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July 02, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-07-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

F__THEMICHIGAN DAILY

LEGE ROUNDUP:
J' of Washington Sets
dmission Requirement

..
.,
i

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

By JEAN SPENCER
SEATTLE--University of Wash-
gton Regents last week con-
rmed an admissions p o l i c y
iange that will require a 2.5 high
hool grade average for enter-
g freshmen, effective 1964.
A faculty-administrative ad hoc.
)mmittee drafted the change
ter 18 months of study. At least
specified units of college pre-
aratory subjects will also be re-
uired.
The committee reported re-
arch citing the high school
ade average as the most accu-
Lte single indication of perform-
ice in college-only one out of
n students averaging under 2.5
. high school remains in college
nger than six quarters, they
und.
In presenting the revisions to
)orms Full

At Berkeley
By FAITH WEINSTEIN
Special to The Daily
San Francisco-The University
of California at Berkeley is pres-
ently facing an "ominous" stu-
dent housing crisis, part of their
share of the nationwide problems
of coping with the recent sharp
increase in college students.
More than 3000 students have
been turned down for residence
hall housing, university officials
announced to the San Francisco
press recently, and hundreds more
are expected before fall.
"We are trying to help the stu-
dents not able to be accommo-
dated in the university residence
halls to find housing elsewhere,"
Ruth N. Donnelly, supervisor of
housing services at Berkeley said
rather desperately.
"We are now taking listings of
accommodations in the area, list-
ings of rooms in private houses,
apartments , . .''
Problem Mushrooms
But meanwhile, the problem
grows, as university enrollment is
scheduled for an increase from
about 19,000 last year to a maxi-
mum of 28,500 by 1965, according
to a decision of the university re-
gents last week.
Chances that residence halls
will be able to house the influx of
new students appear to be slim,
according to Dean of Students
William F. Shepard, becatse of
scarcity of funds. Present housing
units accommodate 2500 students,
with only 750 vacancies fo^ the
fall.
For the time being, unsuccess-
ful applicants for university hous-
ing are being advised that they
can, if they wish, go to the uni-
versity's Davis or Riverside cam-
pus, where limited living space is
still available.
Creates Furor
In San Francisco this an-
nouncement has created quite a
furor. A local columnist reported
that a local high school graduate
who plans to attend the university,
this fall was sent a letter last
week, telling him to "reply by re-
turn mail" if he wanted a room
in a dormitory. He did so, only to
find that all places had been
filled-by students from Los
Angeles.
According to the story, the
reason behind this was that re-
turn mail came from Los Angeles
by jet-and got to Berkeley in a
shorter time than it took the San
Francisco mail to get across the
bay.

the Regents, President Charles E.
Odegaard remarked that the "hu-
man cost in frustration and dis-
appointment to a student who has
failed" is perhaps greater than the
financial cost of student failures
to the university and state.
* * *
BOULDER-A new N a t i o n a l
Center for Atmospheric Research,
endowed by the National Science
Foundation and the University of
Colorado Corporation on Atmos-
pheric Research, will be located
somewhere in Colorado.
Walter Orr Roberts, recently
appointed director of the center,
commented, "The key to the suc-
cess of any research center is the
recruitment of key scientific staff
members. My goal is to select and
employ eight to 10 scientists rep-
resenting competence in meteor-
ology and atmospheric science.
The composition of the staff may
involve 30 to 50 per cent of sci-
entists outside the meteorology
field."
In discussing the future plans
of the center, once its staff and
facilities are organized, Orr said
it will be interested in "atmos-
pheric control, but the goal of
the center is to understand the
atmosphere. It will not be pri-
marily concerned with the specif-
ics such as weather forecasting
or weather control."
The four principle research
areas for the center are atmos-
pheric motion, energy exchange
process in the atmosphere, water
substance in the atmosphere and
physical phenomena in the at-
mosphere.
* * *
COLUMBUS - Registrar Ken-
neth B. Varner of Ohio State Uni-
versity recently discussed elim-
inating the traditional summer
vacation in favor of vacations
staggered over three academic
quarters
Theoretically the university
could operate at full capacity with
30,000 to 40,000 students in at-
tendance each quarter while 10,-
000 more vacation. Thus univer-
sity facilities would be fully util-
ized and cost would be kept down,
he remarked. The largest sum-
mer enrollment in ten years has
stimulated serious speculation on
the year-round plan, with over
8,000 at the university this sum-
mer.
Verner cited tradition as the
main drawback to conversion
to the year-round educational
schedule.
Whitehouse
To Lecture
Dr. William Whitehouse, presi-
dent of Albion College, will give a
summer session lecture on "Eco-
nomic Change and Higher Educa-
tion" at 4:10 p.m. Wednesday in
Aud. A, Angell Hall.
He will also address the Ann
Arbor Rotary Club. Whitehouse
has served as dean of liberal arts
at Wayne State University. He
received his doctorate from North-
western Michigan and holds hon-
orary degrees from the University,
Michigan State, Wayne State and
Ohio Wesleyan University.
He is chairman of the Board of
Trustees of Citizens Research
Council of Michigan. In 1958 he
was President of the Association
of American Colleges and has held
numerous national and state posi-
tions, including membership on
the executive committee of the

