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July 13, 1960 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-07-13

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.1-Stars Clash

Today

Bart#SPORTS
by HAROLD APPLEBAUM

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(9'

NEW YORK ()--Vern Law of
the league-leading Pittsburgh Pi-
rates and Whitey Ford of the first
place New York Yankees are the
probable starting pitchers in to-
day's 29th All-Star Baseball Game
at Yankee Stadium.
New York Yankee officials fore-
cast a crowd of about 45,000 for
the first All-Star game at the sta-
dium since 1939. That was back
in the days when one All-Star
game a year was enough.
Exs-Red Wingy
Ted Lindsay
QuitSN NL
D E T R O I T (P)-Ted Lindsay,
one of the fiercest competitors the
game has ever known, announced
yesterday he is retiring after 16
seasons in the National Hockey
League.
Lindsay, who will be 35 before
the month is out, spent 13 seasons
with the Detroit Red Wings and
the last three with the Chicago
Black Hawks.
The 5 foot 8 inch, 165-pound
Lindsay scored 833 points-365
goals and 468 assists-for an all-
time NHL record for a left winger.
He competed in 999 games, miss-
ing one last season because of in-
jury that kept him from his goal
of 1,000. In his 16-year career he
spent more time in the penalty
box than any other player-1,635
minutes. Ho appeared in eight All-
Star games.
It was the combination of Lind-
say, Sid Abel, and Gordie Howe
that gave the Red Wings one of
the most powerful teams in NHL
history.
Lindsay won the scoring title
once but was as well known for
his battles on the ice as for his
playing ability.
"I don't want to become an
athletic bum," Lindsay said.
"Hockey has been wonderful to
me. The game and the people in
it have made my life a good one.
"I feel I could play one more
year, possibly two. But I don't
want to milk the thing. I'm leav-
ing with a good feeling.
"I have three children and I
want to be with them. My business
is at the point now where I would
be putting a couple of years ofI
hockey against a business future
and I know, after a great deal of
thought, that now is the time to
call it quits."

Manager Walter Alston of the
Nationals could not be faulted for
going to the Pittsburgh staff again
after the success of Bob Friend,
Elroy Face and Law in the first
game. The three Pirates didn't al-
low a run and gave up only one
hit in 5%/3 innings.
Law, a 30-year-old righthander
from Boise, Ida., was effective
Monday in Kansas City when he
bailed out Milwaukee's Bob Buhl
in the ninth. With men on first
and second and only one out, Law
retired Baltimore's Brooks Robin-
son and Cleveland's Harvey Kuenn
to end the game. In his last start
Saturday night at Philadelphia
he lost a 2-1 game. His record is
11 won and four lost.
Names Jackson
After the first three innings,
Alston is expected to turn to Larry
Jackson of St. Louis (10-8) and
possibly Stan Williams (8-2) of
his own Los Angeles staff to fin-
ish up.
Al Lopez, the Chicago White
Sox skipper who is managing the
American League team, leaned to-
ward Ford, the Yanks' 31-year-
old lefthander with a 5-5 record.

He worked Sunday in relief. In
Yankee Stadium, a southpaw who
can keep the ball away from left-
handed batters aiming at the
short right field fence, usually is
most effective. It was just the op-
posite in Kansas City with its
handy left field wall that yielded
three homers.
Wynn Follows
Ford probably will be followed
by Early Wynn (4-7), 40-year-old
Chicago righthander, and young
Dick Stigman (4-4), Cleveland
lefty. All three pitched Sunday.
Lopez used all the others on his
10-man staff Monday except his
own relief ace, Gerry Staley. How-
ever, any of the six who worked
Monday will be available.
When Commissioner Ford Frick
announced the rules for the two
games originally he said no pitch-
er could work in both games,
However, that was changed later.
All are eligible for both games.
The starting lineups will remain
the same under the rules of the
game. The starters, except pitch-
ers, must play at least the first
three innings. A pitcher may not
pitch more than three innings.

