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June 21, 1960 - Image 12

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-06-21

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

t

University Relinquishes Accreditation

a

in 1871, one year before the pro-!
vision of a public high-school
system on a state-wide basis.
However, both men pointed out,
the purpose of accreditation has
changed with developments in the
purpose of high schools. As high
schools became less strictly col-
lege preparatory units, accredi-
tation turned into an evaluation
of the general. quality of the
school's programs.
Because of this, Leach said,,
states turned more and more of
their accreditation functions over
to state departments of education
rather than colleges until now
Michigan is the only state in
which all state accreditation isl
done by a university.
Service Function
The Bureau of School Services'
personnel also thought that their
function should primarily be one
of service to the state high
schools,. rather than accrediting
or inspecting them, Leach said.,
The plan for the transfer was
drawn up by teachers, principals,
and superintendents of both ele-
mentary and secondary schools;
state colleges and universities,
public, community, and private;
and the University.
Calling for a commission of 41
members which will meet two or
three times each year, the plan
provides for an executive group
to meet more often and to actual-
ly decide whether or not a school
that has been "visited" will be
accredited.
If the school wishes to appeal
this decision, such pleas may be
made to the entire commission
and then, if necessary, to the
state Board of Education.
Plan Suggests
The plan suggests use of the
same criteria for accreditation
that the University now uses, at
least for the first few years. How-
ever, it would encourage the use
of secondary school representa-
tives on the visiting committees,
as the North Central Association
now does, Leach explained.
Accreditation under the present
system may be given for one, two
or. four years. The one year per-
iod is a probationary accredita-
tion,~ used when the school does
not quite fulfill the standards for
accreditation.
Two-year accreditation is for
those schools which meet the
minimum standards, and the
four-year periods are used for the
high schools meeting the highest
standards.
Schools are revisited at the end
of their accreditation to be evalu-
ated on the basis of any changes
that may have taken place in the

"I see no major change coming
with the transfer," Leach said.
But he mentioned that there may
be a gradual decrease in the
number of accredited high schools
because of the University's raising
of accreditation' standards five
years ago.
Vroman said there will be no
change in the University admis-
sions policy as it relates to ac-
credited versus non - accredited
high schools.
"The best recommendation for +
a prospective entrant is a good
record from a high school whose a
quality is known," he said Ac-'
creditation provides a chance for
this quality to be made known.
State Needs
Physicians
The state's population boom is
outgrowing its supply of doctors,
although Michigan's economy
could easily stand an increase in
physicians, two University pro-
fessors state.
Profs. S. J. Axelrod and W. R.'
Mills, in the May issue of the
Journal of the Michigan State
Medical Society, explain that the
population-physician ratio shows
Michigan in an unfavorable posi-
tion in its supply of doctors.
This ratio has steadily declined
from 125 per hundred thousand
in 1920 to 104 in 1957. In 1927
Michigan ranked 23rd among the
48 states in the number of phy-
sicians per unit of population.
The authors write that the need
is clear and urgent for more doc-
tors. They point out that the two
state medical schools (Wayne
State University and the Univer-
sity) have not met the demand due
the state's increasing population.
The authors studied a period of
six years ending in 1955 and found
that the inflow of ddoctorsfrom
out-of-state schools exceeded the
outflow from state schools by 805
physicians.
The researchers also found that
the proportion of physicians en-
gaged in active private practice
had dropped from 85 per cent in
1937 to 66 per cent in 1957; but
that this decline is offset "by the
number of physicians whose prac-
tice is confined to hospitals."
The article also rates Michigan's
extensive intern and residency
training program second only to
Louisiana.
The authors noted no increase
in the proportion of physicians
devoting theemselves to the in-
structional field.

Professors
Recognized
'y A lumni
Two University faculty mem-
bers recently received class awards
for outstanding contributions as
teachers, counselors and scholars
in their fields.
Both awards consisted of a
certificate and $1,000.
Prof. Jean Rene Carduner of the
University French department re-
ceived; the 12th annual Literary
and Education Class of 1923 Award
June 9, during the all-class dinner
at the Union.
Prof. Carduner, who joined the
faculty in 1954, directs the French
Club and teaches several courses
in French language and litera-
ture.
Writes Review
He, also writes a yearly review
of French literature for the French
Review, official publication of the
American Association of Teachers
of French, and last year received,
a Raekham grant for research in
the writings of Malraux.
The award was established by
the literary class of 1923 under
the leadership of Erich A. Walter,
now assistant to the president and
secretary to the Regents. It was
first presented in 1949.
i Prof. Carduner, who was born
i France, has received three de-
grees from the Sorbonne and a
Ph.D from the University of Min-
nesota.
Prof. Edward A. Martin, assist-
ant professor of nuclear and of
electrical engineering, has been
awarded the first Class of 1938 En-
gineering Distinguished Serevice
Award.
Engineering Breakfast
Presentation of the award was
made at the annual engineering
breakfast June 11 by Prof. Charles
E. Nagler of Wayne State Uni-
versity, class gift officer.
The award will be made an-
nually to a "younger member of
the University engineering school
faculty for outstanding teaching,
counselling and professional at-
tainment."
Funds for the cash award were
raised from gifts by class members
through the University Develop-
ment Council.
Prof. Martin has been with the
University faculty since 1953.

An information nerve center
which collects and analyzes data
about radiation emitted by
ICBM's and IRBM's as they leave
and re-enter the atmosphere has
been established at the Infrared
Laboratory of the University's
Willow Run Laboratories.
The new Ballistic Missile Radi-
ation Analysis Center is "vital to
the nation's defense," Richard
Jamron, research associate at the
center claimed, "The nation needs
the capability of detecting a mis-
sile as early in its flight as pos-

sible. Using the missile's radiation
characteristics can help in its de-
tection."
A ballistic missile creates'radi-
ation 'over nearly the entire elec-
tromagnetic spectrum, Jamron
explained. The missile causes var-
ious disturbances in the environ-
ment through which it passes at
extremely high speeds-disturb-
ances resulting in the reflection,
absorption, and generation of
electromagnetic energy
In addition, Jamron pointed
out, the missile creates plasmas,
clouds of electrically charged par-
ticles. These clouds also reflect
and generate radio waves at var-
ious frequencies:
"We receive and analyse the
radiation data," he said, "and
correlate them in order to develop
mathematical models which de-
scribe a .missile by its behavior.
Comparing data from an un-
known missile with such a model
could possibly lead to the identi-
fication of the miissile.
"The problem is' to develop a
model to fit each situation."
The research is being done for
the Pentagon's Advanced Re-
search Projects Agency under a
contract with the Air Force's
Geophysics Research Directorate.
Jamron said that the .Willow
Run Laboratories were selected
for the center because "We have
one of the country's strongest in-
frared and radar research pro-
grams."

ICBM DETECTION:
Establish Nerve Center

ENEMY ICBM?
... leaves trail

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