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June 22, 1960 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-06-22

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22, 1960

IME MICHIGAN DAILY

22, 1960 TIlE Ml~HIGAN DAILY

I

kef eler Must Reverse
ticism of Administration

AWARDS, POSITIONS:
'U' Faculty Members Recognized

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

By JACK BELL
Associated Press Political Writer
Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller ap-
parently will have to overlook
some major policy differences with
Vice-President Richard M. Nixon
in campaigning for the GOP ticket
this fall.-
Nixon, the expected Republican
presidential nominee, drew some
sharp contrasts with the New York
Governor's position in outlining
his economic views in a St. Louis
speech yesterday.
In turn, Rockefeller revived in
Advocates.
New Aide

BINGHAMTON, N.Y. VP)-Gov.
Nelson A. Rockefeller set the stage
yesterday for a new clash with
J the Eisenhower - Nixon Adminis-
tration by declaring the federal
government needed a super-cabi-
net official with broad powers over
defense and foreign policy.
A "There is something seriously
wrong with the working of the
decision-making processes of our
government," the Republican Gov-
ernor asserted in a speech heavy
with indirect criticism of President
Dwight D. Eisenhower's Adminis-
tration.
Rockefeller said the nation
needed a First Secretary of the
Government to "assist the Presi-
dent in the exercise of his au-
thority in the whole area of na-
tional security and international
affairs."
A proposal for the creation of
just such a post was considered
and rejected by the Eisenhower
Administration.
Rockefeller said the U-2 spy-
plane incident and the collapse of
Eisenhower's plan to visit Japan
were "serious evidence of the in-
adequacy of our government ma-
chinery."
Rockefeller, who is holding him-
self open to a draft for the Re-
publican nomination for Presi-
dent," made no direct criticism of
Eisenhower or of Richard M.
Nixon in his speech at a Rotary
Club meeting.
Rockefeller's speech opened the
possibility of new differences be-
tween Nixon and himself.

a Binghamton, N.Y. speech the
proposal for a First Secretary of
Government that President Dwight
D. Eisenhower-and Nixon-once
considered and abandoned.
Renews Contention
Rockefeller renewed his conten-
tion that the summit collapse, the
spy plane incident and subse-
quently the "unhappy fate" of
Eisenhower's plan to visit Japan
shows there is something seriously
wrong inWashington's decison-
making processes.
He said a First Secretary, work-
ing directly under the President,
could tie together the loose ends in
national security and international
affairs.
While he has made no public
speeches on the First Secretary
proposal, Nixon generally has de-
fended the Administration's course
in the spy plane and Summit af-
airs. He has gone along with the
Administration's position that
rioting in Japan was Communist-
inspired.
Knocks "Growthmanship"
In St. Louis Nixon hooted at
those he said are playing a game
of "growthmanship" by advocat-
ing measures to expand American
economy to meet the threat of
Soviet competition in this field.
Saying there is "need for the
American economy to grow faster,"
Rockefeller has called for action
to gear national policies to an
annual growth rate of b to 6 per
cent.
In contrast, Nixon said "the
growthmanship school argues that'
the government should plan and
manipulate the economy to arrive
at an arbitrary, fixed percentage
rate of growth."
No Comparison
The Vice-President said there
is no way of comparing Soviet and
American economic growth. Any-
way, he said, the Russians can't
catch 'up with the United States
In this century. To support this he
said the total Soviet production
of goods and services is 44 per cent
of that of the United States today,
just as it was in 1939.
These differences of viewpoint
apparently are going to have to be
balanced against the areas where
the two men agree fundamentally
when Rockefeller undertakes his
proposed nationwide tour to help
elect national GOP candidates this
fall.
There will be other points of
difference, too.
Nixon has stood behind Eisen-
hower's defense program and
against Rockefeller's assertion that
"our national defense needs great
strengthening," at an estimated $3
billion in increased outlays.
DIAL NO 2-6264
ENDING TODAY
, 00BE iKE SPM
[~L~J THURSDAY
"Greatest Show
On Earth"

