship,
succeeding Prof. Allan F. Smith.
Succeeds Self
Appointed to succeed himself
for a two-year term on the Execu-
tive Committee of the Museum of
Art was Prof. Albert P. Mullen.
On the Executive Committee of
the Bureau of School Services
there were three appointments
for three-year terms, ending June
30, 1963. Named to succeed them-
selves were Clyde Vroman and As-
sistant Dean Arlen R. Hellwarth
while Dean James B. Wallace was
named to succeed Dean Earl V.
Moore.
Prof. Maurice J. Sinnott and
Dr. Walter J. Nungester were
named to succeed themselves for
four-year terms, ending June 30,
1964, on the Executive Committee
of the Michigan Memorial-Phoe-
nix Project.

There were two appointi
to the Executive Committee a
University Research Institute
Prof. Burton L. Baker nam
succeed himself and Prof.
M. Fitts to succeed Prof. J
T. Wilson.

-Daily-James Warneka
STUDY BREAK-These relaxed University students have found a way to 'beat the heat' between
classes during the hot summer months. They, like many others, find companionship and comfort
in the Union cafeteria, where a game of cards provides all the exercise one could wish in such
weather. As a matter of fact, it is a good ideo in the winter, too.

PROF. RUTH A. LOCHER
... social worker dies

Social Service
Director Dies
Miss Ruth A. Locher, associate
director of social service at Uni-
versity Hospital, died there Thurs-
day night, following a short ill-
ness.
Miss Locher was a specialist in
medical social work. She joined
the hospital staff in 1951, and in
1957 was appointed assistant pro-
fessor in the school of social
work.
WashtenaW County chairman
for the National Foundation, Miss,
Locher was active for many years
in March of Dimes fund raising
campaigns.
She was the first social worker
ever invited to address the Inter-
national Congress on Poliomyelitis
when in 1957 she spoke on the re-
habilitation of polio patients at
Geneva, Switzerland.

PSYCHOLOGY:
Students'
Curriculum
Examined
Four psychology department
chairmen are spending the sum-
mer at the University working on
a "Study of the Undergraduate
Curriculum in Psychology."
Co-directors of the project are
Profs. Wilbert J. McKeachie and
John E. Milholland of the Uni-
versity psychology department. It
is supported by a $24,090 grant
from the National Science Foun-
dation.
The four visiting prc essors are:
Prof. Lawrence E. Cole, Oberlin
College; Prof. William A. Hunt,
Northwestern University; Prof.
Robert Leeper, University of Ore-
gon and Prof. Wilbert S. Ray,
Bethany College.

IN JULY MEETING:
Faculty Appointments
Approved by Regents

PROF. ROBERT C. POOLEY
... 'growth in writing'
To Discuss
'Grammar'
Prof. Robert C, Pooley, chair
man of the department of libera
studies at the University of Wis
consin, will lecture on- "Growtl
in Writing Through Grammar,
at 4 p.m. Monday in Aud. B, An
gell Hall.
Prof. Pooley is the author o
"Teaching English Usage" and
"Teaching English Grammar." He
has also co-edited such books a
"The United States in Literature
and "Exploring Life Through Lit
erature."
The lecture is the fifth in the
tenth annual Conference Serie
for English Teachers, on aspect
of the subject: "Problems in the
Teaching of High School Eng
lish."

Six, appointments to the faculty
of The University's Dearborn Cen-
ter received the approval of the
Regents yesterday.
David D. Burks, intelligence re-
search specialist in Latin Ameri-
can affairs for the U.S. Depart-
ment of State, was appointed as-
sociate professor of history.
Prof. John T. Dempsey, political
news analyst for WJBK-TV in
Detroit and an associate profes-
sor of political science at the Uni-
versity of Detroit, will be an as-
sociate professor of political sci-
ence on a half-time basis.
Allan R. Emery, who has been
with the research and develop-
ment laboratories of Socony-Mo-
bile Oil Company in New Jersey
for two years, was appointed as-
sistant professor of chemistry.
Appointed on a half-time basis
for the spring semester of the
1960-61 year was Prof. Emanuel
C. Hertzler, Dr. Hertzler, who hasi
been on the Kent State Univer-
sity faculty since 1948, will be an
associate professor of biology. He

will spend the first semester on a
health traineeship provided by
the National Institute of Health.
The other two Dearborn Center
appointments provide additional
faculty for the existing programs
in engineering and business ad-
ministration. Prof. Edward L.
Eriksen, professor emeritus of en-
gineering mechanics, was ap-
pointed lecturerhin engineering
mechanics for the fall semester.
I4

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DIAL
5-6290

I,

Miss Locher taught physical planned in cooperation with the
therapy and pediatrics at Univer- staff of the Michigan Department
sity Hospital. of Social Welfare.