-Daily-Allan Winder
SUMMER HOUSE-August and patient, the empty fraternity house holds its breath through hot
Ann Arbor summer before chapter members arrive to begin autumn activities.
'AMPHITRYON 38':
Play Adapts Romantic, Myth

By JUDITH OPPENHEIM
"Amphitryon 38" which opens
at 8 p.m. Wednesday at the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre, is a play
which must be seen from the
beginning.
The opening scene finds Jupiter,
king of the gods, relaxing on the
clouds and gazing down at his
latest love, Alkmena, on Earth.
The play (pronounced aam-FIH-
tree-uhn) is the second in the
Playbill Summer 1960 series. It is
directed by Prof. Hugh Z. Norton
of the speech department, with
scenery and costumes by Ralph W.
Duckwall, Jr. of the speech de-
partment.
Greek Myth
The story of Amphitryon was
an old 'Greek legend, which
French playwright Jean Girau-
doux has revised. Giraudoux
claims that his story is the 38th
version of the original legend;
hence, the name of the play.
Actually, in adapting the Girau-
doux play to English, S. N. Behr-
man added his own touches to the
comedy making it the 39th ver-
sion, if Giraudoux's calculations
are correct.
The story deals with Amphi-
tryon, a Theban warrior who is
sent off to war to give Jupiter
a chance to assume his form and
make love to his faithful wife,
Alkmena. Difficulties follow when
Jupiter assumes a human shape,
because he has trouble thinking
like a man.
New Slant
Giraudoux's play is streamlined
mythology with a cunning new
slant on how the Olympian god
wooed and won the beautiful
chaste mortal. The French novelist
and playwright uses the drama to
make intriguing comments on the

advantages and disadvantages of
being with gods or men. The rela-
tionships among gods, men and
women is an important theme.
The play will run from Wednes-
day through Saturday. Season
tickets for the four remaining
shows of the Playbill, which after
"Amphitryon 38" include Shale-
speare's "As You Like It," William
Inge's "Picnic," and Mozart's

opera "Don Giovanni" are avail-
able, in addition to single tickets
for all the playbill summer pro-
ductions.
Tickets may be obtained at the
box office of the Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre which is open from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, and until
8 p.m. on performance dates. The
office will be closed this Monday
for the July 4th holiday.