Jersey City Committee
Accepts Havana Team

JERSEY CITY, N.J. 01)-Jersey
City became a member of the
International League yesterday,
replacing Havana.
The city commission unani-
Golf ers Down
Canadian Duos
BUFFALO, N.Y. (A) - Walker
Cup star Ward Wettlaufer dropped
a three-foot birdie putt on the
373-yard, par 4 first hole a the
Country Club of Buffalo yesterday
to give the United States its sec-
ond straight extra hole victory
over Canada in the International
Cup golf series.
Canada's Stan Leonard and
Gary Cowan sent the feature
match of the pro-amateur team
event into a suddent death playoff
by beating Dow Finsterwald and
Wettlaufer 2 and 1.
Canada and the United States
finished with six points apiece
after the four 18-hole best ball
matches.

mously approved the contract with
the International League to bring
the Havana Sugar Kings baseball
club to Jersey City.
The triple AAA league's presi-
dent, Frank A. Shaughnessy, and
Parks Commissioner Bernard J.
Berry signed the contract leasing
Roosevelt Stadium to the ball club.,
TV Rights
Meanwhile, in New York, Gabe
Paul, general manager of the Cin-
cinnati Reds, signed a contract
with WNTA for radio and televi-
sion rights for the 34 home games.
The station announced the con-
tract, but did not reveal the terms.
Berry said the team would be
called the "Jerseys" Instead of the
"Reds," as had been originally
planned. Berry linked the rejec-
tion of "Reds" to the political
situation in Cuba, where the fran-
chise was formerly held.
The club was moved here be-
cause of the political situation in
Cuba.
Castano Awaited
It was hoped that Tony Castano,
present manager, would come to
Jersey City for the Friday game
with the Columbus Jets, although
he had announced that he was
going back to Havana.

LOS ANGELES-Slightly more than a year ago Peter Deland, USC
and Los Angeles Athletic Club swim coach, associates, and their
swimmers in the Southern California area agreed that an early out-
door meet was necessary as an additional tuneup for the AAU and
Pan American Games.
Now, one year later, the Pan American Games have come and
gone, the AAU meet is less than three weeks away and the Olympic
Tryouts are scheduled only a week after that. As a result, last year's
experimentmeet was renewed with great zeal last week.
The meet, with the improbable title of the Second Annual South-
ern Pacific AAU Los Angeles Senior Invitational Swimming and
Diving Championships, produced the most spectacular results of any
meet ever held in this, the newly crowned capital of the American
swim world.
When all 20 events had been completed the tally sheet showed
five new world, and nine American records up for approval.
Held in the Los Angeles Swim Stadium, sight of the 1932 Olym-
pic aquatic events, this three-day swim spectacular, which attracted
221 contestants, made 6ertain facts about American 1960 Olympic
hopes crystal clear.
DESPITE THE DISDAIN for records in the meet, none of the male
competitors came close to record performances in the distance
free-style events. True, Alan Sommers of Indiana, Bill Chase of Yale
and George Breen, the top three in the distances for the U.S. were
not here, but George Harrison and Gary Heinrich, rated just a notch
below the others, fell far short of record times.
At this stage it doesn't look like any of the Americans will be
in serious contention in the 400 or 1500 meters, in which Australia's
Konrads and Japan's Yamanaka appear to be untouchable.
Of the women only Cris Von Saltza, undisputed leader of the
American freestyle brigade, showed signs of being able to challenge
Australia's Dawn Fraser and Ilsa Konrads at Rome.
THIS GLARING WEAKNESS in the distances was, however, pushed
to the background by the stellar performances in the other events.
In the 100 meters freestyler Joe Alkire of San Diego set an
American record of :55.1 and added his name to the long list of
American challengers in this event. Lance Larson, a close second to
Alkire, set a world record at 100 meters butterfly (a non-Olympic
event), and an American mark at 200 meters butterfly.
BACKSTROKERS Bobby Bennett and USC senior Chuck Bittick,
who recently nailed down a berth on the Olympic water polo
squad, each took down a record and established themselves as odds-
on favorites in the tryouts and the games as well.
The 17-year-old Bennett, who served notice of future greatness
last summer, proved that he has come of age, with a time of 1:01.6
for 100 meters, a world record. Bittick, a scant yard behind Bennett
at 100, earned a record for himself as he set a new American mark
at 200 meters.
N THE BREASTROKE Paul Hait of the Santa Clara Swim Club
and Robbie Greisser of the LAAC burst into national prominence
with startling performances. Midwesterners Ron Clark of Michigan,
Bill Mulliken of Miami (0.), and Ken Nakasone of Indiana had been
rated tops in this event, but Hait erased Mulliken's record at 200
meters with Greisser less than a yard behind to proclaim a challenge
to the Eastern contingent.
IN THE WOMEN'S events Von Saltza swept her events, falling just
shy of records in each instance. However, the standout performance
on the distaff side was turned in by Lyn Burke, a Santa Clara team-'
mate of Von Saltza.
Burke first gained prominence by upsetting world record-holder
Carin Cone in the AAU meet last winter. Now, Burke has supplanted
Cone as the world's reigning backstroker as she brought home new
world records at both 100 and 200 meters.
Ann Warner in the breastroke and Nancy Ramey in the butter-
fly strengthened their positions by adding American records to their
collections.
One thing is certain--the nucleus of America's Olympic team will
come from this group of California standouts.

