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July 14, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-07-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Uonterence
On Latin
To Begin
A conference on the Advanced
Placement program in Latin ,will
convene here this Friday, June 15.
The two-day session is spon-
sored by the University summer
session and the classical studies
department in cooperation with
the College Entrance Examination
Board and the University exten-
sion service.
Overview
The first meeting, with Prof.
Frank Copley presiding, will begin
at 9:30 a.m. Friday. Allan S. Hoey
,of the Hotchkiss School, Lakeville,
Conn., will speak on "Overview of
the AP Latin Program." Prof.
John L. Heller, chairman of the
classics department at the Uni-
.versity of Illinois and Prof. Mal-
colm MacLaren, chairman of the
classics department at Syracuse
University will speak on examina-
tions and grading, respectively.
Admissions director Clyde Vro-
man and Jack N. Arboiino, direc-
tor of the Advanced Placement
Program, will discuss "The AP
Program and the Colleges." At a
noon luncheon at the Union Prof.
Carolyn E. Bock, chairman of the
foreign language department at
Montclair State College will speak
on "The AP Program as a Con-
tribution to the Recruitment of
Latin Teachers."
Infiltration
The afternoon session will be
devoted to the introduction of the
advanced placement Latin pro-
gram into schools. Speakers will
be Prof. Harry L. Levy, dean of
students and classics professor at
Hunter College, Richard T. Scan-
lan of Edina - Morningside High
School, Edina, Minn., and Doris E.
Kibbe, Manchester High School,
Manchester, Conn.
DIAL NO 2-62641

Sister Reconnaissance Bomber

Programs
o Cover
ehavior
"Human Behavior: Social and
Medical Research" will be the
theme of a 56 - program radio
series this fall over the University
Broadcasting Service (WUOM).
The series will be produced by
Glen Phillips, who has conducted
extensive interviews throughout
the United States in the past six
months with leading educators,
doctors, sociologists, and psycholo-
gists in the field of human be-
havior and medical research.
Phillips has organized the series
in four parts: "Medical Research,"
"Behavioral Science Research,"
"Aspects of Mental Health" and
"The Challenge of the Aging."
The 16 medical research pro-
grams will feature three shows on
heart disease, three on tubercu-
losis and two on diabetes, finish-
ing with a broadcast on "The
Public and Communications in
Medical Research."
"What is Behavioral Science?"
heads off the second and largest
(24 shows) subdivision in the
series, on human behavior. High-
lights include two-part series on
"Juvenile Delinquency," "Religion
and Mental Health " "Man and
Machines" and one of the major
efforts of the entire series, a five
part discussion of "Behavioral
Science and the Law."
Paul Dudley White, Boston
physician, will discuss "Safe-
guards Against Mental Illness" as
one of the programs under "As-
pects of Mental Health." ,
"The Challenge of the Aging"
series will cover many aspects of
the problem in nine programs.
The National Association of
Educational Broadcasters and the
National Educational Television
and Radio Center provided the
grant-in-aid subsidizing the series,1
produced by the University Broad-
casting Service. The NAEB will
release it nationally.
To Perform
Organ Recital
Roy Johnson, '61M, will present
an organ concert at 8:30 p.m. to-
morrow in Hill Aud., in partial ful-

THUMBNAIL SKETCH:
Outlines Main Planks
Of Democrat Platform

By OVID A. MARTIN
Associated Press Writer
LOS ANGELES - Here is a
thumbnail sketch of the major
planks of the platform adopted
Tuesday night by the Democratic
national convention:
Foreign Policy - Restore the
nation's military, political, eco-
nomic and moral strength so that
it might more effectively lead the
free world in its search for a
stable peace and an expanding
world economy.
National Defense - Recast the
nation's military capacity in order
to provide forces and a diversity
of weapons sufficient to deter
limited or general aggressions.
World Trade - Press for re-
duction on foreign barriers to
United States products.
Economic Growth
National Economic Growth -
Pledges policies to speed rate of
economic growth. These would in-
clude an end of what was called
the tight money policy of the Re-
publicans, control of inflation, aid
to economically depressed areas,
broadening of minimum wage
benefits and planning for indus-
trial automation.
Agriculture - Raise price sup-
ports, use government payments,
food stamp program and expanded
program of foreign distribution
to boost farm prices and income.
Husing-Expand federal aid to
encourage building of two million
homes a year.
Medical Care
Medical Care-Expand the so-
cial security tax system to provide
funds for extending medical care
to the aged.
Education - Extend federal fl-
nancial aid for school construe-
tion and employment of teachers.
Natural Resources-Develop and
conserve natural resources for this
and future generations. The plank
says the present administration is
permitting them to waste or go to
selfish interests.
Urban Problems
Urban Problems - Establish a
federal department to aid cities
with problems of slum clearance,
urban renewal, water supply,
transportation, recreation, health
and other problems.
Civil Rights-Pledge full use of
powers of the federal government
to end racial discrimination in
voting, education, housing, em-

ployment, transportation and,
other fields.
Minimum Wage - Pledges to
raise minimum wage from $1 an
hour rate to $1.25 and to extend
coverage to several million addi-
tional workers,
Fiscal Policy - Pledges a bal-
anced budget except in periods of
emergency.or recession.
Taxes-Raise taxes if necessary
to meet unfolding demands at
home and abroad. But holds that
an expanding economy plus better
tax collection, policies should pro-
vide sufficient funds to meet most
government needs.