FOR RENT
LEASE to organized group, 20 to 30
students. 1026 Oakland. See by appt.
only. NO 5-5291. C24
SINGLE ROOM for gentleman in best
Southeast residential section. NO
8-6171. C23
CAMPUS: 2 bedrm. furnished, near Law
School. Deluxe with air conditioner,
TV outlets, all new furnishings. Twin
beds with hotel deluxe innerspring
and mattress. Off-street parking pro-
vided: No vacancies at present, but
Sept. assignments now being taken.
NO 2-7787 days, NO 2-4351 evenings.
022
PLEASANT ROOM for bus. or college
women. For summer or fall. Near the
bus line. Breakfast privileges. $7.50
a week. Phone NO 8-6551. C20
RECREATION ROOM for rent facing
Huron River. 1 miles from campus.
To young, refined married couple
only. Phone after 6 P.M. or before 10
A.M., NO 3-5126. 017
GOOD STUDENT apartments close to
campus at 344 S. Division. Phone Mr.
Pray. F. A. Sergeant Co. Realtors,
NO 2-3259. C12
NEAR ST. JOSEPH'S. Three rooms, fur-
nished. Private bath. NO 2-5776, eve-
nings NO 2-5140. 'C1
CAMPUS - Clean furnished bachelor
apartment, $75. Three room apart-
ment, $95. 614 Monroe. NO 3-5224.
C2
REAL ESTATE
STOP and SEE
1804 Cooley Ave.
$16,500
By owner, three yr. old, three
bedroom ranch. Slate entry,
large living room, dining area,
tile bath. Aluminum storms,
screens, gutters. Shrubs and
flowers. Lot 53x70x101x150
on quiet dead end street one
block from Wines and For-
sythe schools. 1804 Cooley
Ave. NO 3-6551.
SEE IT TODAY!!
R
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessor-
ies. Warranted &guaranteed. See
us for the best price on new &
used tires. Road service-mechanio
on duty.
"You expect more from Standard
and you get t"
1220 S. Unversity at Forest
NO 8-9168
81
WHITE'S AUTO SHOP
Bumping and Painting
2007 South State NO 2-3350
S2
USED CARS
AN ECONOMICAL barrel of fun. Red
Isetta cony, R&H. Low mileage. Ex-
cellent condition. NO 3-0302. N6
'52 FORD 2-dr. coupe; excellent trans-
portation. Radio, new tires. $125. NO
2-2110. N4
1948 PONTIAC. Great trans. R. & H.
Highest offer takes it. NO 2-3061. N3
CLEAN '54 Volkswagon. Sunroof. New
WSW tires, safety belts, radio. NO
3-3893. N
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS wanted to Cape Cod area;
leaving June 30, returning July 4.
Call NO 2-3241; after 5, NO 8-6101.
GI

Haber Forecasts Recession,
Seeks Unemployment Study

NES
2
3
4

ONE-DAY
- 80
.96
1.12

SPECIAL
TEN -DAY
RATE
39
.47
«54.

Figure 5 overage words to a line.
Call Classified between J:00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
and 9:00 and 11:30' Saturday - Phone NO 2-4786

Warning that a recession "defi-
nitely appears to be in the mak-
ing," Prof. William Haber of the
economics department suggested a
Presidential commission to reap-
praise the nation's unemployment
system Thursday at a convention
in Colorado Springs.

PROF. WILLIAM HABER
.. . predicts recession

D AILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

."The end of each recession in
the post-war period has left us
with a higher percentage of job-
lessness," he said, advocating pre-
paredness. Haber is senior mem-
ber and former chairman of the
Federal Advisory Council on Em-
ployment Security.
"After the 1949 recession, un-
employment averaged three per
cent; after 1954, four per cent;
and now, after 1958, we appear to
accommodate ourselves with five
per cent average unemployment.
The end of the next recession,
which some expect in 1960-61, is
likely to leave us with six or even
seven per cent unemployed," he
explained.
Criticism Widespread
Haber discussed "widespread,
criticism" of the present unem-
ployment system in use for 25
years.
He said labor unions contend'
that benefits are too' low, that the
duration of benefits is too short,
and that too many workers are
improperly disqualified from bene-
fit rights altogether.
Management complains that
costs are too high and that in cer-
tain states (e.g. Michigan) the
burden of unemployment insur-
ance costs has unfavorable conse-
quences to inter-state competition,
he continued.
Raps Stopgaps
:saber warned against "pallia-
tives, designed only to deal with
one grievance or gap," in pro-
posed changes in the federal pro-
gram. iie called for "thorough,
patient and objective" reevalua-
tion as opposed to piece-meal
handling of the problem.
"The time for reappraisal is
now, not when we are in the midst
of the next recession and have no
choice but emergency and tempo-
rary measures," he stressed.
Haber is co-author of a major
new study of unemployment which
will be published Sunday.
To Evaluate
Use of Theme
The English department will
sponsor a discussion on "Evalu-
ating the Theme" at 4 p.m. Tues-
day in Aud. C, Angell Hall.
Members of the panel will in-
clude Ruth L. Chamberlain, Wa-
terford Township High School;
Beverly Arment, Mt. Pleasant
Junior High School; Carl G.
Wonnberger, Cranbrook School,
Bloomfield Hills; and James W.
Downer of the University English
department.

