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June 29, 1960 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-06-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WFDNEq DAV_ CINF. 9.4

THE ICHIi~NJ)A1Y TNTI~~A'I 1ThTI~ Of

lviu ®pLA , iuiN

t+ Ctl

gers Clobber Red Sox, 10-1;
ashinglon Edges Chisox, 2-1

Hard, Hantze Lose
In Wimbledon Try

CLASSIFIEDS'

61

II

Cleveland 3, Baltimore 2
BALTIMORE - Johnny Tem-
ple's second home run of the year
was a vital 11th inning blow last
night that led the Cleveland In-
dians to a 3-2 victory over the
Baltimore Orioles.
The triumph edged third-place
Cleveland to within11/2games of
the second-place Orioles in the
American League race.
Philadelphia 2, Los Angeles 0
PHILADELPHIA-Rookie Pan-
cho Herrera clouted his ninth
home run to extend his batting
streak to 20 consecutive games
last night as the Philadelphia
Phillies beat the Los Angeles
Dodgers 2-0 behind freshman
Dallas Green's three-hit pitching.
Green, a former University of
Delaware basketball star who
came to the Phillies from Buffalo
with an unfashionable 3-4 record,
made his first National League
triumph a masterpiece.

WIMBLETON (P) -- American'
tennis prestige plummeted to an
all-time low yesterday when the
the two U.S. singles representa-
tives, Darlene Hard and Karen
Hantze, were knocked out of the
Wimbledon championships.
First the 17-year-old Miss
Hantze, of San Diego, Calif., went
down fighting before the booming
shots of Britain's six-foot Chris-
tine Truman, 4-6, 6-4, 6-4. Then
Miss Hard of Montebello, Calif.,
twice a finalist and Uncle Sam's
main hope of regaining the wom-
en's dominance held so long,
bowed in a staggering upset to
pretty Sandra Reynolds of South
Africa 6-1, 2-6, 6-1.
Buchholz Falters
Shortly before this double deb-
acle, Earl Buchholz, Jr., the St.
Louis youngster collapsed Monday
while leading top-seeded Neale
Fraser, announced he was in no
condition to continue the tour-
nament.
So he and his fellow 19-year-old
Charles (Chuck) McKinley, were
forced to default to Jaime Couder

and Manuel Santana of Spain-
another blow to U.S. hopes.
This left the United StAtes with
the makeshift team of Barry Mac-
Kay and Ron Holmberg in the
men's doubles. They were forced
to the fullest to beat a scrappy
Mexican tandem, Francisco Con-
treras and Mario Llamas, in a
third third round match, 4-6, 8-6,
10-8, 4-6, 6-3.
It's the worst American showing
ever in this oldest of tennis cham-
pionships, dating back to 1877. It's
the first time there hasn't been
a Yankee racket-swinger, man or
woman, in the tournament's semi-
finals.
A phlegmatic Indian, Ramana-
than Krishnan, cut down the
fourth-seeded Luis Ayala of Chile
with beautiful ease 7-5, 10-8, 6-2
to qualify for a semi-final spot
opposite Fraser. Rod Laver, the
flashy Australian lefthander, whip-
ped teammate Roy Emerson 6-4,
5-7, 6-4, 6-4 and entered the semi-
finals opposite Nicola Pietrangeli
of Italy, conqueror of Barry Mac-
Kay.

REAL ESTATE
STOP and SEE
1804 Cooley Ave.
By owner, three yr. old, three
bedroom ranch. Slate entry,
large living room, dining area,
tile bath. Aluminum storms,
screens, gutters. Shrubs and
flowers. Lot 53x170x101x150
on quiet dead end street one
block from Wines and For-
sythe schools. 1804 Cooley
Ave. NO 3-6551.
SEE IT TODAY! !
R
PERSONAL
For the best in food, condiments, and
household hardware items,
Shop at
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard NO 5-7131
F14
HH: PLEASE SEND me two of your best
boys for an early morning attack on
the Phi Mu house and adjacent resi-
dences; Joint Judic members pre-
ferred, but not necessary. WBR F21
THELMA: Thay, where were you latht
night, anyway? F20
NEW, USED, furnished rest room doors.
I have all sizes and most common
shapes; reasonable prices and long
term credit. E. L. Haggert, 3724 South
Quad. P19
GREAT SAVINGS-all Magazine subs.
1 yr.: Time-$3.87, Newsweek--$3.50,
Life & Spts. Illustrated-$4.00. Special
Student Rates. NO 2-3061. F18

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .80 2.00 2.96
3 .96 2.40 3.55
4 1.12 2.80 4.14
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily
Phone NO 2-47 86

I-

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
Complete line of Hi Fi components
including kits; complete service on
radios, phonographs and
Hi Fi equipments.