USED CARS
1953 PONTIAC. Automatic, new plugs,
exhaust. $245. NO 5-6203 evenings.
N12
MERC., '54, Monterey. H.T., R. & H.,
Overdrive. Solex glass. Clean. 22,000
miles. NO 2-7049 after 6 P.M. N10
PLYMOUTH, '55. Original owner. 38,000
miles. Motor excellent. Body rusted.
$295. Call after 7 P.M. NO 8-8451. N9
1948 PONTIAC. Great trans. R. & H.
Highest offer takes it. NO 2-301 N3
CLEAN '54 Volkswagon. Sunroof. New
WSW tires, safety belts, radio. NO
3-3893. N
EXCELLENT CONDITION. 1954 Buick
Special. 2 door, 4 nylon tires. Orig-
inal owner. Phone NO 2-4194. N8
BARGAIN CORNER
MEN'S short-sleeve sport shirt $1.00.
Skip-dents & seer-suckers sanforized
wash & wear, asstd. colors.
Sam's Store 122 E. Washington
Wi
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessor-
ies,'warranted & guaranteed. See
us for the best price on new &
used tires. Road service-mechanio
on duty.
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it"
1220 S. University at Forest
NO 8-9168
81
WHITE'S AUTO SHOP
Bumping and Painting
2007 South State NO 2-3350
S22
FOR RENT
CAMPUS-Large quiet rooms for men.
Low rates. Linens furnished. NO
3-4747. C30
GOOD STUDENT apartments close to
campus at 344 S. Division. Phone Mr.
Pray. F. A. Sergeant Co. Realtors,
NO 2-3259. C12
YPSILANTI: Ranch house, 3 bdrms.,
full basement. Near schools; good con-
dition, good neighborhood. Fenced lot;
unfurnished. $110 per month. Call HU
3-0790. C29
EDGE OF CAMPUS-a nice 2 room fur-
nished apt. Private bath, all utilities.
$75 a month. NO 8-7234. C27
FURN. 1st floor apt., 3 rms., bath, pri-
vate entrance, and laundry facilities.
All utilities paid, $110 per month.
Phone NO 3-0292. C26
REAL ESTATE
STOP and SEE
1804 CooIey Ave.
$16,500
By owner, three yr. old, three
bedroom ranch. Slate entry,
large living room, dining area,
Stile bath. Aluminum storms,
screens, gutters. Shrubs and
flowers. Lot 53x170x101x150
on quiet dead end street one
block from Wines and For-
sythe schools. 1804 Cooley
Ave. NO 3-6551.
SEE IT TODAY!!
GRAD STUDENT LEAVING. Nice home
with 2 bdrm., basement, large lot.
Phone NO 3-2595. RI
FOR SALE
HI FI PHONOGRAPH: Bozak speaker
system. Excellent sound. Low price.
NO 2-8081 evenings. B5
Read Daily Classifieds

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS.
DON'T MISS,
The Big Convention News!
Get your radio fixed almost
Immediately
Music Center
300 S. Thayer NO 2-2500
X8
Complete line of Hi Fi components
including kits; complete service on
radios, phonographs and
HI F1 equipments.
HI FI STUDIO
1317 South University
1 block east at Campus Theatre
X2
PIANOS-ORGANS NEW & USED
Ann Arbor Piano & Organ Co.
213 E. Washington NO 3-3109
X1
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington ' NO 2-1834
X3
Pia nos
MIRROR STYLE CONSOLE --
Used, perfect condition ..$189
USED UPRIGHTS-From ..$49
STEINWAY CONSOLE - Like
new. Special ............$995
GRAND PIANOS-From ... $295
NEW GRINNELL-Holly spinet
..-.--.--.---.-----------.$479
Organs
HAMMOND-Extra voice. Only
. ..........................$905
PORTABLE CHORD ORGAN
.----. ---.--...........$79

