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July 29, 1960 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-07-29

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MLY 29,1960

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VAVI .'

ILY 29 1960THE MCHIGA DAIL
_____________________________________________________________ - - a---
_ i i. . _

hologist Analyzes 'Picnic' Characters

Education
Influences

By JUDY OPPENHEIM
n William Inge's play, "Picnic,"
h of the women must make a
ice between love and something
she wants at the same time,
f. Jesse E. Gordon of the psy-
logy department explained.
he Pulitzer prize - winning
ma which opened last night at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
ws the reaction of the women
% small midwestern town to the
val of an exciting stranger at
end of a sultry summer. His
Bence causes the motivations
ind each of their decisions to
ae to the surface.
Marries for Love
'lo, the mother of two teen-age
ghters, Madge and Milly, comes
m a successful middle - class
ily. She married her husband
ely for love, but discovered later

that love alone was not enough for
her. Her husband was unable to
provide for her the material com-
forts she wanted, and she thus lost
her middle-class position. After
a series of violent quarrels, the
marriage broke up and thus Inge's
main point, that love is incompati-
ble with marital happiness in any
respectable sense, was established
before the play actually began.
Fears Mistakes
Flo does not want her daughters
to repeat her mistakes and is
therefore anxious that Madge, who
at 18 is the beauty of the town,
marries a wealthy boy who can give
her a large home and charge ac-
counts. However, she has never
talked much with her daughter
about either her own marriage or
the more general subject of the
place of love in life.

Prof. Gordon said that psycho-
logically her reticence in discuss-
ing the subject reveals that her
own conflicts on it are not . yet
resolved. At the end of the play,
Flo says that there are still many
things she could have told Madge.
Probes Self
Madge wonders whether behind
her beauty is a real personality,
and discovers finally that what she
truly wants is a strong, dominat-
ing husband and physical love in-
stead of the respectable middle-
class marriage her mother envi-
sions for her.
Sixteen-year-old Milly, Madge's
younger sister, is still in what
Prof. Gordon termed the "pre-
adolescent" stage. She rejects
femininity and denies any inter-
est in boys or love.
A large part of Milly's trouble
stems from the fact that she is
not as pretty or socially adept as

FOR QUALITY'S SAKE:
Author Warns Against
Large Business Schools

U.S.

Voters

GRAD S.TUDENT COUNCIL Presents
SOCIAL HOUR
5-7 .. . each Friday in July
VFW CLUB
314 East Liberty
everyone must be 21 or over

vI

s
t.
i,
r
I1
4

f ~ S.G.C.
TONIGHT at 7:00 and 9:00'
HOME OF THE BRAVE~
1949
Produced by STANLEY KRAMER
with
JAMES EDWARDS, LLOYD BRIDGES,
FRANK LOVEJOY, STEVE BRODIE
The experimental film
THE CAGE
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM-
50c

The American non-voter usually
is a person of low education, in-
come and socio-economic status,
three University faculty members
said 'yesterday on a WUOM radio
program.
Donald E. Stokes, Survey Re-
search Center study director, said
"In general, people who have an
intense preference are more likely
to vote."
Many people just have a specta-
tor's interest in politics, Warren E.
Miller, SRC assistant program di-
rector noted. Among persons with
more than average schooling there
is a social obligation to vote, he
said, adding: "The educational
system conveys the feeling that
the good citizen participates in
elections by voting."
Miller said that education plays
a large role in political participa-
tion. "It exposes students to a
great deal of political information,
gives, them a sense of political
effectiveness and civic duty. Non-
voters don't feel that their vote
makes a difference and they don't
think that it is their duty to vote."
Miller said the election of 1948
probably received as much cover-
age by the mass media as any
other recent election, but "people
didn't see it as an important elec-
tion. The candidates were not too
attractive and neither were the
issues.
"The 1952 election was a good
example of an election considered
important by the voters. There
was a growing legacy of charges
of corruption and it was clear that
voters were troubled by the Kor-
ean War," he pointed out. In ex-
plaining some of the reasons why
a case could be made for low
voter turnout in the United States,
Stokes said: "Some flexibility
would go out of our system if
everyone participated."
Astronomer
Explains Plan
At Symposium
Prof. Leo Goldberg, chairman of
the astronomy department, has
been in Liege, Belgium this week,
describing United States plans for
Sspace solar telescope instrumenta-
tion at an international sympos-
ium meeting.
The satellite, to be launched in
about a year by a Thor-Delta
rocket, is specifically designed for
astronomical research.
Powered by solar batteries, the
satellite will carry ultraviolet
spectroscopes, X-ray and gamma
ray detectors and radio astronomy
receivers.
It will be stabilized by gas jets
so it can be pointed at the sun at
all times.