HI F STUDIO
1317 South University
1block east at Campus Theatre,

X2,

PIANOS-ORGANS NEW & USED
Ann Arbor Piano & Organ Co.
213 E. Washington NO 3-3109
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-1834
X3

UART VOTES AGAINST IT:
Senate Kills Professional Snorts Bill
14

Grinnell's
Music Festival

By The Associated Press
Sen. Philip A. Hart (D-Mich)
contended Congress would be
getting far off base in trying
to legislate for the sports world.
Hart claimed it is the Con-
tinental League founders' own
fault that they are not further
along toward a place in the big
league ranks.
"If they didn't feel they could
look to Congress to create their
league, they would long since
have created their league," Hart
said.
WASHINGTON - The Senate
killed a bill last night to place
professional sports under the anti-
trust laws and open major league
baseball rosters to an unrestricted
draft.
The legislators sent the hotly
disputed bill back to the Senate
Judiciary Committee after adopt-
ing an amendment which the
measure's backers contended
would gut it.
"The hour is late, the deed is
done," Sen. John A. Carroll (D-
Colo.), one of the bill's main back-
ers, told the Senate in moving to
have it sent back to committee. It
was sent back on a 72-12 vote.
Adopt Amendment
The amendment, sponsored by
Sen. Alexander Wiley (R-Wis.),
would have given professional
baseball the same limited exemp-
tions from the antitrust laws as
the bill would have provided for
pro football, hockey and basket-
ball. It was adopted by a 45-41
roll call vote.
The action - somewhat of a
surprise - came after Sen. Joseph
C. Mahoney (D-Wyo.) had urged
passage of the bill to "give major
league baseball back to the na-
tion."
"Major league owners have a

monopoly control of baseball
players from which they ought to
be relieved," O'Mahoney said.
Carroll told the Senate he hoped
the Judiciary Committee next year
could work out a bill on which its
members could reach substantial
agreement.
Eisenholwer
Tells Youth
To Try Golf
WASHINGTON ( R) - President
Dwight D. Eisenhower urged the
winner of a national youth leader-
ship contest yesterday to take up
golf as a means of remaining
healthy.
The President's advice was to
Stephen K. Smith, 18, of LaFay-
ette, Ind., who won a $1,000 schol-
arship in a nationwide contest
sponsored by the Elks.
Young Smith said Eisenhower
showed much interest in his de-
bating and speech activities, and
also asked whether Smith engaged
in athletics.
The youth replied that he had1
not, except for a little fencing'
and some participation in other
sports on an informal basis.
"He told me I had better get in-
to athletics and said it would keep
me healthy," Smith said. "And he
suggested that golf would be a
good game."
Eisenhower, an ardent golfer
himself, also made a point that
Smith could continue to play golf
in his later years, and would not
have to forego active participa-
tion as in the case of some other
sports.

The committee split widely on
the measure, and had reported it
to the Senate without recommend-
ing either for or against its pass-
age.
The bill apparently would have
run into a dead end in the House
in any event. Rep. Emanuel Celler
(D-N.Y.), the House Judiciary
Committee chairman, had indi-
cated his group - which would
have handled the bill - planned
no more meetings in this Con-
gressional session.
The bill had been designed to
spell out limited exemptions from
the antitrust laws for professional
football, basketball and hockey,
and impose stricter federal curbs
on pro baseball.
Spike Briggs
Goes Home
BENNINGTON, Vt. (M)-Walter
0. (Spike) Briggs, former owner
of the Detroit Tigers, hospitalized
three weeks for a cerebral hemor-
rhage left the Henry Putnam Me-
morial Hospital in good condition
yesterday.
Briggs, scion of a prominent De-I
troit family and a noted sports fig-
ure was stricken June 5 when he
was on his way to the graduation
of his son James, at Williams Col-
lege in nearby Williamston, Mass.
A hospital spokesman said he
believed Briggs and his wife were
bound for their summer home, but
didn't know where this was. He
added that Briggs left in "very
good condition."
He had been admitted to the
hospital in a "critical" state.