CAF E
PROMETH EAN
- -- 508 E. William
Wed. and Thurs.-Poetry
Fri. and Sat.-Folk songs
(50c door charge)
Sunday-JAZZ-9-12 p.m.
(75c door charge)
Open daily 8 p.m. to 2 a.m.

A TO rSAWYER KIND OF SOY;
DAYI LDM
4 _ as
. JULIE ADAMS-" OHN ADAR
-
EXTRA:
"GALA DAY IN DISNEYLAND"
COMING: "HERCULES UNCHAINED"

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(Continued from Page 2)

Wed.-Sat., July 20-23, 8:00 p.m. Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre, William Shake-
speare's "As You Like It." Tickets avail-
able daily Monday through Saturday,
10 a.m. to 5 p.m., at the box office foe
"As You Like It," and the remaining
productions of the Playbill, Summer
Wed.-Sat., July 27-30, William Inge's
"Picnic;" Wed.-Sat., Aug. 3-6, Mozart's
"Don Giovanni." Tickets for "As You
Like It" and "Picnic" are $1.50 and $1.00
for the Wednesday and Thursday per-
formances, and $1.75 and $125 for the
Friday and Saturday performances.
Tickets for "Don Giovanni" $1.75 and
$1.25 for the Wednesday and Thursday
performances, and $2.00 and $1.50 for
the Friday and Saturday performances.
Recitals
Chamber Music Concerts: Two con-
certs of Chamber Music will be pre-
sented by members of the School of
Music faculty in Rackham Lecture
Hall on Sun., July 17, with perform-
ances at 3:00 and 8:30 p.m. Included on
the first program are compositions by
Schubert and Mozart. Included in the
second concert program are composi-
tions by Beethoven and Mozart. Open
to the public.
Armando Ghitalla of the Boston Sym-
phony Orchestra will present a trumpet
recital on Mon., July 18 at 11:10 a.m. in
the Michigan Union Ballroom, as a
part of the 12th annual National Band
Conductors Conference which will be
held from July 18-22, Forums, clinics,
demonstrations, recitals and rehearsals
will be taking place each day in the
Michigan Union.
Lectures
Radiobialogy Lecture: D~r. Tuneo Ya-
mada, Faculty of Science, Nagoya Uni-
versity, Japan, will discuss "The Bio-

chemistry of Embryonic Induction" at
8 p.m., Mon., July 18 in Room 6423
Medical Science Bldg.
Lecture: "Growth in Writing Through
Grammar" will be discussed by Robert
C. Pooley, Chairman of the Department
of Liberal Studies, University of Wis-
consin on Mon., July 18 at 4 p.m. In
Aud. C.
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for Herbert
Edward Neil, Jr., Economics; thesis:
"Effects of Inflation Upon the Incomes
and Asset values of Consumer Spend-
ing Units, 1949-1958," Mon., July 18,
2A Econ. Bldg., at 3:30 p.m. Chairman,
J. B. Lansing.
Doctoral Examination for Bhogilal
Bhakwandas Sheth, Pharmaceutical
Chemistry; thesis: "Rheology of Phar-
maceutical Emulsions," Mon., July 18,
2525 Chemistry Bldg., at 1:30 p.m.
Chairman, A. M. Mattocks.
Placement Notices
State of Connecticut. Clerk, Tax
agent, industrial instructor-painting,
sr. serologist, microbiologist.
Public Huron Clinton Metropolitan
Authority, Design work on projects for
park, utilities, etc. B.S. in C.E.
Swift and Co. Man for work in pro-.

cess and equipment development. B.S.
in Ch.E. Also man, work in production
and improved processing methods in
soybean, cotton-seed oil and feed mills,
B.S. in Ch.E. or M.E. Mining Engineer.
Man with B.S. in M.E. for agricultural
chemical research.
General Electric. Waterford, New
York. Chemical Engineers.
Large Management Engineering and
Consultant Firm, with branch in Ohio,
needs man with E. E. Degree plus five
yrs. experience in fractional horse-
power motors for position of Chief
Electrical Design Engineer.
United States Civil Service Commis-
sion. We have a list of current techni-
cal and professional positions.
State of Michigan. Exams for Insti-
tution Business Executives, Industrial
Health Engineer and Insurance Execu-
tives.
A.C. Spark Plug Division. Flint. Pro-
ject Engineer, Jr. Engineer, Chem. En-
gineer, Project Engineer, Design En-
ginees, Packaging Engineer, Ceramic
Engineer, Research Engineer, man with
M.S. or Doctorate in Physical Chem.
for original research in field of fiber
technology. Research 'Chemist, Jr. or
Project Engineer, Market Analyst, Col-
lege Grad in Training-Production
Control,