BARGAIN CORNER
MEN'S short-sleeve sport, shirt $1.25.
Skip-dents & seer-suckers sanforized
wash & wear, asstd. colors.
Sam's Store 122 E. Washington
Wi
PERSONAL
CONFIDENTIAL interview with physi-
cian, nurse, marriage counselor con-
cerningebirth control, child spacing,
marriage problems. Planned Parent-
hood clinic, Tuesday, Thursday, 7:30
P.M. to 9 P.M. 122 North Fourth Ave.
Fees based on family income. P12
A VICTORIA, British Columbia, pet
owner advertised: "Pups for sale, $10.
Mother small cocker, father a dog."
F27
WANTED: MALE SUBJECTS
For psychological experiment
$1.25 an hour
Call Extension 2616
Ask for Mrs. Collins.
P28~
HE WHO LAUGHS LAST HAD TO
HAVE IT EXPLAINED,
--Changing Times
P29
YOU CAN NOW buy a leather-covered
toilet seat, decorated with your own
coat of arms, for about $48. P26
GREAT SAVINGS-all Magazine subs.
1 yr.: Time-$3.87, Newsweek-$3.50,
Life & Spts. Illustrated-$4.00. Special
Student Rates. NO 2-3061. F18
STUDENTS -WANTED
To take part in psychological ex-
periments. $1.25 per hour; apply at
1020 Administration Building.
P14
BUSINESS SERVICES
ALTERATIONS and REPAIRS
Laundry and Dry Cleaning
Harriet's Haven
1025 E. Ann NO 5-5915
Jl
REWEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade,
NO 2-4647. J4
MAYNARD & SEEGER
WELDERS and
BLACKSMITHING
109 South Ashley
NO 8-7403
J5
FOR TODAY'S breakfast why not buy
some lox, cream cheese, bagels, onion
rolls, or assorted Danish pastry? Plan
ahead also . . . later in the week we'll
have smoked whitefish, gefitle fish,
kosher soups, pastrami, and corned
beef. Shop at Ralph's for these deli-
cious foods.

300 S. Thayer

NO 2-250C

Complete line of Hi F components
including kits; complete servio on
radios, phonographs and
Hi F1 equipments.
HI Fl STUDIO
1317 South University
1 block east at Campus Theatre
X2
PIANOS-ORGANS NEW & USED
Ann Arbor Piano & Organ Co.
213 E. Washington NO 3-3109
Si
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-18M
X3
x
Grinnell's
Music Festival
Pianos
NOW ON SALE
More than 30 styles and finishes to
select from.
SAVE UP TO
185
NEW SPINET PIANO
$479
USED PIANO SPECIALS
Grands from............... $ 288
Uprights from..............$ 49
Spinet, floor sample.........$ 395
Baldwin Grand, electric player $1,200
Chickering Grand...........$ 895
Grinnell upright............$ 195
Trade-In Accepted -
Low Budget Terms
Grinnel lS
323 S. Main St.
X4

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
Expert Service on
RECORD PLAYERS
TAPE RECORDERS
Hl-FI COMPONENTS
MUSIC CENTER

RALPH'S
709 Packard

MARKET
NO 5-7131
Ji1

Michigan State
on Education.

House ConferenceI

UWWI

DIAL
NO 8-6416

1 , {

Continuous
Saturday 4
Sunday ond July 4th

TWO INGMAR BERGMAN CLASSICS
START SUNDAY

"'THE MAGICIAN'
is full of extraordinary thrills
that flow and collide on
several levels of emotion
and intellect. Supremely
contemplative, eerie and
Rabelaisian. ,. rich in
comedy and melodrama as
well as deep philosophical
thought and wonderful in its
graphic details. .. it is a
thoroughly exciting film."
-Bosley Crowther, N.Y. Times
"A Masterpiece.
nothing' short of miraculous
. .'. all of Bergman's skills
are on view in The Magician'
which all in all is a superb
motion picture."
-The New Yorker