Colleges concerned with quality
should keep the lid on undergrad-
uate enrollment in business ad-
ministration, Associate Prof. James
E. Howell of Stanford University
says in the current University
Business Review.
Unless this is done, business ed-
ucation will be swamped by the
need to "man the blackboards," he
warns.
At present, one out of every five
bachelor's degrees in the country
goes to business administratilon
students-but fewer doctorates are
awarded in business than any
other field.
Co-author of a major study on
"Higher Education for Business,"
Howell fears business school stan-
dards may drop as degrees sky-
rocket from a total of 50,000 now
to more than 100,000 by 1970.
The "open door" admissions
policies of many schools, both now
and in the past, has prevented a
rise in entrance and achievement
standards comparable to other
professions, he notes.
"The crying need in business is
for more graduates of above aver-
age ability . .. not for more and
more mediocre graduates with
watered down ... degrees."
In the coming decade, he con-
cludes, "Better faculties will try
to hold the line on undergraduate
teaching so as to protect other
activities.
"Some faculties will no doubt
concentrate their scarce energies
on master's level training. This
'U' Trains
Pliant Staff
The engineering department has
set up an intensive 10-week sum-
mer course to train Consumers
Power Co. personnel scheduled to
supervise the operation of the Big
Rock Point nuclear power plant
under construction near Charle-
voix.
The course is being directed by
Prof. F. G. Hammitt, who says
"the training course includes ma-
terialusually given in our intro-
ductory graduate courses, with ad-
ditional specific application to nu-
clear power plant technology.
Some use will be made of our Ford
Nuclear Reactor.
The University course is in-
tended to provide background for
the Consumers Power Co. person-
nel and is the first phase of a
two-year training program in nu-
clear plant operation.
"Additional training will'include
work in existing nuclear power
plants before the company's per-
sonnel assume responsibility for
operation of the Big Rock Point
plant," he continued.
The program is expected to be
helpful to University staff as well.

should be encouraged by all inter-
ested parties-students, professors,
and employers.
"Similarly, some schools who do
not do so now will become strict
upper division schools, not admit-
ting students until the junior year.
Others may wish to explore a
three-two compromise, whereby a
two-year professional program is
preceded by three rather than two
or four years of pre-professional
work."
The entire issue of the current
Michigan Business Review is de-
voted to comments on business
education at the college level.
Nunn Given
Asian Grant

1fOSIC S60PS

--CAMPUS.
211 S. Stets
NO 8-9013

I

-DOWNTOWN--
205 E. Liberty
NO 2-0175

i

1'

I
I

The head of
Asia Library, G.

the University's
Raymond Nunn,

Starts Today at

Lave -
Laughter
Romance!

Avwwftfth

PROF. JESSE E. GORDON
... analyzes characters
Madge. At the end of the play she
gains poise and self-assurance, but
Prof. Gordon points out that she
still has not acquired the feminine
interest in romance and marriage
which characterizes most girls of
her age.
Wants Respectability
Rosemary, the unmarried school-
teacher who lives with the family
is very anxious to be respectable
and independent.
Actually, she is very unsuccess-
ful at suppressing her own sexual
needs and as a result is overzealous
in condemning anything with sen-
sual overtones. After the stranger's
arrival in town her attitude sud-
denly changes and she begs her
boyfriend, a local shopkeeper, to
marry her.
CAFE
PROMETH EAN
-- 508 E. William
Wed. and Thurs.-Poetry
Fri. and Sat.-Folk songs
(50c door charge)
Sunday-JAZZ-9-12 p.m.
(75c door charge)
Open doily 8 p.m. to 2 a.m.
DIAL NO8-6416
Now Through Saturday

I

has been appointed investigator
and director of a Chinese research
project sponsored by the Associa-
tion for Asian Studies.
The two-year project -il be un-
dertaken by Nunn with a grant of
$25,530 from the National Science
Foundation.
The subject for the investigation
will concern the development of
publishing and information sys-
tems in the social, natural and
applied sciences in mainland China
in the period 1949-59.
Nunn recently concluded nego-
tiations for the purchase of $24,000
)f microfilm . from Hong Kong,
which will include a two-million
item clipping file and a large
number of periodical and news-
paper files from mainland China.
The microfilm will be deposited
in the Mid-West Library Center
at Chicago.
"The importance of this can be
realized from the fact that almost
all scholarly periodicals and all but
one newspaper have been pro-
hibited for export from mainland
China," he said.
Scholars Use
Survey Data
Nine American scholars are at-
tending the summer Workshop on
Use of Consumer Survey Data at
the University.
The workshop is the first in a
series designed to make informa-
tion from the University's Survey
of Consumer Finances more read-
ily available to the academic world
and more useful for tests of eco-
nomic theory. It is financed by a
grant from the Ford Foundation.
The workshop is conducted by
the University Survey Research
Center's Economic Behavior Pro-
gram.

NOW!
THE I1087A AZING
I FALL POSIB
WORf S

f, -

DIAL
NO 2-6264

I

TONIGHT
TOMORROW NIGHT

I

8:00 Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Final performances of
William Inge's Pulitzer
prize-winning drama

PRODUCER ... Fred
Clark at hit funniest'

N

The bounciest fun
show of 1960-
'ges are=
Rig ng
METRO , Z
a CINEMASCOPE '

HEAD OPERATOR
The Cops kntw
all her numbers!