if I

MHA President ... E
Roger B. Nelson, associate di-1
rector of the University Hospitals,
became the 41st president of the1
Michigan Hospital Association at
their recent convention in Trav-
erse City.
"Hospital and Medical Econom-
ics," an address by Walter J.
McNerney, director of the Bureau
of Hospital Administration at the
University, began the convention.
which hosted more than 250 hos-
pital authorities. - McNerney is
completing a study financed
through a Kellogg Foundation
grant of $325,000, investigating
hospital and medical economics in'
the state.
Prof. Thomas G. Gies of the
business administration school
spoke on "What Do We Know
About the Economy of the Six-
ties."
Fine Elected . .
Prof. Sidney Fine of the history
department has been elected pres-
ident of the University's chapter
of Phi Kappa Phi, national hon-
orary society, to succeed Prof.
Otto Graf of the German depart-
ment.
Profs. Rhoda Reddig, dean of
the nursing school, E. Lowell Kel-
ly, chairman of the psychology
department, and Rensis Likert, di-
rector of the Institute for Social
Research, were elected to the so-
ciety's executive committee.
ESD Award ..
The Engineering Society of De-
troit has presented its 1960 Out-
standing Young Engineer Award
to Prof. Edward E. Hucke, asso-
ciate professor of metallurgical
engineering.
Prof. Hucke's specialities include
ferrous and nonferrous foundry
metallurgy, diffusion in liquid
metals, and surface phenomena.
He Joined the University faculty
in 1955 after taking his degrees at
the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology.
Fred J. Meno, retiring president
of ESD, presented the award to
Prof. Hucke at the society's an-
nual meeting in Detroit's Rackham
Building. The award, made yearly
to an engineer under 30 years old,
is based on record of achievement
and recommendations.
Promotions. . .
The Regents approved three
promotions of University faculty
at their June meeting.
Walton M. Hancock, associate
research engineer at Willow Run
Laboratories and lecturer in in-
dustrial engineering will become
associate professor of industrial
Senior Gets
Study Grant
Arnold Schuring, '61M, is one
of 28 American students awarded
fellowships to study medical prob-
lems in remote areas of the world.
Shuring, from Grand Rapids,
will receive a grant of $2,441 to
permit him and his wife, a regis-
tered nurse, to spend 11 weeks at
the Takum Christian Hospital in
Nigeria, West Africa.
A committee of the Association
of American Medical Colleges
selected the winners, whose fel-
lowships are supported by a Phila-
delphia pharmaceutical firm.
The purpose of the awards is to
give young doctors a chance to
become familiar with diseases not
commonly seen in America. The
students will be guided by doctors
already practicing in the areas,
and will help organize and main-
tain public health programs.
Dr. Ward Darley, head of the
AAMC, said the overseas experi-
ence will give the men a chance to
act as individual ambassadors of

thmmerican medical education
system.
School Selects
Largest Class

engineering on a two-thirds time
basis at the start of the fall se-
mester. His appointment is effec-
tive for a three year period.
James Nicholls, research en-
gineer in the University Research
Institute and lecturer in aeronau-
tical engineering, has been pro-
moted to associate professor of
aeronautical and astronautical en-
gineering on a half-time basis, ef-
fective at the start of the coming
academic year.
A promotion from instructor to
assistant professor of Spanish, be-
ginning in the fall, was awarded
to William McCrary.
Emeritus Titles . .
Emeritus titles were given at
the June Regents meeting to six
faculty members who have con-
tributed a combined total of 190
years of service to the University.
Prof. George Brigham, Jr., be-
came professor emeritus of archi-
tecture for his 29 years of service;
Prof. James Dunlap was named
professor emeritus of Latin and
Greek, with 41 years of service be-
hind him; Prof. William Egly, who
has served 40 years, earned the
title of associate professor emeritus,

been with the University 11 years.
Prof. Hirsch Hootkins, whose serv-
ice amounts to 39 years, was given
the title of assistant professor
emeritus of Spanish. Prof. Philip
Weatherill became assistant pro-
fessor emeritus of chemistry.
All are at least 70 years old and
have been on a year of retirement
furlough except Prof. Weatherill
who has been given permission to
retire at the age of 67.
Radio Show . .
Prof. Frances M. Gillett will suc-
ceed Edythe Albert as director of
the Festival of Song, July 1.
The Festival is a series of radio
song - casts directed to children,
originating in the studios of
WUOM and rebroadcast by radio
stations all over the state.
Prof. Gillett was also appointed
assistant professor of music edu-
cation in the music school. The
action was taken by the Regents
in their June 10 meeting.
Two texts for use by teachers
and students in elementary grades
in school systems where a music
teacher is not employed are being
prepared by Prof. Gillett this sum-
mer.

(Continued from Page 2)
Hall at 8:30 p.m., Thurs., June 23. Mr.
Cates, who will be accompanied by Eu-
gene Bossart, will perform a song cycle
by Brahms, "Romanzen aus L. Tiecks
Magelone, Op. 33" Open to the public
without charge.
Placement Notices
PLACEMENT BUREAU, GENERAL
DIVISION
Scholastic Magazine. June grads, men
and women ,openings in journalism,
magazine"writing and editing. New
York.
J. L. Hudson Company. Detroit.. Two
trainees for Warehouse and Delivery
Division. Degree in Industrial Engin-
eering, Business Administration, Traf-
fic or Liberal Arts.
Jones Chemical, Wyandotte, Mich.
Two chemical salesmen for- the Michi-
gan area. Some chem background help-
ful, not necessary.
New York State Employment Serv-
ice, Executive and Technical Depart-
ment of the Apparel Industries Office
has openings for Jr. and Sr. Industrial
Engineers.
Wood Conversion Company, Minn.,
Research and Development Department
needs chemical or mechanical engineer,
process development work, experience
preferred, not necessary.
C. C. Conn, Ltd. Elkhart, Ind. Electri-
cal Engineer, work with electronic cir-
cuits, electical organs. Someone for red
search.
U. S. Army, Fort Lee, Va. Supervisory