(Continued from Page 2)
should have fiverormore years ex-
perience, with graduate degree. Sys-
tems Engineer with three or more years
experience. Engineers (Mechanical,
Electrical, Physics.) Statistical Analyst,
background in statistics and probabil-
ity theory. Computer Facility .Manager.
State of Florida. Have opening in the
Florida Insurance Department for a
life actuary.
City of Detroit. We have the current
listing of continuing examinations for
positions with the City, ranging from
typist through engineers, city planners,
social economists, social workers, psy-
chologists, art curators, historical
museumtassistant,to a supervisor of
a canning factory.
State of Connecticut, has an open-
ing for a Correction Officer.
City of Flint, has a vacancy in Parks
and Recreation Department for a Land-
scape Architect.
Direct Planning, New York, has need
for foreign students to represent this
broker/dealers in the sale of American
mutual funds in Europe and Latin
America.
Department of the Navy. We have re-
ceived a listing of jobs from the Dept.
of the Navy. If you are interested in
knowing more about positions avail-
able, contact the Bureau of Appoint-
ments.
Eastern Illinois University. Food Pro-
duction Manager. Bachelor's degree,
plus three years experience. Assistant
Food Production Manager. Grad with
one year's work in food supervision.
Dow Chemical Company, Midland.
Position in Advertising Department.
trainee in exhibit and display section.
Grad, who has completed military ser-
vice.
Food Machinery and Chemical Corp.
Two grad M.E.'s or A.E.'s with two or
three years' experience and who have
completed military service. Hoopeston,
Ill.
Midwest Business Machines Manu-
facturer has immediate opening for an
Audio Visual Specialist-still photogra-
pher-director-producer.
General Mills, Inc. Minneapolis. Po-
sition in Product and Application De-
velopment Group, man with five or
more years experience, good academic
background, probably in Biochemistry.
Merchants Creamery Co., Cincinnati.
Grad with experience to supervise
creamery operations.
Armstrong, Lancaster, Pa. Openings
in Accounting, advertising, promotion
n'' r ''~'~'4 -1)lio rla.++nftft 'flfl w iteric

Engineering, Industrial Engineering,
Physics, Textile Engineering. Also open-
ing in Economic and Marketing Re-
serach Department, M.B.A. with some
courses in statistics. Also position in
Credit Department, M.B.A. or business
grad.
W.R. Grace & Co., Research Division,
Clarksville, Marland. Pliymerchemists,
physical chemists, physicists, mathe-
matics, analytical chemists, inorganic
chemist.
Biaw-Knox Co. Pittsburgh. Jr. En-
or C.E., Structural Engineers, five to
gineer, C.E. or M.E., Sales Engineer,
prefer M.E., Product Supervisor, M.E.
or C.E., Structural Englneers, five to
ten years experience. Piping engineers,
five-ten years experience.
Long Beach State College, California.
Administrative 'Assistant to the Dean
of Students, M.A. with background in
personnel preferred, with active un-
dergraduate participation in student
organizations. Admissions Officer. B.A.
with some grad, work. Year's experience
as Registrar or in Student Personnel.
Student Activities Advisor. Master's de-
gree preferred, with active undergrad-
uate participation in student organi-
nations.
For further information, contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 4021 Admin.
Bldg., ext. 3371.

0

vmm
qF i Aft

Read
Daily
Classifieds

'Fountain Pen Sales
24-Hour Service on Repairs

MORRI LL'S

I

314 S. State St.

YOU'LL BE ABLE TO SEE REAL GHOSTS
a THROUGH MY GHOST-VIEWER. FREE TO
EVERYONE AT THIS MOVIE!!!

NO 3-2481
J2

:TPA4

Organzatioln
Notices

July 2, 1960
Lutheran Student Center and Chapel,
Picnic and Swimming, July 3, 3 p.m.,
Meet at Center, 801 S. Forest Ave.

ENDING TONIGHT
Bz8 WUDFR
SkEA D T
AND
"Mam own & mm

. *

"1

f7

I

-

NOW
DIAL NO 2-6264

jZPI2~~ g'g

LATE SHOW
TONIGHT

}
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x4Il

INGMAR BERGMAN'S

m nsadgm Effam ' ME I" "71"Al 1

I M K m-_ _ __ -.-i1160 Y Ftit:,AV 1nHVKj'r Cm lUtit 1

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