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
- ~ - ~ ~- --.-- - - -~ -

SONGS
"Just In Time"
"Bella Are Ringing"
"I Met A Girl"
and many more!

JUDY
1U ,ARTIf
FRED CLARK with EDDIE FOY, Jr.
JEAN STAPLETON
THE BOOKIL HNo
l ow N 14e1y" " OMII N ii I N brought the classics
to the racetrack'
ruse try ( SY - As Preseted On tie iage tj lie heatre Gud
4 Shows Doilyof 1:00 -3:35 -6:10 --8:47

PLUS
&16n Wayne
Sophia Laren
Roimo Drazzi

(Continued from Page 2)
Recitals
Student Recital: Robert Quayle will
present a recital in Aud. A, Angell Hall
on Fri., July 29, at8:30 p.m., in partial
fulfillment of the requirements for
the degree Master of Music (wind in-
struments). Mr. Quayle will include in
his program compositions by Vivaldi,
Bourdeau, Bozza, Handel, Cervetto,
Faure, Ibert, Reicha. Open to the pub-
lic,
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for Thomas
Edwin Linton, Education; thesis: "A
Historical Examination of the Purposes
and Practices of the Education Pro-
gram of the United Automobile Work-
ers of America, 1936-1959." Chairman,
C. A. Eggertsen. Fri., July 29, 10:00 a.m.
4024 University High School.
Doctoral Examination for Lawrence
Kenneth Williams, Psychology; thesis:
"The Measurement of Risk-Taking
Propensity in an Industrial Setting,"
Fri., July 29, 7615 Haven Hall, at 10:00
a.m. Chairman F. C. Mann.
Doctoral Examination for Marion
Berta Gross Sobol, Economics; thesis:
"Correlates of Present and Expected
Future Work Status of Married Wo-
men," Fri., July 29, 2A Economics Bldg.,
at 10:00 a.m. Chairman, J. B. Lansing.
Placement Notices
A leading publishing firm needs sci-
entific literature analyst. B.S. in Phys-
ics, Electronics, Metallurgy, Mathe-
matics, Mechanical Engineering, Com-

munications, etc.
Dayton, Ohio.

New York City or

Town of Normal, Ill. City Manager;
Administrative position. Experience not
necessary. Bus. Ad. or Engr.
Metropolitan Planning Dept., Marion,
Co., Ind. Sociologist. M.A. Sociology or
B.A. plus 2-3 yrs. experience. City plan-
ning research studies and assignments.
Armstrong Cork Co., Lancaster, Pa.
Openings available, Technical (Engi-
neer, Chemist, Physicist), Nontechnical
(Advertising, Promotion, Public Rela-
tions, Credit Management, Market Re-
search.
Transamerican Freight Lines, Inc.
Detroit, Mich. Accounting major. Male
under 30 yrs. Accounts Receivable
Dept.
Scott Paper Co., Chester, Pa. Oppor-
tunities for Engineers (Machine De-
sign, Chemical, Mechanical, Industrial),
Patent Attorney (6 yrs. experience, B.S.
Ch.E. preferred), and Management De-
velopment Trainees.
Standard Oil Co. (Ohio), Cleveland.
Openings in Accounting, Bus. Ad.,
Chemistry, Engineering, Industrial Re-
lations, Mathematics. Also 10 openings
for Marketing Management " Trainees
(B.A., B.S,, or M.B.A.).

National Forge Co., Irvine, Pa. Cost
Control Supervisor. 23-28 yrs., ideally
possesses M.B.A., minimum of 2-4 yrs.
experience in Corp. budget or cost.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 4021 Admin.
Bldg.
The following schools have listed
teaching vacancies for the 1960-61
school year,
Fostoria, O. (St. Wendelin High Sch.)
-English or History.
Garden City, Mich.-English/Speech.
Garden City, New York - Guidance
Counselor.
Rogers City, Mich.-7 & 8th grade
English, Art, HS Biology. ,
For any additional information con-
tact the Bureau of Appointments, 3528
Admin. Bldg. NO 3-1511, Ext. 489.

Box office open 10-8 daily

$1.75

$1.25

Next week:

Mozart's opera, "DON GIOVANNI."

Purchase reservations now at box office. Extra per-
formance Mon., Aug. 8. - Dept. of Speech

I -- --

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---- - -
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- -- _____

,e4ar
.',~,%in wol
lidly ', , ""Il 1 Print4
S "'TI
~w \\

wejdin

EXTRA SPE,
For Today
2000D
(N~ SIZES 7-15, 10-44.1
4}::
Y ~

:CIAL VALUES
and Saturday
-RESSES
0 each'
10 12 -26/2 - To 1110-20

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f you are planning one, we
ely will enjoy helping you
rking out the details of your
ed needs.
We offer tasteful, beautiful
ing invitations and an-
ements, printed, embossed,

E

V ERETT'S

DRIVE-IN

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