Prof. Hugh McLean of the Uni-
versity of Chicago will speak on
"Zoshchenko and the Soviet Con-
science at 4:10 p.m. today in
Aud. A, Angell Hall.
The lecture is sponsored by the
University Committee on the Pro-
gram in Russian Studies.

SISTER SHOT DOWN-This is an RB47 reconnaissance bomber similar to the one missing since
July 1, recently revealed shot down by the Russians over Soviet territory. The White House has
denied the plane ever flew over Soviet territorial waters or air space.
INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE:
U.S. TO Cite Progress in Education

I

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The 23rd International Confer-
ence on Public Education in"
Geneva will hear this week the
United States' Annual Report on'
the Progress of Education.
The four - member delegation
which, will present the United
States report includes two staff
members in the Office of Educa-
tion: Dr. Romaine P. Mackie,

Chief of Services for Exceptional
Children and Youth, and Dr. Fred-
rika M. Tandler, specialist for
International Organizations.
Other members of the delega-
tion are: Dr. Samuel M. Brownell,
Detroit Superintendent of Schools'
and former Commissioner of Edu-
cation, and Dr. Leo P. Black, As-3

sistant Commissioner in Charge of
Instruction, Colorado State De-
partment of Education.
Highlights of the report include
the following:
Enrollment in public four-year
colleges and universities has been
rising much faster than enroll-
ment in private institutions since
the fall of 1951-83.18 per cent in
public to 31.8 in private. The
difference is even sharper between
public and private junior college;
enrollment figures.
Graduate degrees conferred in
1959-60 reached an all-time high
of 486,000 compared with 436,979
in 1957-58. The 1959-60 figures in-

PLAYING
THROUGH
SATURDAY

TWO ENCORE

Cinemainadli
TON IGHT and TOMOR ROWj
at 7:00 and 9.00
FILM BIOGRAPHY
DR.TEHRLICHS MAGIC BULLET
1940j
Directed by WILLIAM DIETERLE
with
Edward G. Robinson, Ruth Gordon
THE FIRST ANIMATED CARTOON
GERTIE THE DINOSAUR
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 Cents

lude 401,000 bachelor's degrees, fillment of the requirements for a
75,700 master's degrees and 9,700 Bachelor of Music degree.
doctorates. "Prelude and Fugue in F major"
Americans 25 years old and over by Buxtehude will lead off the
in 1959-60 had 11 years of edcuca- program. Three selections by J. S.
tion compared to only 8.4 years for, Bach will follow: "Allegro from

those 25 and over in 1940-41. Il-1
literacy has dropped to 2.2 per
cent.
Major support of public schools
is at state and local levels. Of the
$11.9 billion spent on these schools
in 1957-58, $6.7 billion came from
local sources, $4.7 billion from
state governments, and less than
$.5 from the federal governments.
Total national expenditure for
public and private education in
1957-58 iwas $19.8 million. This
represents 5.39 per cent of the
national income.
The number of public college
and university students rose 4.2
per cent from 2.66 million in 1949-
50 to 3.78 million in 1959-60. In
kindergarten through grade 12,
enrollment was up from 28.7 mil-
lion to 42.7 million.
Total enrollment in the United
States public schools increased by
more than 15 million-or 48.4 per
cent-in the last decade.

Trio Sonata No. 5," "Prelude and
Fugue in C major," and "Three
Chorale Preludes on 'Nun komm,
der Heiden Heiland'."
Following the intermission.
Johnson will play Mendelssohn's
"Con moto maestoso" from "Son-
ata No. 3 in A major," Franck's
"Prelude, Fugue and Variation,"
and "Te Deum" by Langlais.

L

Organization
Notices

July 14, 1960
La Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia, Re-
freshments. July 14, 3-5 p.m., 3050
Frieze Building.

GRAD STUDENT COUNCIL Presents
SOCIAL H OUR
5-7 . . . each Friday in July
VFW CLUB
314 East Liberty
everyone must be 21 or over

"G----y--Dalso
"Gaba Day At Disneyland"

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A portrait of extraordinary
suspense...painted In

the broo
deceit...
crimson.
and the:
blaze of

black of
he frightening
f murder...
wlite-hot
passion i

DIAL NO S-6M9

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1 p
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i
n
R
iMMll ryQ l {
r
~ ,
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,
;>
s s
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{ f
r
' 5_ '.

I

Semi-Annual SALE...
Jacobson's Own No-Seam
Nylon Hosiery
Save during this sale of Jacobson's own
seamless nylon hosiery. Summer's
fashionable bare-leg look in reinforced
heel and toe, or demi-toe styles. Spice,
beige glow, or taupe. Sizes 8% - 11 s,m,l. j

pppp-

1\

,1)

LANA TURNER
AniTUCi A \ 11AA

Box of 3 pr.,3.00

F b far., 5.85

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