STUDENTS WANTED
To take part in psychological ex-
periments. $1.25 per hour; apply at
1020 Administration Building.
F14
.PARKING SPACE behind Campus The-
ate $5 armonth. Phone NO 3-4322.
127Willard. F15
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessor-
ies. Warranted & guaranteed. See
us for the best price on new &
used tires. Road service-mechanic
on duty.
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it!"
1220 S. University at Forest
NO 8-9168
S1
WHITE'S AUTO SHOP
Bumping and Painting
2007 South State NO 2-3350
S2
FOR RENT
PLEASANT ROOM for bus. or college
women. Forsummer or fall. Near the
bus line. Breakfast privileges. $7.50
a week. Phone NO 8-6551. C20
RECREATION ROOM for rent facing
Huron River. 1%2 miles from campus.
To young, refined married couple
only. Phone after 6 P.M. or before 10
A.M., NO 3-5126. C17
GOOD STUDENT apartments close to
campus at 344 S. Division. Phone Mr.
Pray. F. A. Sergeant Co. Realtors,
NO 2-3259. C12
GARAGE FOR RENT. $10 per month.
909 Packard. Call NO 3-7383. C15
CAMPUS - HOSPITAL: Girls to share
large house for summer. International
students welcome. Phone NO 3-5381
after 5 P.M. C13
NEAR ST. JOSEPH'S. Three rooms, fur-
nished. Private bath. NO 2-5776, eve-
nings NO 2-5140. C1
CAMPUS -- Clean furnished bachelor
apartment, $75. Three room apart-
ment,'$95. 614 Monroe. NO 3-5224.
C2
LARGE pleasant rooms. Linens. Cleaned
weekly..1315 Cambridge. NO 2-8718.
C8
BARGAIN CORNER
MEN'S short-sleeve sport shirt $1.25.
Skip-dents & seer-suckers sanforized
wash & wear, asstd. colors.
Sam's Store 122 E. Washington
W1
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: U-M Graduation ring. Initials
P.C.W. inside. Phone NO 8-8838. Re-
ward. Al

o ienos
NOW ON SALE
Morethan 30 styles and finishes to
select from.
SAVE UP TO
$185
NEW SPINET PIANO
$479
USED PIANO SPECIALS
Grands from.............. 288
Uprights from...............$ 49
Spinet, floor sample........ $ 395
Baldwin Grand, electric player $1,200
Chickering Grand ............$ 895-
Grinnell upright............$ 195
Trade-In Accepted
Low Budget Terms
Grinnell's
323 S. Main St.
X4
USED CARS'
1948 PONTIAC. Great tran'R. & H.
Highest offer takes it. NO 2-3061. N3
CLEAN '54 Volkswagon. Sunroof. New
WSW tires, safety belts, radio. NO
3-3893. N1
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS wanted to Cape Cod area;
leaving June 30, returning July 4.
Call NO 2-3241; after 5, NO 8-6101.
01
FOR SALE
d956 MARLETTE housedtrailer. 46x8, 2
bdrm., excellent condition. 20 min-
utes from campus. Greenacres Trail-
er Court. HUnter 3-5263. B3
BUSINESS SERVICES
ALTERATIONS and REPAIRS
Laundry and Dry Cleaning
Harriet's Haven
1025 E. Ann NO 5-5915
J1

,,

CAMPUS

WIN, LOSE, OR DRAW:
Johansson To Retire After Patterson Rematch

OPTICIANS
Most frames replaced
while, you wait.
Broken lenses duplicated.
FAST service on all repairs.

will know more about Patterson
than the last two times. I'll havei
more to work with."
Johansson did not elaborate
when he said his next fight would
be "my last . . . my- absolutely
last one."
According to estimates of
Johansson's purse from the actual
fight gate, theater television, radio
and movies he will get almost
$650,000 for the June 20 bout
in New York.
Ingemar said the third fight
with Patterson might be staged
"somewhere on the West Coast
probably Los Angeles, maybe in
October, maybe in November,
maybe later. Nothing has been set
definitely."
The rematch contracts call for
a third fight fight 120 days of
June 20.
Won't Return to Sweden
Johansson said he did not plan
to return to Sweden, his native
country, in the near future and
did not plan to return to the
United States until it was time to
begin training for his last fight.
He said he might "occasionally"
go to Sweden later. His fiance, Bir-
git Lundgren, who accompanied
him on the flight, will return to
the old home town, Goteborg,
Sweden, next week.
The former champ will make a
movie about Denmark with singer
Dinah Shore for American tele-
vision consumption. Then he will
go to Geneva, his adopted new
home.

Goteborg city officials recently
ruled that Johansson must pay
income taxes in Sweden, refusing
to recognize his emigration to
Switzerland. Swedish taxes are
high, Swiss taxes among the low-
est in Europe.
Asked if he saw much improve-

ment in Patterson, Johansson said
he was "better, but not consider-
ably so."
When reporters asked about his
own fighting, Ingemar said, "as
for me, I thought I was quite good
in the beginning. But I was slow
... too slow .. . during the entire
match. And in the second round
(when he hit Patterson with a
stiff right hand) I didn't shake
him enough . . . at least not so
much as I wanted to." ,
Johansson denied that he plan-
ned to take an extensive medical
checkup because of his knockout.
"I feel perfectly all right," he
said.

240 NICKELS ARCADE
NO 2-9116 NO 8-6019
J73

SALE PRICED!

INGEMAR JOHANSSON
... his last fight
rI

Our Entire Stock
WASH 'N WEAR

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