Librarian, to serve at Army Logistics
Management Center. Four years experi-
ence necessary.
Kaufmann's, Pittsburg, Pa. June grads
from Pittsburg area interested in re-
tailing..
Richmond Review, Richmond, Mich.
editor for St. Clair County Press. Lib-
eral Arts degree, some experience and/
or training, male preferred. n/
United Air Lines, stewardesses.'f
A. T. Kearney & Company, Chicago.
Senior Industrial Engineer. Particularly
with standdard data development and
development and incentive application
background. Man in middle 30's pre-
ferred.
General Electric, Company, Ind. En-
gineering, Program Computer Techni-
cian. 2 years engineering plus Business
Administration. recent grad.
For further iniformation contact the
Bureau of Appointments and Oceupa-
tional Information, 4001 Admin. Ext.
3371.

f

h.

I

Organization
Notices
(Use of this column for announce-
ments is available to officially rec-
ognized and registered organiza-
tions only.; Organizations planning.
to be active for the summer ses-
sion should register by June 27.
Forms available, 2011 Student Acti-
vities Building.)

DIAL NO 8641
No0w SHOWING
3m O *3f
a-" E+mse
ALEC
NEW, AMAZING
DUAL ROLE!
IThe
BETT DAVIS
m0mCawuf""'
*AND
M-G-M presents
The Love Story of a Princess
in CINEMASCOPE and COLOR
GRACE ALEC
KELLY -"GUINNESS
LOUIS JOURDANI
"THE SWAN"
WEEK DAYS FROM 7 P.M.
SAT. & SUN. FROM 1 P.M.

of English. More than 55,000 students took
Professor emeritus of industrial part in the Festival of Song pro-
relations Lewis Clayton Hill has gram during the 1959-60 year.
HIGH AvE MTURE -
STHE MIGHTY ISISP!
Mark 7wain's romantic rogues cne to ;'- :; ;:::"
thrilling life on the big CnemaScope scree
, 5o R "*ARCHIE MOORE-Am
and also m
EDDIE HQDGES ON FOREST
Of f South U.
corner opposite
DIAL NO 5-6290 Campus Theatre
COMING FR IDAY
TH E STORY OF R UTH"
SPECIALS
-s $1800
25 SPRING COATS, shorties and long
25 SPRING SUITS, wool-rayons and blends
10 Rain and Shine COATS
100 better DRESSES and COSTUMES of silk prints -
solid colors - shantung - linens - laces,
t also evening and cocktail DRESSES.
Huge group of
JEWELRY
$ 2100 $1.00
Better Dresses also group of
sale priced $I0.00
redb00earrings
or Sizes 7-15, 10-44,
block 121/2-241/2, Tall 10-20. any 3 prs. $1.00
Group of98
Wears a halftoGopf
h ~ ~ ~ em l 1 t 5 strand pearl 5 etrHT
feel delicately tapered and NECK5tsraHeA
a wafer thin platform to NECrA S Group better HANDBAGS
cushion your every step. Better earrings andLong cinch BRAS
bracelets of almins.
In colors cued to autumn.Group of spring and 3 to 6 strand fresh water-
summer hats - bras - natural and pastel
VAN B O V EN SHOES handbags -gloves simulated PEARLS.
17 NICKELS ARCADE ยง $ 98 Also BETTER JEWELRY
of all kinds.
- ,

f.
7
Y

I

* Speedwriting
9 Gregg Shorthand
9 Typewriting
Accounting
Office Machines
A SINGLE SUBJECT OR A COMPLETE COURSE

The medical school has selected
194 students to enter in Septem-
ber as the Class of 1964.
To this number, the largest en-
tering class of any medical school
in the country, an additional 26
students have been added as al-
ternates, to fill vacancies created
by drop-outs, and to bring the
total to 200.
Twenty of those accepted are
women, twice the number accept-
ed last year. Nearly 800 students
applied for the 200 places.
Eighty-five of the entering stu-
dents took undergraduate work
at the University. The class in-
eludes representatives from Ha-
waii, Germany and the West In-
- idies.

I

HAMILTON BUSINES,
45th Year

A)LLEGE

William at State

Ann Arbor

Phone NO 8-7831

THE UNIVERSITY LAUNDROMAT
1327 SOUTH UNIVERSITY
WELCOMES STUDENTS!!
During this session of knowledge attainment, extricate your-
self from the persevering problem of clothes that are in need
of washinq! Let us do it for you! We offer you one-day service.

I

1 S
THIS COUPON IS WORTH 35c OFF ON PIZZA
THE COTTAGE INN PIZZERIA
AND'

I

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