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Off-white leather billfold with
8 keys. Help I'm locked outl Contact
K. Moore, NO 2-3241. _ A3
ROOM AND BOARD
TIRED of restaurants? Eat better for
less at Alpha Chi. Sigma, 1319 Cam-
bridge. NO 2-8312. E4
BUSINESS SERVICES
NOW THAT summer has finally come,
it's time for hot dogs, hamburgers,
lemonade, and ice cream.
Get them all at
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard NO 5-7131
~Open every night 'til Midnight"
J721
TYPING: Theses, term papers, reason-
able rates. Prompt service. NO 8-7590.
t J12

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

SPECIAL
TEN -DAY
LINES ONE-DAY RATE
2 .80 .39
3 .96 .47
4 1.12 .54
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Call Classified between 1:00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
and 9:00 and 11:30 Saturday - Phone NO 2-4786

4

CAMPUS
OPTICIANS.

Most frames replaced
while you wait.
Broken lenses duplicated.
FAST service on all repairs.
240 NICKELS ARCADE
NO 2-9116 NO 8-6019

PERSONAL

ALL OAMPUS DANCE
League Ballroom
Friday nite 9-12
Stag or Drag

J3

- I
i
i0,
1$

I

GREAT SAVINGS-all Magazine subs
1 yr.: Time-$3.87, Newsweek-$3.50
Life & Spts. Illustrated-$4.00. Specia
Student Rates. NO 2-361. Fli

HENRY H.
CSlTlcVENSInc.
LONG
DISTANCE -L
MOVING %c. } 5''
r273 Broadway
.- Flint b, Michigan Bill
Phone Collect Stevens
Flint CEdar 4-1686 L.it. '40
For Lowe' Free Estimates a..ag.,r
Interstate Rates Every Friday
We own, operate, schedule and dispatch our own fleet of vans
for better direct service without transfer.

ANDY: Beer is dear, ain't it?
F42
SAM: Mon verre n'est pas grand, mais.
F43
Phone NO 2-4786
for Classified Advertising

Grinnel 's
323 S. Main St.

Michigan University
Graduation Rings.

X7

I

IIALLERS
717 North University
near Hill Auditorium

WANT ADS
THEg KEI PLACE
I Of MIW
NATIO'A

.PL AY
-A.-
GOLF COURSE
r U.S 23 .Saath Of Packard Rd

Now Distributed by Row, Peterson & Co.
SOCIOLOGY TEST QUESTIONS
A Test Guide; A Study Aid--Actual Final
Examination Questions
Join Your Fellow Students and
Instructors - Get Your Copy
at Your Bookstore .$1.00

-1

-1

.

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Camelet Brothers

SEMI-ANNUAL

SALE

Camelet Brothers

I

of CLOTHING and FURNISHINGS

I

These selected groups of clothing and furnishings are from our regular

stock of the finest of

imported and domestic merchandise. Reductions range from 20% to 60%.

-CLOTHING-

-FURNISHINGS

I

I

SUITS

SPORT COATS

I

Formerly
$125.00
$85.00
$75.00
$65.00
$59.50
$54.00
$49.50

NOW
$99.50
$63.75
$59.25
$52.00
$47.60
$40.85
$38.75

Imported
Argyles
and Wool

Imported Handmade
NECKWEAR

Formerly
$60.00
$55.00
$45.00
$35.00
$32.50
$22.50

NOW
$45.00
$41 .25
$33.75
$26.25
$24.35
$16.10

I

I

ALL WASH and WEAR SUITS

TOPCOATS, OVERCOATS,
TROUSERS
Reduced 20% to 33!/3%

SPORTSHIRTS
Reduced 33'/a%

HOSIERY Formerly
$6.50
$5.00
Reduced $4.50
331/3% $3.50
$2.50

NOW
$3.35
$2.35
$2.35
$1.95
$1.65

$7.50
$6.50
$5.95

Formerly
$13.50
$10.50

NOW
$8.95
$6.80
$4.95
$4.35
$3.95

4

p

Reduced 20%

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