INTERVIEWS
The following companies will inter-
view at the Bureau of Appointments,
4021 Admln. Bldg. Call Ext. 3371 for an
interview appointment.
Mon., Tues., Wed., July 18, 19, 20
United States Information Agency,
Binational Centers, Wash., D.C. Loca-
tion of work-Latin America, Iran,
Burma, Thailand, Indonesia, vietnam,
Turkey and Lybia and Somalia, Africa.
Qualifications: 1. Citizen of U.S. or
naturalized for 10 years; if married,
spouse must also be a citizen or nat-
uralized for 10 yrs. 2. Minimum of B.A.
3. Fluent speaking knowledge of lan-
guage of the country to be assigned or
if candidates not available for these
positions with languages, appropriate
consideration will be given to candi-
dates with fluency In French or lan-
guage closely related to that country.
4. Age 23-55. 1. Teacher of English as
a foreign language. 2. Director of Ac-
tivities. 3. Director of Courses. 4. Ad-
ministrative Director of Centers. Addi-
tional information on the positions as
well as the program are available in
the offie,
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 4021 Admin.
Bldg., Ext. 3371.

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h"oAB rATH

V

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Masses, 6:30, 8:00, 9:30, 1 1 :00 A.M.,
12:00 noon and 12:30 P.M.
Holyday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00 and 9:00
A.M., 12:00 noon and 5:10 P.M.
Week-day Masses 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00 and
9:00 A.M.
Novena Devotions: Wed. evening, 7:30.
Class in fundamentals of the Christian faith,
Monday and Thursday evenings at 7 P.M.

ENDING
TODAY

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NO 8-6416

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61

OUR MAN iN HAVANA
e Alec Gune~ss c-
Burl Ives-Maureen ara-Ermie Kovacs
Noel Coward-Ralph Richardson- Jo Morrow
AND

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SAM lOK "- wumr
TAYLSE cuFFrID'EIs

NOW

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THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgwood
Lester F. Allen, Minister
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
1 1:00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Avenue
Ernest R. Klaudt, Pastor
Orville H. Schroer, Parish Minister.
9:30 A.M. Worship Service.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw NO 2-3580 ,
Wm. S. Baker, Campus Pastor.
Patricia Pickett, Raja Nasr, counselors
Sunday Morning Worship at 9:60 and 10:30
A.M., Mr. Van Winkle speaking.
Student Coffee Hour at 11:30 A.M., Lewis
Room.
Tuesday, 8-10 P.M. "Conversation with Punch"
at the Guild House, 524 Thompson.
Grad Group dinner, Friday, July 22 at church,
followed by Dr. William Baker speaking on
"Questioning the Faith."
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
of Ann Arbor
Washtenow at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Donald H. Meyer, Ministerial Interne
Summer Sunday Evening Series, 8:00 P.M., Mr.
Donald Pelz, "Dither and Anxiety in Scien-
tific Performance,"
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
8:30 A.M. Douglas Chapel.
11:00 A.M. Sanctuary. Dr. Harold T. Janes
preaching, "Are Your Schools Good?"
Sunday Vespers, 6:15 P.M., WOIA--1 290, Dr.
Luchs.
Student Guild: Tuesday, 7:30, "Conversational
Punch" at Guild House, 524 Thompson.
Church School: 1 1 :00 A.M., crib through 9th
grade.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
(American Baptist Student Fellowship)
512 East Huron
Rev. Hugh D. Pickett, Minister
10:00 A.M. Worship Service, Mr. Pickett
11:00 A.M. Ministerial Talk Back.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDEN1
CHAPEL & CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Arthur L. Dauer, Vicar
William F. Eifrig, Director of Music
Sunday at 9:30: Bible study.
Sunday at 10:45: Worship service, with Holy
Communion. Sermon by the pastor, "How
To Sidestep Selfishness."
Gamma Delta: . Groups leave the chapel at
10:15 and 1:45 for outing at Bishop Lake
of Northeastern Region of Gamma Delta.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
Morning Service, 10:30 A.M.
University Bible Class, 9:30 A.M.
Evening Worship Service, 7:00 P.M.
MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH
411 Fountain Street
Rev. William Nicholas, Pastor
and Student Advisor. NO 3-0698
Sunday School,;9:45 A.M.
Worship Service, 11:00 A.M.
Training Union, 7:00 P.M.
Worship Service, 8:00 P.M.
Prayer Meeting, 7:30 P.M. Wednesday.
Cooperating with the Southern Baptist Con-
vent ion.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Hu-on Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Minister to students
9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Morning Worship.
"Goodness is no Elective," Dr. Rupert
preaching.
Studernt Picnic fl.tinn rand Vespers. LeaveWes-

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NO 2-6264

STARTING SUNDAY

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(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Gerald N. Kissell, Pastor
SUNDAY-
10:30 A.M. Worship Service.
7:00 P.M. "The Image of Man in Con-
temporary Literature." Dr. Sheridan

NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN

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